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pinkytoe
12-27-11, 8:48am
I read in the NY Times that there will be a new reality show based on the success of the Extreme Couponing show. This one will show cheapskating tactics. I don't care about couponing but cheapskating fascinates me. For once, I wish I had cable just to check it out.

pinkytoe
12-27-11, 8:52am
Here is a link about the show:
http://www.foxnews.com/entertainment/2011/12/23/extreme-cheapskates-profiles-penny-pinching-perfectionists/

flowerseverywhere
12-27-11, 9:11am
I like the guy who they interviewed in the link. He has written books that are fascinating and did tours on his bike around the country to promote them. A very interesting man, and I look forward to the show. thanks.

puglogic
12-27-11, 9:39am
I like Jeff Yeager's books, though they are kinda preaching to the converted for this board :D I only hope he tones down the creepy sexual innuendo for the TV show. That's the only thing that takes away from his writing imho.

reader99
12-27-11, 11:01am
I like Jeff Yeager's books, though they are kinda preaching to the converted for this board :D I only hope he tones down the creepy sexual innuendo for the TV show. That's the only thing that takes away from his writing imho.

Yes, that's what I thought when I read one of his books recently. The remarks about his aunt's bust, etc, were entirely out of place.

creaker
12-27-11, 11:23am
Are they just doing like extreme frugal? I always thought cheapskate had more of a negative edge to it.

pinkytoe
12-27-11, 12:30pm
His aunt's bust? I guess I missed those parts.

Merski
12-27-11, 3:58pm
You know, I was thinking of a similar program but on being frugal instead of cheapskate. I will watch it and see what's going on...I wonder if they'll have our frugal star Amy D.!?

bke
12-28-11, 9:04am
Man, I can't wait to watch this tonight!!!

Mrs-M
12-28-11, 10:42am
I can't wait to watch it, too! Here's a quick teaser for everyone.

http://tlc.discovery.com/videos/extreme-cheapskates-reusable-toilet-paper.html#mkcpgn=snag1

Stacy
12-28-11, 12:00pm
Looks good. I'll have to catch it tonight.

flowerseverywhere
12-28-11, 1:13pm
I never got the creepy sexual vibe from anything I have read of his. I am looking forward to the show and have told several others about it.

JaneV2.0
12-28-11, 1:20pm
I'd love a series about thrift shopping (especially for fashion) and upcycling. This doesn't sound like what I'm looking for.

Tiam
12-28-11, 8:03pm
Are they just doing like extreme frugal? I always thought cheapskate had more of a negative edge to it.

I think that's the only way to get ratings. It's like 'Hoarders' only vaguely positive, but still shows an OCD element to it.

Mrs-M
12-28-11, 11:26pm
Weighing in with my verdict related to my first watching of the show as of this evening.

I was taken by the first couple who took in dogs and cats and cared for them, that was heartwarming, so I was able to look past the idiocracy of the husband asking restaurant goers for their leftovers and dumpster diving for special things for his wife.

Second couple/family did nothing for me. They have six kids, and paid off $89000 credit card debt in one year? And the Mrs, is complaining about the cost of toilet paper, picking/snipping weeds from the lawn of a public park to make salad, and buying up outdated food goods/products to feed her family?

Third couple, I was about done with watching the whole one hour performance by this time, and really wasn't absorbing much anymore, especially when the Mr, arrived home with two goats heads and made a meal out of the brains and eye balls.

ljevtich
12-28-11, 11:46pm
Well, after reading Mrs-M's comments about the show, I will not be watching this. Shows like this are kind of useless. I believe Amy D had said something to a news reporter after the Parade article came out about her - something to the effect "so you want to watch me fold cloth diapers, or wash the dishes, or any one of the other tiny little chores that saves us money?" And their answer was no. They wanted BIG things, outrageous acts of saving money. That is what the TV show is - outrageous acts of people getting their 15 minutes of fame.

No thanks, I do not plan to watch.

Just wondering, do any of those folks make money from being on the show?

Mrs-M
12-28-11, 11:47pm
To add, IMO, it's programs and shows like this that give simple/frugal living a bad name and remove the overall context of what SL'ing is all about.

Mrs-M
12-29-11, 12:09am
Ljevtich. I myself would gain far more enjoyment out of a reality series that actually profiled real SL families and people, the ones who really do actually practice true honest-to-goodness, simple/frugal living ways.

I actually gave thought to the second family (mother), and what she uses in the way of diapers for her children, because seeing that the show conveniently left that part out, I can only assume that the mother uses disposables, and boy would I ever love to hear her case in argument as to why she doesn't use cloth.

Pretty hard to build a case for water woes, when cloth wipes equate to much the same as washing diapers, and the cost of buying toilet paper pales in comparison to buying throwaway diapers every week/month.

But the show will be a hit IMO, strictly on the merits of the absurdity of the people they've chosen to be on the show, and the asinine things they'll do to garner attention.

Mrs-M
12-29-11, 12:18am
It's sad to think that this is the extent of what public programming has become.

crunchycon
12-29-11, 3:26am
I watched most of it, and I agree with Mrs-M - the nice story about the animal rescue really counterbalanced the guy dumpster diving for anniversary gifts and begging for food from other diners. The second couple - eh. And, of course, the TV editors emphasized the "ew-ness" of eating goats heads, because that's what all of us frugal folks do, y'know. The barterer could have been more interesting - I suspect there was more creativity involved than simply reciting "Jabberwocky" for a doughnut, but, again - - that's not "good television".

flowerseverywhere
12-29-11, 7:26am
Yes, I agree with all of you. And I don't think most clerks have the authority to give away food if someone comes in and recites a poem.

I also did not like it when the guy walked into restaurants to ask for ketchup packets. As we had discussed here before, there is a line that you cross where what you do could negatively affect business.

I'm not sure why people stay married to someone who would embarrass me like that. And forget about giving dead flowers. Don't bother.

jp1
12-29-11, 8:39am
Walking into a restaurant and asking for ketchup packets, if one hasn't bought food there, is begging, plain and simple. No different in my mind then a person on the street with a cup asking for spare change. It's not being cheap, it's asking for charity.

Merski
12-29-11, 10:04am
Learned a few new things and can easily adapt some to not so extreme measures. I think if the dog rescue people used meat scraps for the dogs, the could ask the restaurant owner & staff if they could collect them to get picked up once a week, that would be okay. The idea of collecting food to eat yourself from strangers makes me want to cringe. I like the idea of fiscal fast and dh and I might try that out. I know we have the no spend day challenge here, but a week once a season would be very cool to try.

puglogic
12-29-11, 10:34am
What a shame that this is how frugal-living folks like ourselves are being portrayed. I can't imagine the ridicule it's going to incite -- as if we didn't have enough people making fun of us already. ("Hey, pug, how're you preparing your goat head tonight? hahahahahahahahaha")

I guess our simple lives just don't make good TV. Oh well. Perhaps folks somewhere will get some inspiration from it.

creaker
12-29-11, 10:54am
What a shame that this is how frugal-living folks like ourselves are being portrayed. I can't imagine the ridicule it's going to incite -- as if we didn't have enough people making fun of us already. ("Hey, pug, how're you preparing your goat head tonight? hahahahahahahahaha")

I guess our simple lives just don't make good TV. Oh well. Perhaps folks somewhere will get some inspiration from it.

This will affect how people labeled "frugal" are thought of. "frugal" and "cheapskate" will become equivalent to a lot of people. Which I'm sure the advertisers won't mind - actually it would be interesting to see who bought commercial time.

Tiam
12-29-11, 11:28am
I don't think a show about being 'frugal' would get the kind of ratings they are looking for. They call it the learning channel, but the extreme-ness of the behavior is really what they are aiming at here. Let's see if it improves.

Tiam
12-29-11, 11:36am
I'm not sure how separating the toliet paper makes it last any longer. Wouldn't you just use more of it?

Stacy
12-29-11, 12:07pm
I'm sure that 90% of the stuff the people on this show actually do would be too boring for a show called "Extreme Cheapskates". The producers of the show just had to highlight the most "extreme" things they were willing to do to save money. I enjoyed the show for entertainment value, but was a little disappointed that it didn't go deeper. But what can you expect when it's sandwiched between episodes of "Toddlers and Tiaras"?

Stacy
12-29-11, 12:09pm
This will affect how people labeled "frugal" are thought of. "frugal" and "cheapskate" will become equivalent to a lot of people. Which I'm sure the advertisers won't mind - actually it would be interesting to see who bought commercial time.

Good point creaker -- I had it on DVR and skipped the commercials as usual. I wish I hadn't deleted it, so I could go back and check.

RosieTR
12-29-11, 12:10pm
Well, TV is TV is TV so I'm not surprised. You even get this sort of thing with a lot of the mainstream media profiling either simple livers or people who paid off big debts in some crazy way. It's not news if it's not extreme. Maybe the TP thing will inspire folks for other stuff though...feminine products and diapers for example. I shudder to think of the goat head thing-do they screen for prion diseases? Eating brains, nope not unless I'm truly starving to death and it's the only thing available. Way below grubs and such. As for weed foraging, why not? I have done that with more conventionally edible foods and I know DH's family used to scavenge for wild asparagus. I'd rather eat dandelions from the park for free than paying $3.99/lb for them at Whole Foods (and yes they sell them there, though I made up the potential price). But really are these people saving that much money? I would find it interesting to see a cost saving vs time spent vs waste saving. Cutting cloth TP might take awhile but save the same amt of time shopping or couponing for TP plus save money on the actual TP and save it from the wastewater stream if that affects treatment.

Mrs-M
12-29-11, 3:05pm
I'm not sure how separating the toliet paper makes it last any longer. Wouldn't you just use more of it?My thoughts exactly.

pinkytoe
12-29-11, 3:49pm
From the sound of it, I didn't miss anything. Might check out on hulu though.

Mrs-M
12-29-11, 6:58pm
Originally posted by RosieTR.
Maybe the TP thing will inspire folks for other stuffThat's my way of thinking, too.

Tiam
12-29-11, 7:16pm
This will affect how people labeled "frugal" are thought of. "frugal" and "cheapskate" will become equivalent to a lot of people. Which I'm sure the advertisers won't mind - actually it would be interesting to see who bought commercial time.

And advertisers don't really want frugal consumers, do they? They want to send out the image that 'frugal' means 'crackpot'. It's in their interest to do so.

Mrs-M
12-29-11, 7:25pm
Originally posted by Tiam.
And advertisers don't really want frugal consumers, do they?My guess is, no. Low cash influx, very little in the way of added market value in people like us.

Mrs-M
12-29-11, 7:40pm
Originally posted by RosieTR.
As for weed foraging, why not?Sure, I say "why not", too, but the problem I have with it is, it doesn't add up. Pulling in a high enough household income to pay-off $89000 worth of credit card debt in a year, yet foraging for greens at the local park and purchasing expired food products to feed your family with? (Food products that could possibly make someone extremely ill)? Something is grossly wrong with this picture. The savings value offset (in itself) doesn't add up, nor does the mentality to do such a thing.

flowerseverywhere
12-29-11, 8:57pm
I think what dissapointed me most is that so many people are underwater in their homes, are underemployed and of course will not be able to depend on social security or pensions like the current wave of old people. This would have been a great opportunity to show people what normal frugality is, yet I am sure there are people who turned this off and thought "what a bunch of nutcases."

there are so many useful things to do that most people who frequent here take as second nature they could have shown.

Figuring out the true cost of driving and avoiding extra trips.
eating at home and cooking from scratch- keeping extra meals on hand for those days when you just don't feel like it.
line drying clothes and working towards being as energy efficient as possible in all areas
separating your wants from your needs
saving up an buying things for cash
paying no interest by paying off your house and cars, and only charging what you can pay off in full each month.
having an emergency fund so when it hits the fan you are prepared

Unfortunately it showed none of this.

Mrs-M
12-29-11, 11:00pm
Does anyone remember the television show, Harrowsmith Country Life? It was a Canadian based TV show with the addition of a monthly publication. What an incredible and interesting show, and the hosts were the best. (Marilyn Smith, who's segments concentrated on all things related to the kitchen, was my favourite). She covered it all. Canning, cooking, baking, everything. An incredible time worth program for all.

Anyhow, I mention the program, because it was so in tune with simple, frugal living. Harrowsmith Country Life, covered it all. Withing two years of it's start (1976), it had more than 100,000 subscribers. Sadly, this year marked the end of Harrowsmith. Thirty-five years in running.

reader99
12-30-11, 5:52am
Normal frugality is actually pretty boring in day to day behavior, not really a made for TV event.

Lainey
12-30-11, 9:04am
I think what dissapointed me most is that so many people are underwater in their homes, are underemployed and of course will not be able to depend on social security or pensions like the current wave of old people. This would have been a great opportunity to show people what normal frugality is, yet I am sure there are people who turned this off and thought "what a bunch of nutcases."

there are so many useful things to do that most people who frequent here take as second nature they could have shown.

Figuring out the true cost of driving and avoiding extra trips.
eating at home and cooking from scratch- keeping extra meals on hand for those days when you just don't feel like it.
line drying clothes and working towards being as energy efficient as possible in all areas
separating your wants from your needs
saving up an buying things for cash
paying no interest by paying off your house and cars, and only charging what you can pay off in full each month.
having an emergency fund so when it hits the fan you are prepared

Unfortunately it showed none of this.

+1 I'm wondering what future episodes, if any, are going to portray. The producers have a choice to go forward with more extremes, or give solid advice as flowerseverywhere says here.

Mrs-M
12-30-11, 8:26pm
I'm still at a loss to fully understand, who, along with their misguided sense, felt that the show was worthy of a name with "Extreme" in it! IMO there's nothing extreme about it at all. That is, unless one fancies the idea of "extreme stupidity" as being a viable option.

So far the only practice that made any sense to me (whatsoever), was the cloth TP idea, everything else was ridiculous.

Tiam
12-30-11, 9:28pm
I'm still at a loss to fully understand, who, along with their misguided sense, felt that the show was worthy of a name with "Extreme" in it! IMO there's nothing extreme about it at all. That is, unless one fancies the idea of "extreme stupidity" as being a viable option.

So far the only practice that made any sense to me (whatsoever), was the cloth TP idea, everything else was ridiculous.



Because his measures seem "kooky". Kooy = Extreme.

Mrs-M
12-31-11, 8:05am
That's definitely a good way of looking at it, Tiam. :)

jp1
12-31-11, 9:28am
I'm not sure how separating the toliet paper makes it last any longer. Wouldn't you just use more of it?

I didnt watch the show and probably wont. By seperating the toilet paper do you just mean taking two ply and seperating it into two one ply rolls? If so, why not just buy one ply rolls to begin with?

Mrs-M
12-31-11, 10:10am
Originally posted by Jp1.
By seperating the toilet paper do you just mean taking two ply and seperating it into two one ply rolls?Bingo, that's exactly what the husband did. Re: buying one-ply paper, that was my initial thought, but then I thought, "how ridiculous, two-ply (as it is) borders on stability/strength issues, so why would someone want to risk single-ply"?

JaneV2.0
12-31-11, 12:05pm
Living With Ed managed to make frugality and environmental concern entertaining, and they could have taken it to a whole new level--and to the ID network--if the long-suffering Rachelle finally had enough of his parsimonious shenanigans and drowned him in one of his rain barrels!

jennipurrr
1-5-12, 8:18am
I think what dissapointed me most is that so many people are underwater in their homes, are underemployed and of course will not be able to depend on social security or pensions like the current wave of old people. This would have been a great opportunity to show people what normal frugality is, yet I am sure there are people who turned this off and thought "what a bunch of nutcases."


Yes, that was my main issue. I was really disappointed. I knew the show would be a bit outrageous, but I enjoy the Extreme Couponing show sometimes, so I thought maybe this would have something I could pick up. Not really. Plus I was getting over food poisoning and the dude eating the eyeball just turned my stomach, blech.

What's with all the weird posts in Russian(?) above?

Tiam
1-22-12, 10:41pm
I haven't seen any of these versions, but they don't look worth looking at. They seem to want to exploit a life style rather than 'learn' from it. So, has anyone learned a thing from it?

flowerseverywhere
1-23-12, 6:33am
I haven't seen any of these versions, but they don't look worth looking at. They seem to want to exploit a life style rather than 'learn' from it. So, has anyone learned a thing from it?

I learned to turn my TV off. Not that I watch much anyway. At the YMCA there are a bunch of monitors and I see so much there (even if I am trying to not pay attention) that it makes me scratch my head in wonder.

Mrs-M
1-23-12, 6:53am
Originally potsed by Tiam.
So, has anyone learned a thing from it?Not a thing. Watched it once, never again. Ljevtich, touched on something that resonated with me, that being, networks, and the lack of interest they possess to air real-life extremes related to thriftiness, simplicity, and frugality. She's absolutely right.

Considering how backwards society has become, anything tied to a little extra added work or effort, doesn't fly with today's generation. As a whole, people are lazy. If it can't be prepared from a package or tossed after use, people aren't interested, and that's a shame. Additionally, if viewer content doesn't contain violence, sex, or nudity, that too ensures a low viewing audience, because everything else is boring.

If there's one thing I've learned being the SL'er that I am, that is, we SL practitioners are of the minority. However, the simple living movement is strong, and given the right latitude through a venue delivered to the public, prepared and presented the right way, my guess is it would be a hit, but until such a time as an interested party steps up to the plate and accepts the challenge, we will continue to see these fly-by night programs and shows, with small-minded entertainment attached to them.

JaneV2.0
1-23-12, 9:23am
I saw part of the episode in which Mr. Cheapskate scrounged enough change to come up with $7.50 or so to spend for dinner so he bought two goat's heads, which he knew his wife wouldn't be enthusiastic about. For that amount of money, surely he could have found a rotisserie chicken and some greens or any number of more appealing combinations. So I guess that's the "extreme" part. As much as I enjoy TV, I can't disagree that it's a medium that's often poorly used.

Mrs-M
1-23-12, 9:50am
That's just my point, too, Jane, the extreme part of the show doesn't align with sane rationale or reason. The network producers lowered the boat into the water, but someone forgot to install the hulls drain-plug!

Spartana
1-24-12, 12:41pm
I haven't seen extreme cheapskates yet (NO CABLE) but this is a show recently on my local PBS station about a guy who was once well to do who now lives an extreme minimalist lifestyle with only 50 things (Fawn - it's future you :-)!). At his peak minimalism he only owned 10 things! Lost his marriage and broke up his family because of it. A new single minimalist in SoCal for me! OK, even he's too much of a cheapskate minimalist for me. But it's interesting to read how he went from owning and buying a huge amount of stuff (bills totaled $20,000/MONTH!!) to the extreme opposite end where no he has zero bills. No car, 2 pairs of under wear, sleeps on the floor on a yoga mat, etc... There are other shows on this station for their "Extreme Green" week. One called "Your Money or Your Life" but I think it's about elder care not the book.

www.kcet.org/shows/socal_connected/content/people/50-things.html

Sissy
1-24-12, 1:33pm
I accidentally flipped thru the channels and was "intrigued" by the show. But, then I was really quite disgusted. If my husband scrounged thru dumpsters for some crappy gift and all but dead flowers, I would throw them at him. (actually I wouldn't live with him at all!)

As for the couple that paid off their large debt, well, that one just didn't make sense to me. If they wanted to become frugal that was certainly a good decision, but would you let your children eat with people that harvested dandilion greens from a public park? How many dogs do you think peed on that stuff! Anyway, that was my very first thought!

I just didn't watch the part about the goat? head. I saw fat and eyeballs and decided I needed a potty break.

Sherry

domestic goddess
1-24-12, 2:18pm
Well, having read all your reviews, I'm no longer sorry I don't have cable and can't watch this. Sounds like there is absolutely nothing of interest here. And who would feed their children dandelion greens from a public park, probably treated with pestacides, trampled by animals and people, peed on by passing dog and saturated with exhaust fumes from passing cars? Yuck! Other segments sounded unappealing, to say the least, and novel only in the "yuck" factor. I guess there is no money in showing that frugal people look like others, and often do the same things, but in slightly different ways. Too bad, that idea might really help someone. Sounds like this show will help no one.

Mrs-M
1-25-12, 6:59am
Spartana. Wow! What an enjoyable link. Thanks greatly for posting. I wasn't surprised over the couple divorcing. (If I can't have a beautiful, expensive home, along with a few others to secure a little additional bragging rights, a driveway full of expensive vehicles, and trips around the world that last for months, then I'm not interested, see ya)... Completely and totally in keeping with today's small-minded, materialistic mentality.

Sissy. I totally agree.

Domestic Goddess. Ditto.

Mrs-M
10-18-12, 8:35am
Bump!

Anyone catch the NEW Extreme Cheapskates? I seen it advertised last night, but couldn't bring myself to watch it courtesy of the asinine absurdity of the last installment of EC.

SimplyL
10-18-12, 9:35am
I've watched commercials for it, during the one program that I do record. Like someone mentioned, it's the extreme aspect that turned me off where, I didn't even entertain it. Wish they would show a regular family doing less extreme, everyday things. Then again, it likely would not yield the ratings = no show! Haircuts and some other aspects, I agree, even implement. However, the guy with his anniversary (I did see something about that on a website), had me feeling pretty sad for the wife. Really, I'd rather get a hug and kiss than have been presented with that. It's not about what you spend. With that said, they way that he went about it (or the way TLC edited or maybe even encouraged an extreme version of his behavior) was really degrading, in a way. And now.. forever on film. Go pick flowers out in nature or buy a seed packet and plant some for her but seriously, dumpster dive for one battered rose that smells like trash? And how about write a love letter vs. using the same card over and over again :( Extreme couponers, I also would not watch. I also like to save money on groceries, cook most meals at home. However, this notion of making it a full time job, getting up a midnight when the sales start, and shoving stuff into corners, would not bring much peace to our lives. I fully understand and have been there with those that were going through financial hardships. However, I think they could find savings in growing some of their food, eating more simple meals, drinking water, etc. Then again, maybe they'd think that was extreme? :)

Mrs-M
10-18-12, 9:54am
SimpleL. Just want to take this moment to extend a warm-welcome your way! So happy to have you!

The clincher for me re: the NEW series... the man who flushes his toilet paper once a week! What ever that entails... but I thought to myself, "I refuse to lower myself to watch/entertain the likes of such disgusting material".

I totally agree with you that if they had true-blue frugal, simple, penny-pinching families on, I'd more than likely tune-in regularly to watch, but this nonsense, ugh-uh.

danna
10-18-12, 10:14am
Watched it last night....and there is not much good to report except it is about Extreme people. Very, very OCD.

Why these women stay with these men is beyond me...the one works gives him the money which he refuses to spend.
He shows that he has lots of money in the bank but, it looks like he is taking things from his workplace.

Only a good watch for a laugh or cry however it strikes you on the day...................

Mrs-M
10-18-12, 10:18am
Originally posted by Danna.
Watched it last night....and there is not much good to reportI figured as much... Thanks for the review. :)

creaker
10-18-12, 11:07am
If P.T. Barnam was alive and working today, he would be producing shows like this.

Weston
10-18-12, 11:12am
Spartana - Thanks for posting that link. I really enjoyed the video. While I would never, ever want to take things to that extreme, the gentleman seems genuinely happy and at peace. I also really respect that he takes responsibility for the negative impact it had upon his ex-wife and children.

Obviously, it is hard to know the full story from just one short video piece but he reminds me very much of a colleague who came to see me several months after he had been disbarred, lost his house and gone through a divorce. I was dreading seeing him because I was expecting to converse with a depressed and broken man.

When he actually showed he was quite the opposite. Happy and free. Looking like the weight of a thousand tons had been lifted off of his shoulders. At first I thought he might be on medication but after half an hour I became convinced that he was just finally and deliriously free of his own (and others) expectations of what lifestyle he should lead.

SimplyL
10-18-12, 12:10pm
Thank so much for the welcome, Mrs. M.

Creaker - I agree.

Thanks for the tips on PBS programming, to the person a few posts back that posted it. If anyone recalls Pioneer House? or something to that effect, that was pretty interesting. Again, extreme in that nature of programming where they pulled a family from their normal enviro and placed them in a cabin or hmm, maybe another season it was a home in England (brownstone) where they were scrubbing things down by hand with old fashioned cleaners, washing their hair with (was it Lye? soap). That was pretty interesting yet I took it as more educational, even though it had that reality programming element. This was a few or more years ago, so it probably did not have that 'loosely scripted' reality approach that we see in today's programming. Though, no doubt, the concept of 'Hey, we're sticking you guys out here in the middle of Winter and you're going to build your own cabin' was there..

Mrs-M
10-19-12, 5:03am
You are very welcome, SimplyL. P.S. Love your avatar!

Mrs-M
10-26-12, 2:56pm
http://cdn.buzznet.com/assets/users16/armenatoyan/default/economics-teacher-ferris-buellers-day--large-msg-130869842136.jpg

Anyone? Anyone?

Anyone else care to come vent and share your take Re: the new season of EC?

Spoony
10-30-12, 6:37pm
http://cdn.buzznet.com/assets/users16/armenatoyan/default/economics-teacher-ferris-buellers-day--large-msg-130869842136.jpg

Anyone? Anyone?

Anyone else care to come vent and share your take Re: the new season of EC?

Why couldn't they have a show that portrayed frugal people living "rich", full lives, but spending considerably less than "normal"? I see spots on TV occasionally that show people's ingenious ways to cut costs, yet still have what they want and need to satisfy their families. Maybe some aspects of repurposing, thrift shopping, saving money on groceries, and some simple living ideas? Even showing how much money can be made from selling unused/unwanted items would be interesting to many people.

MaryHu
10-30-12, 8:52pm
Simply L: you're thinking of the 1940's house which showed how people lived in Great Britain during WWII with all the rationing etc. Or maybe you're thinking of the 1900 house where they showed how the British lived at the turn of the century. Both good shows in my opinion.

Tiam
10-30-12, 9:30pm
This show just irritated me. I think it's designed to make people look at them like idiots. War time farm is also a great one. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PR2no9foSmk

catherine
4-2-13, 5:42am
Resurrecting this... I just saw two episodes back-to-back last night. (DH went to bed before me for once).

One was the NYC finance girl who invited her friend and his gf over for a dumpster-dive dinner.
The other was the "millionaire" who pees in a jar so she only has to flush once a day.

I agree with everyone here: I think the producers had them amp up their "cheapskateness" to sensationalize it. The NYC girl who had shorts from 1998 that she held up with a binder clip--come on. I kept thinking, even if I were that cheap I could probably dress myself and furnish a place nicer that that.

But I was also intrigued by the reactions by the friends, which were also probably manufactured to some extent to capture all kinds of negative reactions like disgust.

I also watched the video that Spartana posted a few posts back--that was interesting, too. The guy was almost like Tolstoy the way he rejected materialism drastically and thereby drove a wedge in his relationship. It's too bad it messed up his marriage. Do you think he was too extreme, or following his heart? And do you think his marriage breakup was inevitable, or do you think it's possible to compromise with a SO if you're going to go that extreme? This guy was almost as extreme as Daniel Suelo (http://www.zerocurrency.blogspot.com/), the Moneyless Man who was subject of a book by Mark Sundeen last year.

