Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 42

Thread: pet peeve!!!

  1. #31
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    6,248
    Quote Originally Posted by Rachel View Post
    Why did someone tell you that you were "unpromotable?" Because you don't speak the local slang? That is a terrible thing to say to an employee or a colleague. I am mad for your sake!
    .

    Not based on language at all, I was not considered ready for a job that came up because one aspect is that you need to have a background managing multiple sites succesfully, the job in between what I am doing and that job will come open when someone dies or retires, and the structure is changed so my level only manages one site so there isn't a way to build those in between skills. The discussion about not getting an interview did not give me steps to take to get where I wanted to be, and the person who talked to me about not getting an interview basically said she had to move to a new organization in order to move up. So it wasn't that I wasn't capable so much as there was not going to be opportunities where I was at.

  2. #32
    rodeosweetheart
    Guest
    Interestingly, "ain't" was quite acceptable in upper class English speech in the 18th and 19th century, probably passing away in the late 19th century.. .

  3. #33
    Low Tech grunt iris lily's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    4,942
    Quote Originally Posted by rodeosweetheart View Post
    Interestingly, "ain't" was quite acceptable in upper class English speech in the 18th and 19th century, probably passing away in the late 19th century.. .
    I remember seeing that in English novels representing 19th century speech!

  4. #34
    Senior Member mira's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    543
    There's a lot of "I seen/done" and "I have went" in my part of the world. I didn't grow up here so it stands out like a sore thumb to me. Drives me up the wall. Even the most educated and influential of people speak like this.

    Another one here is saying "Me and Joe went..." or "This is a photo of Suzy and I"... learn the difference between subject and object!!!

    As for "Do you want to come with?", do you think this structure may be derived from German? e.g. "Kommst du mit?"

  5. #35
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Phoenix
    Posts
    2,777
    My secretary has reformed me over the last 5 years. In rural ohio everyone says "where's that at?" I now say "where is that?" And now I cringe when someone else puts "at" at the end of a sentence. I talked this way, with a masters degree, never knowing it was wrong.

    Change can happen after 50.

  6. #36
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    6,248
    I went to a mediation training today and it was heaven! The training was excellent AND the trainer was excellent in her speech. Hardly any 'um', not one 'like' and accurate language that was presented to us as if we were very competent adults. So a sentence that stood out was "In relational mediation it would be best to do …" Rather than "when parties know each other and have to get along for a long time". Both sentences are fine however I felt so much better, so much SMARTER being addressed the first way. Then we spent a long time on the very careful writing styles that are important in writing mediation agreements.

    A little off topic but I noticed that I simplify my language quite often around the people I work with and for.

  7. #37
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    12,768
    Quote Originally Posted by Tammy View Post
    My secretary has reformed me over the last 5 years. In rural ohio everyone says "where's that at?" I now say "where is that?" And now I cringe when someone else puts "at" at the end of a sentence. I talked this way, with a masters degree, never knowing it was wrong.

    Change can happen after 50.
    Yeah, that old ending-a-sentence-with-a-preposition faux pas. Classic. It can be awkward sometimes, trying to avoid it. There was some famous writer, either George Bernard Shaw or Mark Twain, whose editor chided him for ending a sentence with a preposition, and his response, reportedly, was "That's the kind of nonsense up with which I will not put."
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
    www.silententry.wordpress.com

  8. #38
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Always logged in
    Posts
    20,698
    agreed, the ending-a-preposition thing is less egregious than saying "me and him." I will sometimes talk the preposition at end, seldom write it, and certainly not in formal writing situations which, granted, any more, are rare.

  9. #39
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Phoenix
    Posts
    2,777
    "At" was the only proposition with which I struggled. How odd.

  10. #40
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    SoCal
    Posts
    9,126
    Change can happen after 50.
    oh so it finally becomes possible at that age (change that is)?

    sorry that's how I actually originally read that sentence. Though reading it again, I suppose the more conventional assumption is that people mostly change (grammar or whatever I guess) when younger.
    Trees don't grow on money

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •