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jp1
3-6-16, 7:59pm
freshstart's thread about her pants got me thinking about things I own that have served me well and for a long time. The first thing that popped into my head is a belt that I own. It's a basic black leather belt that I wear with jeans. I bought it new at a flea market in Pennsylvania about 24 years ago. At the time it was too big (they didn't have any shorter) so I had to add a hole to it. I still wear it regularly. It's a little worn but not too bad. And I now use one of the original holes because my waist has grown about 3 inches in the ensuing years.

My last suitcase, which finally died about 2 years ago, is another thing. It held up great through 15 years of frequent travel. When it died everything seemed to die all at once. The zipper pulls all fell off over the course of maybe 3 months and then the wheels started to disintegrate. I wanted to replace the wheels since they were the same size as rollerblade wheels and I own a bag full of those, but couldn't figure out a way to do so without cutting the lining. Hopefully my current suitcase will hold up as well.

cdttmm
3-6-16, 8:18pm
I had two pairs of athletic pants that I wore for about 20 years. They were not inexpensive and I bought them when I was young and quite broke. When they finally had to be retired I was quite bummed as I knew I'd probably never find another pair that would withstand the abuse they did. I really liked those pants...

I have a hat that I got when I completed my first 50 mile race 10 years ago. I've worn it every day during the winter months since I got it. It's definitely starting to show it's age, but I'm not giving it up any time soon!

Gardnr
3-6-16, 9:11pm
We got 24y out of our Natuzzi leather sectional before we replaced it last summer. Cheap sofas add up to more than we spent as they don't last many years with true support and comfort.

We easily get 10y out of lounge pants and sweatshirts, shorts and tshirts. Those are the things we wear at home. I'm a firm believer in organic detergent and hanging to dry.

jp1
3-6-16, 9:25pm
I just came across another thing while doing laundry. My bathrobe. I wear it every day. It's at least 10 years old (and likely at least 15) since my mother made it for me and she's been dead for that long. It's kind of cool that I'm still enjoying something that she made for me so many years ago.

nswef
3-6-16, 11:46pm
I have a delft blue patterned 2 piece dress from LLBean that I bought in the 80s. I wore it at least once a week all spring and summer. It's still my go to when I want to be comfortable and look decent. I do wish I could find another like it. The skirt is still great, the top has some worn areas...but I still wear it. Just cannot get rid of it.

mschrisgo2
3-6-16, 11:57pm
This is a funny (to me) topic. I just realized a couple of days ago that I have tee shirts that I bought 30 years ago!!! One I bought long for a sleep shirt and the other I bought in Hawaii in 1986 as a swim suit cover-up. They have been worn and washed a LOT and are now falling apart.
Time to let them go, but I have to figure out what to replace them with, lol.

Mary B.
3-7-16, 12:50am
We bought a set of Lagostina pots to celebrate the completion of a house we built in the mid-90s. The handle eventually came off the frying pan and the steamer simply vanished years ago, but the rest have been in daily use ever since.

We also share a ridiculously-oversized, incredibly warm, cable-knit sweater with the title Big Wooly. Big Wooly comes past my knees. Well past. A cold person can sit on the couch and draw their legs and arms entirely inside, as if they were in a thick wool tent. We've had it since at least 1998. I found it. I was walking out in the alley behind the apartment we lived in, and a woman came out of a house down the blog. She was putting some things out with a 'free' sign, and just as I got there, she was carrying out this sweater. I looked at it, and she said, "Would you like it? I hate to just put it out here." I said yes, and the rest is history.

kally
3-7-16, 1:23am
I got a lovely and $$ umbrella on my 40th birthday. I still use it today at 60. I think because it was such a price I just really looked after it.

sweetana3
3-7-16, 7:25am
We bought a dining room set in 1975. Classic simple lines, wide comfortable seats and pecan colored. Still going strong after many moves. The cats have basically destroyed the edges of the cushions and we are deciding whether to send the chairs to have the cushions recovered. We also have similar end tables and bookcases. The rest of the furniture is a variety of antique pieces that I love. But those original pieces are so sturdy they will never wear out.

Smartest thing we did was to buy glass tops for the end tables. We are messy people and it has saved the tops.

Gardnr
3-7-16, 8:55am
We bought a set of Lagostina pots to celebrate the completion of a house we built in the mid-90s. The handle eventually came off the frying pan and the steamer simply vanished years ago, but the rest have been in daily use ever since. .

I bought a set of those when visiting the Netherlands back in 1979 when I was 18. One handle finally gave up the ghost last year-hub couldn't fix it anymore. Grateful that there is a stainless steel handle inside the plastic ones. Steel bottom pans will outlive us!!!

If I really look around there isn't much new except replacements for things that "died". Even our home. We bought it over 25y ago and we're stayin' till someone hauls us out:~)

SteveinMN
3-7-16, 11:15am
I seem to have lots of stuff like that...

- a stereo receiver I bought 38 years ago. I still use it occasionally, but after I get it tuned and re-capped, it will again be the primary music system in the house.
- a plastic cup I got in college which I have used most days over almost 40 years. The lettering on it is long gone and it's a bit scary to think that even after 40 years the cup still has decades left in it. But I prefer to think of all the disposable cups I haven't used and all the glasses I would have broken by now.
- my 35-year-old Cuisinart food processor. Granted, it's not in daily use. But I don't think it would suffer for that. The plexiglass work bowl (its second) is showing some wear, but that's to be expected.

I'm a "buy-and-hold" kind of guy.

iris lilies
3-7-16, 11:40am
Steve, a long held plastic cup! That's cute. DH has had some large hard plastic glasses for a good 15 years. They are stained and discolored, but when I go to replace them, he won't allow it. They are very large and are a pecfect size for ice tea and I cant find any as big.

This week, after I knocked down DH's 30 year old jade plant by mistake, I was forced to listen to a recitation of how long he's had each of several plants. There are a few 30 year old cactus plants around here.

Our Kitchen Aid mixer is 27 years old, but thats not unusual for these things. I don't want ths to devolve into a discussion about the short life of modern appliances, so I will shush.

freshstart
3-7-16, 12:32pm
I am very gentle on shoes, most of them are as old as my pants, lol. I would get them and classic clothes, especially dresses very cheaply at the Talbot's Outlet, often items were less than$10. They moved an hour away so I have not been buying there, but those clothes and shoes were definitely work wear, not at home clothes. When I was in the period of my life where I wore the same size for a decade, these were my workhorse items, wore like iron and because they were classic, I didn't feel like I was so outdated it was noticeable. When I gained wt and my shape changed in menopause, I brought a huge pile into work for my colleagues and everything was gone in an hour. It was fun watching my clothes be used by someone else for years.

I should probably purge the shoes but they take up no room and I do have occasion to wear them. I have a pair of Dansko sandals and a pair of Clark's, both bought in outlets in Maine when 9/11 happened. I can't stand the thought of one more summer wearing these same sandals. 15 yrs? I can let them go, but they uglied out, they are not worn out.

rodeosweetheart
3-7-16, 1:27pm
I have a Peugeot watch from the 70's that I love.
When i was in high school, I wore out my uncle's khaki pique polo shirt from the 1930's. Not sure how I ended up with it--he was shot down in Normandy in WWII, and I also had his silk aviator scarf.
Still use my awesome Dansk Kobenstyle pot, which I prefer to anything anything newer.
When I go to my mom's house, she still has my towel that I took to college, over 40 years ago. Actually, most of their linens are things I sent them over the years. But I used to work at Laura Ashley.

Teacher Terry
3-7-16, 2:11pm
When I was 25 I bought an antique dining table & chairs and are still using them. They are in great shape and beautiful 36 years later.

catherine
3-7-16, 2:35pm
I could count on my hands the number of pieces of brand new furniture I've bought over 40 years of married life. I am still using my mother's Ethan Allen dining set. That stuff doesn't give up or wear out! I did have the chairs re-rushed about 15 years ago for $50 each, and they're as good as new!

I also LOVE my favorite great-aunt's desk, and my mother's deacon's bench.

I love the kitchen chairs that I asked to purchase from our favorite Japanese restaurant when they were moving to a new place, and not only did the owner not charge us for them, he delivered them to our door.

I love the large antique plate rack/wall shelf that I spotted in a consignment shop that fits so perfectly in a narrow spot in my small kitchen.

I could go on...

lessisbest
3-8-16, 4:18pm
We purchased Saladmaster Stainless Steel Cookware in 1976, and my parents purchased theirs in 1967 and my brother is using it. Well worth the lifetime of use.

I purchased what I thought was a really expensive pair of Cougar Snow Boots in 1976 and have worn them every year since. New shoestrings and waterproofing do wonders for them each year. So it's not just how much something costs, it's how much it costs per wear.

We have lots of tools and gardening equipment that have seen 2 and 3 generations and will be passed down to the next. Avoid letting things get dull or rusting.

When hubby was in college (1974) he designed several pieces of furniture and also built them. One table was an International Furniture Design Contest Winner and two chairs were also prize winners. They are now our family heirlooms. We have several other pieces of furniture he built in high school (1965-68) and our daughter has hubby's brother's desk he built in high school (1969).

And how about that Tupperware!!!! ;) Our granddaughter took some of our "ancient" Tupperware to college with her - so that's 3-generations.

freshstart
3-8-16, 4:31pm
that's impressive! I was 6 when you got your Cougar boots, lol. How extremely cool to have furniture made by DH.

ToomuchStuff
3-8-16, 4:57pm
Part of my cookware was given to me by my brother when I got my house, and part of it was inherited. His wife wanted to open the newer wedding present stuff, rather then the stuff, he got used somewhere. I would say better then 90% of my furniture is three generations old, some more, a couple pieces less. Tools, are a mix of inherited, used sales, some new I bought starting at 16, etc. I still have my grandfathers first electric drill, which is worthless by modern standards (heck, it has no reverse and is 1/4" chuck), but kept it because of him. I have my great grandmothers cane, which I used about 20 years ago, after hernia surgery for a while. I wouldn't venture a guess at my clothes, as I have one shirt, I didn't wear much for years (just tend to grab the clothes I just put back in front of it) and when I did rotate it to the front, one person commented that it was close to 20 years old and "vintage". (had a date on it)
Sold off the 21 year old truck last year. Kept the 14 year old truck and the now 45 year old car. (VW Super beetle)
I keep bringing up yearbooks, because I keep debating about them. A few years back, a friend was dying, and her daughter had put something about her mom in her graduating yearbook (my freshman year). Her mom had never seen it, so I took her my yearbook, while she was still in good health. Some stuff I have kept, because I have been able to hand it out to those in need, rather then just pitch it, or hope goodwill can use it.

jp1
3-8-16, 5:07pm
Oh, one other thing. My slad spinner has been working flawlessly for 8 years!

Florence
3-8-16, 7:34pm
I am still using my mother's Singer sewing machine in its original cabinet which she bought in 1961. I am still using some of the stainless steel cookware that she gave me when I married in 1968. I have Tupperware from 1973. I have LLBean clothes and shoes from God only knows when. I even have the same old husband from 1968.

sweetana3
3-8-16, 9:21pm
Florence, my mom's Singer Featherweight sewing machine was my inheritance request when she died. She got it in 1953 and it still sews perfectly.

pony mom
3-8-16, 10:43pm
I have a pair of rubber barn shoes from England called Sloshers that I bought around 1992. They're really cute---dark blue with gold soles and laces. But now the heel part of the shoe has a vertical tear in it and when we moved here 10 years ago I put them in the garbage.....then ran back and brought them inside again. They are still mostly waterproof, comfy and wide and I won't get rid of them yet.

I also have another pair of barn shoes, by Ariat----blue rubber ankle boot. They feel great but the top is tearing where the elastic is; otherwise, they're fine. They were also bought around 20+ years ago and people laugh when I complain that they're ripping when they know how old they are.

My Barbour coat from the same time looks whipped, but that's part of its appeal. The zipper needs to be replaced but I haven't gotten around to sending it to NH for the repair yet. If I need to wear it, I just step into it because the zipper doesn't come apart.

Florence
3-9-16, 2:23pm
Florence, my mom's Singer Featherweight sewing machine was my inheritance request when she died. She got it in 1953 and it still sews perfectly.

Amazing aren't they!!

Ultralight
3-9-16, 2:24pm
Did anyone on this thread refer to their spouse? haha

Rogar
3-9-16, 3:48pm
I still use the Revereware and iron skillet that my mother cooked with when I was a kid. I have possibly one of the oldest dishwashers still in use ( not me). It's a Kitchen Aid that I'm thinking was made in '68 and was in the house when I bought it. It's one of the things I show off. It's probably not energy efficient, but the energy over it's lifespan is probably good compared to what it would take to make a new one (or a few new ones based on modern quality). I have a couple of tool boxes filled with old hand tools that I've inherited and accumulated. I think about a great uncle or grandparent that had them in their hands generations ago when I use them.

One my my favorites is an old split bamboo fly rod from a great uncle, probably from the '30's. I had it refinished and use it occasionally. It's a delight. If it could talk, it would tell good stories.

freshstart
3-9-16, 5:03pm
One my my favorites is an old split bamboo fly rod from a great uncle, probably from the '30's. I had it refinished and use it occasionally. It's a delight. If it could talk, it would tell good stories.