So, bottom line, Extreme Cheapstake is fun for entertainment value, but I agree with one of the posters who said that it gives frugality a bad name.

Gregg
4-2-13, 7:58am
Why couldn't they have a show that portrayed frugal people living "rich", full lives...

There just isn't enough drama in happiness. Contentment snoozes, drama sells.

Spartana
4-4-13, 10:30am
Resurrecting this... I just saw two episodes back-to-back last night. (DH went to bed before me for once).

One was the NYC finance girl who invited her friend and his gf over for a dumpster-dive dinner.
The other was the "millionaire" who pees in a jar so she only has to flush once a day.

I agree with everyone here: I think the producers had them amp up their "cheapskateness" to sensationalize it. The NYC girl who had shorts from 1998 that she held up with a binder clip--come on. I kept thinking, even if I were that cheap I could probably dress myself and furnish a place nicer that that.

But I was also intrigued by the reactions by the friends, which were also probably manufactured to some extent to capture all kinds of negative reactions like disgust.

I also watched the video that Spartana posted a few posts back--that was interesting, too. The guy was almost like Tolstoy the way he rejected materialism drastically and thereby drove a wedge in his relationship. It's too bad it messed up his marriage. Do you think he was too extreme, or following his heart? And do you think his marriage breakup was inevitable, or do you think it's possible to compromise with a SO if you're going to go that extreme? This guy was almost as extreme as Daniel Suelo (http://www.zerocurrency.blogspot.com/), the Moneyless Man who was subject of a book by Mark Sundeen last year.

So, bottom line, Extreme Cheapstake is fun for entertainment value, but I agree with one of the posters who said that it gives frugality a bad name.I haven't seen the extreme cheapskate show yet (no cable 'cause I'm a .... cheapskate :-)!) but I did watch that video I posted again and tryed to find an update on the guy but couldn't. I am very fasinated by him - and people like him - who are into extreme minimalism (which can be very different than extreme cheapskateness) and love to read about them. The extreme cheapskates, especially the packrat cheapskates, seem too.... er... odd sometimes to me. Or maybe that's just the way the way they are depicted in the media for entertainment. To watch a show on an extreme minimalist like Peace Pilgrim would be inspirational rather than shock-value entertainment.

As far as the guy and his wife breaking up, I don't think that they could survive his extreme minimalism even if she was more of a down to earth person with few wants or needs. He was just too extremely minimalist I think.

Tiam
9-20-13, 11:40pm
I've never been a couponer. Just can't seem to dedicate myself to it, and most of the products are foods I don't use, like Kraft box dinners, or cereals, or taco shells or refrigerated biscuits. Good thing! Right? I've got enough clutter to deal with! On the other hand I could do with a good bit of cheapskating in some areas. I can be wasteful when I am not thinking about it.

try2bfrugal
9-21-13, 9:44am
I've never been a couponer. Just can't seem to dedicate myself to it, and most of the products are foods I don't use, like Kraft box dinners, or cereals, or taco shells or refrigerated biscuits. Good thing! Right? I've got enough clutter to deal with! On the other hand I could do with a good bit of cheapskating in some areas. I can be wasteful when I am not thinking about it.

For me I have not found cutting manufacturers coupons a good ROI on my time, but I do save a lot signing up for store rewards cards and getting coupons that way.

DH started looking panicky at Fresh and Easy the other day because I was using so many coupons, he thought they'd have some kind of limit and we were going to get in trouble. But they were all store coupons they sent me through email, and I was stock piling stuff and they didn't have any limits on how many times you could use each coupon. With the coupons for products like F&E simmer and pasta sauces, they have only natural ingredients and I can't really make them much cheaper than I can buy theirs for, especially when I add in my time and energy costs for the cooking.

And at Safeway I get coupons or personalized prices on my club card on whole foods like tea, yogurt, meat and fresh fruit. My last trip to Safeway added up to 37% off the regular store prices, which compares favorably to Costco, except I could buy everything in normal size packages and use the self service scanner for a quick in and out shopping trip. Plus I have rewards points for 80 cents off a gallon on a tank of gas.