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Thread: Cost of my Graduate Degree today

  1. #1
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Cost of my Graduate Degree today

    Given all of the other chat on the other thread about college costs, I was curious to know how much my graduate degree would cost today. Here it is:

    Cost of My Graduate Degree Today: requires 42 semester hours

    Tuition $15,564
    Books ? $2,500 ?
    _________________
    Total $18,064

    This is the cost of my degree at today’s rates. One could always spend more, however. My estimate for books may be low.

  2. #2
    rodeosweetheart
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    A comparable degree to mine (the university changed its program so it admits only to the PHD program now) would cost $47,736.

    That is for same subject area, same time, same credits.

    I think I paid around $9000?

    I then got a free ride for my PhD, a full fellowship.

    And here's the rub--I make less when I teach as an adjunct now, in real dollars, than I did in 1980 when I started teaching as an adjunct. The courses pay about 500 dollars less per semester.

  3. #3
    Low Tech grunt iris lily's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodeosweetheart View Post
    A comparable degree to mine (the university changed its program so it admits only to the PHD program now) would cost $47,736.

    That is for same subject area, same time, same credits.

    I think I paid around $9000?

    I then got a free ride for my PhD, a full fellowship.

    And here's the rub--I make less when I teach as an adjunct now, in real dollars, than I did in 1980 when I started teaching as an adjunct. The courses pay about 500 dollars less per semester.
    Thanks the gods I wasn't PhD material, that would have been costly.

    DH has a master's plus 30. He was dancing around the PhD program only because he was waiting for me to make up my mind whether to marry him or not. His major adviser was unhappy with his lack of dedication to academics and yes,that is true, he was only there until we got married and skipped town for my next career move.

    Today he earns his living in an entirely different field, one that he taught himself. But it was so cool that he financed his Master's degree himself with a fellowship. No debt and when he got that master's degree he had $100,000 net worth from the days when he made cat food in a factory. DH is one of the coolest guys in the world--he's like McGuiver (teevee reference.).On a desert island you want him with you--he will build stuff, analyze botanical plants (his advanced degree) for consumption and he can cook it all up in a pan after bringing it home. Like that old tv add, remember ? haha

  4. #4
    rodeosweetheart
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    " No debt and when he got that master's degree he had $100,000 net worth from the days when he made cat food in a factory. DH is one of the coolest guys in the world--he's like McGuiver (teevee reference.).On a desert island you want him with you--he will build stuff, analyze botanical plants (his advanced degree) for consumption and he can cook it all up in a pan after bringing it home. Like that old tv add, remember ? haha"

    That is so sweet, a real love story. And it made me think of that old SNL where they are on the desert island and the girl gives the guy the watch--she smelted the metal, and he gives her something like a rock??
    Anyway, I think it is amazing that he had a net worth of $100,000 from the cat food factory!! And no wonder you are so in love with him, if he is a botanist--a marriage made in Eden!

  5. #5
    Senior Member lhamo's Avatar
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    Looks like tuition and fees alone would be $15k/year for graduate studies in the humanities/social sciences at my alma mater.

    I was in grad school (MA and Ph.D) from September 1992 to September 1999. Had fellowships or teaching/research assistantships the entire way through, which provided a tuition waiver as well as a decent living stipend. Graduated 100% debt free, and that included paying for a good portion of my DH's living expenses out of my funding after we got serious/got married -- he had a few fellowships, but not as good/steady as mine.

    Love that you have a McGyver DH, IL!!!! one of my all time favorite shows...
    "Seek out habits that help you overcome fear or inertia. Destroy those that do the opposite." Seth Godin

  6. #6
    Senior Member jp1's Avatar
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    I didn't go to grad school so I can only compare my undergrad degree then and now. Tuition then (1986 freshman year) $325/hour or $11,700 per year for tuition. Room and board, on campus, approximately $4,000/year. I had scholarships so I didn't actually pay tuition. Today, according to their website, $43,000 annual tuition and $12,700 for room and board.

    According to the BLS inflation calculator the 1986 price of tuition, room and board in today's dollars would be $33,508. I sincerely doubt the kids today will get twice as much value from their education as I have from mine.

  7. #7
    Low Tech grunt iris lily's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rodeosweetheart View Post
    " .... And it made me think of that old SNL where they are on the desert island and the girl gives the guy the watch--she smelted the metal, and he gives her something like a rock??
    I know, I remember that one, too! So funny!

  8. #8
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    I'm glad I got my education while the getting was good. I feel bad for today's kids. First they have to acquire a mountain of debt just to get a bachelor's degree, and then try to find a decent-paying job in this crappy economy.

    I was lucky. My parents paid for my undergrad tuition, and I always had teaching assistantships and fellowships for the MA and PhD. I had a bit of student loan debt, but it was trivial compared to what I'm seeing with young folks now.

    Still, there are things young people can do, such as starting at a community college and then transferring to the best four-year school you can get into--nobody's ever going to ask where you spent your first two years.

    And the skilled trades are looking better and better for a lot of kids. I taught at several different colleges in adjunct and contract positions before I stopped beating my head against the academic brick wall, and it was clear to me that a significant number of my students would have been more suited--and probably happier--as plumbers, electricians, mechanics, etc. And those are jobs that can't be offshored.

  9. #9
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    I went to a Calif State University (and a Calif Community College for 2 years before) and this is the current 2013/2014 cost:

    "All students enrolling at the CSU pay the systemwide Tuition Fee which is currently $5,472 per academic year for undergraduate students enrolling in more than 6 units per term and $3,174 for undergraduates enrolling in 6 or fewer units. The 2013-14 Tuition Fee for students enrolled in postbaccalaureate teacher preparations programs for a Multiple Subject, Single Subject, or Special Education credential is $6,348 for students enrolled in more than 6 units and $3,684 for students taking 6 units or less. Students enrolled in graduate programs and other postbaccalaureate students pay a Tuition Fee of $6,738 for more than 6 units and $3,906 for those enrolling in 6 or fewer units."

    Add in a few hundred for books (I bought mine used for MUCH less cost and then re-sold them when I was done) and housing costs (if any) and I think it can still be pretty inexpensive. Most people can work a part time job, live with the parents or get a cheap shared housing set up, to pay for most, if not all, of the costs each year. You don't need an expensive private school or a huge student loan debt to get an education. For myself, did some of my undergrad stuff while I was in the coast guard, and then I worked full time while in school after I got out at around age 30 when I went to school full time. I had my GI benefits to pay for much of my education also but it would have been affordable for me even if I didn't have that.

    I will add that even though my college education probably helped me, it was actually my military education and training that landed me a good civilian job. And that done cost me 'nuttin'! Heck they even paid me!

  10. #10
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Here is an update from this 2014 post:

    Looks like grad school prices havent risen. The MLIS program in my state university put it right out there, the cost of that degree is $16,900. Then add books, another ?$2,000? So, $19,000 pretty much the same as my estimate 4 years ago.

    https://online.missouri.edu/degreepr...ience/masters/

    Live on campus for a year, no car, rent a room. Should be able do that fairly easily for $17,000. Oh wait, this is online degree—living arrangements might be cheaper.

    Total cost of this year of graduate school, $34, 000.

    Get the degree, move to a place that will employ you, pay off loan in 3 years if you continue to live like a graduate student.
    Last edited by iris lilies; 10-6-18 at 8:07pm.

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