Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Air Force Salvages Old Plane Out Of Salvage Yard To Reuse It.....

  1. #1
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1,187

    Air Force Salvages Old Plane Out Of Salvage Yard To Reuse It.....

    Maybe someone can help me some, and post a link. I think this is good news. Every time there is a crash, the pot-stirring(not liberal) news media makes a point of reporting the age of the aircraft, even though it is rarely a factor in the accident. They are very consumeristic, because: A) Newspapers & Magazines make their revenue advertising big-ticket merchandise and promoting more consumption; B) Most professional journalists are too unhandy to even change a light bulb. It's a trait that seems to coincide with that particular mental skillset. They have deep distrust of all things mechanical & have trouble conceptualizing how things work. They don't CARE if a Prius is built to last, because they trade frequently, anyway. Way they are.

  2. #2
    Senior Member bae's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Offshore
    Posts
    8,513
    The most common commercial plane I fly on is a de Havilland Beaver. They were built from 1947 to 1967, and are still going strong. I flew in one last month that looked like it had just come from the factory.

  3. #3
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1,187
    Quote Originally Posted by bae View Post
    The most common commercial plane I fly on is a de Havilland Beaver. They were built from 1947 to 1967, and are still going strong. I flew in one last month that looked like it had just come from the factory.
    Good, good to hear that you ain't skeered!

  4. #4
    Senior Member kib's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Southeast Arizona
    Posts
    2,570
    Well we have what must be the biggest airplane salvage yard in the country here in Tucson, so apparently the gubmint thinks this will be a good idea ... some day ... when we're no longer a new product consumer society ... ???

    http://www.artificialowl.net/2008/05...rd-tucson.html

  5. #5
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1,187
    Well, one night when I wasn't wearing my tinfoil hat, I intercepted a secret message that said the gubmint is saving those old planes to pull out of the wreckin' yard to use as kamikaze planes, if it ever comes down to it. They don't need to be anywhere near 100% reliable for military use in wartime; just need to make it to the target with a payload, or at the very least-- crash in enemy territory and "accidentally" hit a school or hospital. This will demoralize the enemy, Save American Lives and Protect Freedom. Mission Accomplished. See?
    Last edited by Packy; 2-23-15 at 6:11pm.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Phoenix
    Posts
    2,310
    Packy I'm starting to enjoy your humor. No I didn't block you. I gave you a second chance.

  7. #7
    Senior Member kib's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Southeast Arizona
    Posts
    2,570
    Quote Originally Posted by Packy View Post
    Well, one night when I wasn't wearing my tinfoil hat, I intercepted a secret message that said the gubmint is saving those old planes to pull out of the wreckin' yard to use as kamikaze planes, if it ever comes down to it. They don't need to be anywhere near 100% reliable for military use in wartime; just need make it to the target with a payload, or at the very least-- crash in enemy territory and "accidentally" hit a school or hospital. This will demoralize the enemy, saving American Lives and Protect Freedom. Mission Accomplished. See?
    Thank heavens we're so prepared.

  8. #8
    Banned
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1,187
    Quote Originally Posted by bae View Post
    The most common commercial plane I fly on is a de Havilland Beaver. They were built from 1947 to 1967, and are still going strong. I flew in one last month that looked like it had just come from the factory.
    I read the Wikipedia article about the de Havilland Beaver. It said that there were still hundreds in use as "Bush Planes"; and that upgrades had been developed to keep them flying awhile longer, though some engine parts were getting in short supply. The downside is, during the 20-year production run, 16-1700 of them were built; and there have been 404 reported fatalities in them in approximately 150-160 incidents, since. It is not the aircrafts' fault for so many casualties; it is the flying applications: using them as bush planes in remote areas on barely-adequate airstrips or as float planes under harsh conditions can be very hazardous. Hope that helps you some. Thank mee.
    Last edited by Packy; 3-16-15 at 1:10am.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •