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simple living life
6-10-12, 1:18pm
hi.
here me and my spouse LOVE Dave Ramsey!
We've paid our apartment loans off!
tanks Dave for sharing !

Proverbs 4:4-4:7

Hold on to my words;
follow my commandments you will live.
acquire wisdom, acquire understanding,
never forget what I said and do not stray from it.
abandon not wisdom, she will guard you;
love her, she will protect you.
wisdom most importantly, get wisdom;
give everything you own to acquire insight.

catherine
6-10-12, 1:25pm
Yes! I've been on DR's TMMO since October 2009. I've paid off $118,266 in Baby Step 2 debt in that amount of time. I listen to his podcast all the time.

fidgiegirl
6-10-12, 2:03pm
Welcome, simple living life!

I too am a big DR fan. It helped me and DH pay off our debt. We have a little again now that we moved and are formulating our attack plan largely based on DR's advice.

simple living life
6-10-12, 4:32pm
Yes! I've been on DR's TMMO since October 2009. I've paid off $118,266 in Baby Step 2 debt in that amount of time. I listen to his podcast all the time.
ok nice!

simple living life
6-10-12, 4:36pm
Welcome, simple living life!

I too am a big DR fan. It helped me and DH pay off our debt. We have a little again now that we moved and are formulating our attack plan largely based on DR's advice.
Hi kelli.
ok.sounds good,vi trying to buy without loans.the car was buying CASH for 16.698,21 USD = 120.000SEK.

bunnys
6-10-12, 4:36pm
I don't listen to him but have. I should listen to him more. His words (to a large degree) inspired me to pay the last $7500 of my credit card debt off and also enabled me to think I could save and pay cash for a new car--I did and will buy said car this summer.

I'm not really a fan of all the religious (read: Christian) Biblical messages he uses to make his points. There are a lot of non-Christian and non-religious people who could benefit from his message but it's a little off-putting. It's not too distracting but it's a little annoying and at times he does sound a little judgmental of people. But on the balance, he is pretty helpful.

simple living life
6-10-12, 4:38pm
I don't listen to him but have. I should listen to him more. His words (to a large degree) inspired me to pay the last $7500 of my credit card debt off and also enabled me to think I could save and pay cash for a new car--I did and will buy said car this summer.

I'm not really a fan of all the religious (read: Christian) Biblical messages he uses to make his points. There are a lot of non-Christian and non-religious people who could benefit from his message but it's a little off-putting. It's not too distracting but it's a little annoying and at times he does sound a little judgmental of people. But on the balance, he is pretty helpful.
i`m not a christian,but i think some bible verses are good anyway! did you read #5?

bunnys
6-10-12, 4:50pm
i`m not a christian,but i think some bible verses are good anyway! did you read #5?

That's true. I meant to say it at the end of my post but forgot. There is a lot of wise stuff in the Bible.

Post #5? Yes. But I didn't understand the shorthand at the end.

Kestrel
6-10-12, 6:48pm
I sometimes listen to Dave Ramsey, have his books, subscribed to his site ($89!), but won't renew. Considered taking his class. DH and I are 100% debt free and have been for about 10 years (nothing to do with DR), but we do use our credit card a lot (a big no-no, I know) just because of the points, but it we pay it off each month; no problem. I understand it's a discipline thing, but it's a convenience. I do need the financial reinforcement that he and others bring, however (but not the Christian stuff; but what the heck, I ignore it), so will continue to "use" him ;). I enjoy the budgeting stuff :)

simple living life
6-10-12, 7:40pm
That's true. I meant to say it at the end of my post but forgot. There is a lot of wise stuff in the Bible.

Post #5? Yes. But I didn't understand the shorthand at the end.
the shorthand in the end is that we buy a 16.000dollar car for CASH.
and 16.000dollar is 120.000swedish kronor(SEK)

simple living life
6-10-12, 7:42pm
I sometimes listen to Dave Ramsey, have his books, subscribed to his site ($89!), but won't renew. Considered taking his class. DH and I are 100% debt free and have been for about 10 years (nothing to do with DR), but we do use our credit card a lot (a big no-no, I know) just because of the points, but it we pay it off each month; no problem. I understand it's a discipline thing, but it's a convenience. I do need the financial reinforcement that he and others bring, however (but not the Christian stuff; but what the heck, I ignore it), so will continue to "use" him ;). I enjoy the budgeting stuff :)

but if you think,you didnt NEED a creditcard,right? put aside money insted of supporting the banks...

lhamo
6-11-12, 8:32am
I like Dave for the motivational factor, though I don't share his worldview/belief system. It still makes me smile every time I listen to one of his podcasts and hear those "We're debt free!" screams. I also am quite enjoying the EntreLeadership podcasts, though the guys who host them are not as polished/engaging as Dave -- they have interviewed some great people, though, and I am getting a lot out of hearing their ideas about the importance of cultivating a strong company culture, focusing on the positive, etc. I think my own attitude about my job and how to improve my own performance and that of my team has changed incredibly for the positive since I started listening to those podcasts. Yes, they talk a lot about the fact that their company is based on Christian principals, and that might bug some people -- but I just put my organization's secular humanism and belief in human potential at the core and the same stuff applies.