I love this


one of my prized old things is from a woman who was like a 2nd mother to me, her best friend was an IV nurse, she died suddenly in the 70s, she was young. In the 80s, I was headed off to nursing school, she gave me this teeny calculator on a chain that was attached to a suede case. She told me her friend had used this for all her IV calculations. I used it for mine, it was in my pocket or bag for the entire 23 yrs I nursed. Here's the weird thing, it never needed a battery in the 27 years I had it, it must take an incredibly small battery. I finally cleaned out my desk boxes from work last month, it was in my bag and the battery was dead. It made me cry thinking it was a sign I'll never go back. It's in my purse, it's getting a new battery.

Gardnr
3-9-16, 9:16pm
Hubby and I are about to have our 36th anniversary and we are happy about it:cool:

I bought my sewing machine in 1992 as a gift to self for graduating with my Bachelor's degree. It was 4yo then. Runs like a dream. That stainless steel deadweight is going to outlive me!

freshstart
3-9-16, 10:10pm
congratulations on 36 years!

SiouzQ.
3-10-16, 9:38am
I have a gas dryer I bought for $50 used off Craigslist 23 years ago that is from the early to mid-1970's - in all the years I've had it, I had only one repair needed for it. At the rate I'm going lately (major car repair, possible root canal), just because I typed my bragging rights here, the dang thing will probably go out on me soon. I don't want to jinx it!

iris lily
3-10-16, 11:05am
Florence, my mom's Singer Featherweight sewing machine was my inheritance request when she died. She got it in 1953 and it still sews perfectly.

I forgot about our Featherweight club here. Yes, I've got one too, my grandmother used it, then my mother.

Selah
3-10-16, 12:40pm
I have a Chinese silk blazer I found in the basement of a moldy old thrift shop in Hastings, England, in 1995. It was probably forty years old then. I'm still wearing it, and all I've had done to it was have the lapels and the cuffs re-covered.

catherine
3-10-16, 12:41pm
I forgot about our Featherweight club here. Yes, I've got one too, my grandmother used it, then my mother.

Yup, mine is now a bookend, but I have a million memories of my great-aunt teaching me how to sew on it, and I used it to make a good portion of the clothes I wore to high school, as well as costumes for school plays.

kib
3-10-16, 2:10pm
Amazing aren't they!! (Featherweight Singer) I have one too, a 1958, it was given to me when I was 9 and I still use it more than 40 years later.

rodeosweetheart
3-10-16, 2:29pm
(Featherweight Singer) I have one too, a 1958, it was given to me when I was 9 and I still use it more than 40 years later.

I received my used Featherweight when I was 14, and my dad built me a case for it, and lined it with felt.

It is my regular go-to machine, 45 years later.

Maybe the Featherweight is the secret handshake of the Simple Living club.

jp1
3-11-16, 2:53pm
I have possibly one of the oldest dishwashers still in use ( not me). It's a Kitchen Aid that I'm thinking was made in '68 and was in the house when I bought it. It's one of the things I show off. It's probably not energy efficient, but the energy over it's lifespan is probably good compared to what it would take to make a new one (or a few new ones based on modern quality).

This is truly impressive. Have you replaced the seals on it? Otherwise I can't see how the thing isn't leaking like a sieve.

JaneV2.0
3-11-16, 3:02pm
I've had my Featherweights about 25 years. I keep them in good condition by not using them. :cool: But when I did, they were little gems--simple, easy to use, and uber-reliable.

catherine
3-11-16, 3:08pm
Maybe the Featherweight is the secret handshake of the Simple Living club.

haha! Seems to be! Amazing we all have it in common!

lessisbest
3-11-16, 3:27pm
Did anyone on this thread refer to their spouse? haha

OMG :0! Hubby and I just celebrated our 45th wedding anniversary in February, we went together for 3 years through high school, and engaged for 6 months before we got hitched.

Teacher Terry
3-11-16, 6:08pm
That is awesome!!!

ToomuchStuff
3-12-16, 1:05pm
Had a chuckle about this, because a friend of mine was laughing about my old velcro wallet I had when we worked together. While I didn't have that exact one (it was some sort of canvas like material), the leather and velcro one I am currently using, is more then 20 years old. He asked when I wasn't going to have velcro, and I responded probably when this one dies.

early morning
3-12-16, 7:57pm
Most of our things are old and well used - most of our furnishings are a century old or more. Our house was built, as far as we can find, in 1859. Sadly much of the exterior is changed, but the inside is mostly un-renovated, and has aged quite graciously. My father was a finish carpenter and cabinet maker, so I know how much skill, time, and effort went into creating the moldings, doors, stairs, trim.. I love old things and feel a connection to those who have used and appreciated them before me. I have two iron skillets that were my grandmothers, and I use them weekly. I still use the kitchen-aid mixer we got for a wedding present from our friends in 1977. I like things with stories, even if they can't speak them, if that makes any sort of sense!