I understand the ban on credit cards for those who have struggled with debt, but we never have and they are an important and useful tool for us, so that part I just ignore.

lhamo

simple living life
6-11-12, 8:56am
I like Dave for the motivational factor, though I don't share his worldview/belief system. It still makes me smile every time I listen to one of his podcasts and hear those "We're debt free!" screams. I also am quite enjoying the EntreLeadership podcasts, though the guys who host them are not as polished/engaging as Dave -- they have interviewed some great people, though, and I am getting a lot out of hearing their ideas about the importance of cultivating a strong company culture, focusing on the positive, etc. I think my own attitude about my job and how to improve my own performance and that of my team has changed incredibly for the positive since I started listening to those podcasts. Yes, they talk a lot about the fact that their company is based on Christian principals, and that might bug some people -- but I just put my organization's secular humanism and belief in human potential at the core and the same stuff applies.

I understand the ban on credit cards for those who have struggled with debt, but we never have and they are an important and useful tool for us, so that part I just ignore.

lhamo
hi.
im 35 yrs old and i have never own a credit card,i have a visa DEBIT card,works really fine,when you dont have money,you cant buy!
simple as that. never had any debt. when i was young i had to work at home for money.
cook, wash, clean, trim hedges, mow the lawn, watering, washing laundry ..
that im grateful for,that have learn me the value of money.

artist
6-11-12, 9:15am
Dh and I are on doing Dave's plan and we have taken part in teaching FPU. (Financial Peace University). We are currently on Baby step #5. For those not familiar with Dave: Baby step #1 is save $1000 as a baby emergency fund. Step #2 Pay off all debt (not including the house), Step #3 Save up 3-6 months of living expenses in a fully funded emergency fund. Step #4 is to put 15% of your income into retirement funding each year. Step #5 is to save up for college, Step #6 is to pay off the house and Step #7 is to build wealth.

We reached step #5 in August of my son's senior year of high school. I was laid off that same year. So our goal has been to help him out as much as we can with college. We can't pay it all and don't plan to. We agreed to $5000 a year which is half his tuition a year. He has to do books and room and board himself. School is 964 miles away so he can't live at home and the only school in our area for his major is $40,000 a year which he can't afford, even with the scholarship they offered him. There are some closer, but they price out a little more so once we pay for travel to his current school, the cost is a wash.. so no point in going to a closer school to save on travel expenses.

Baby step #6 is the one I'm looking forward to actively working on. Our low income doesn't allow for a lot of wiggle/saving room and we are managing repairs to house and car with cash, so once we are done helping with college... we can put the energy on the mortgage.

simple living life
6-11-12, 9:53am
Dh and I are on doing Dave's plan and we have taken part in teaching FPU. (Financial Peace University). We are currently on Baby step #5. For those not familiar with Dave: Baby step #1 is save $1000 as a baby emergency fund. Step #2 Pay off all debt (not including the house), Step #3 Save up 3-6 months of living expenses in a fully funded emergency fund. Step #4 is to put 15% of your income into retirement funding each year. Step #5 is to save up for college, Step #6 is to pay off the house and Step #7 is to build wealth.

We reached step #5 in August of my son's senior year of high school. I was laid off that same year. So our goal has been to help him out as much as we can with college. We can't pay it all and don't plan to. We agreed to $5000 a year which is half his tuition a year. He has to do books and room and board himself. School is 964 miles away so he can't live at home and the only school in our area for his major is $40,000 a year which he can't afford, even with the scholarship they offered him. There are some closer, but they price out a little more so once we pay for travel to his current school, the cost is a wash.. so no point in going to a closer school to save on travel expenses.

Baby step #6 is the one I'm looking forward to actively working on. Our low income doesn't allow for a lot of wiggle/saving room and we are managing repairs to house and car with cash, so once we are done helping with college... we can put the energy on the mortgage.
like i said im a low income,and step #5 is not relevant for us.
step #6 was done last year(apartment ) bought for 41.745,52 USD
so now we are at step #7 saving towards a house.