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Thread: Sea vegetables, anyone?

  1. #1
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Sea vegetables, anyone?

    I just made a large pot of enhanced crack slaw*, trying to include as many nutrient-dense ingredients as possible--kale, spinach, carrots, four different colors of peppers, turmeric, LOTS of garlic--when I rediscovered a dusty little bag of hiziki (hijiki) in a corner of the pantry. I soaked it as per instructions, and added it with sambal oelek as a garnish. It blended right into the slaw and gave me a little boost of iodine. I have another kind of sea vegetable around here (dulse?) that I've never tried. Anyone else use sea vegetables?



    http://www.food.com/recipe/crack-slaw-low-carb-434863

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    Thanks for the link to the recipe. It almost looks like a spring tonic in a bowl .

    I followed the Macrobiotic Diet for awhile back in the 1980's and that's when I was introduced to sea vegetables, and still use many of them today. Kelp is the one I use most often (https://www.seaveg.com/shop/) because it comes in a handy shaker and it's easy to sprinkle on food and looks like black pepper, so no one is the wiser. I also use kombu, wakame or dulse in soup stocks - whichever one I happen to have on hand. I add kombu to beans. Since I don't use iodized salt, and haven't for over 30-years, this is our main source for iodine, and it's also a better source than iodized salt.

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    I love sea vegetables too! I have a yummy recipe for a vegetarian version of 'bouillabaisse' with kombu, hijiki and wakame, tofu, and chopped tomatoes. To die for!

    Dulse is beautiful and very delicate, I use it simply washed and revived in water, then strained in rice or pasta salads.

    I try not to eat seaweed too often though, as I remember reading / being told somewhere that having too much iodine can be really bad for you - did you ever hear this? I'm not sure if it's true.

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    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    I've read the opposite--that especially in non-coastal people, or people who shun seafood (like me)--deficiencies, particularly subclinical ones, are common. Supposedly you can tell if you're deficient by painting iodine solution on your arm--if it disappears quickly, you're deficient. (Wikipedia) But you can get professionally tested to be sure.

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    Senior Member KayLR's Avatar
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    I have used hijiki and wakame... I liked them, but for some reason it is really hard to find it here. Even at Uwajimaya there was only one kind. I should say, this comment is about fresh or frozen. I can find lots of dried seaweed.
    Last edited by KayLR; 3-4-15 at 2:29pm.
    My therapist told me the way to achieve true inner peace is to finish what I start. So far today, I have finished two bags of M&Ms and a chocolate cake. I feel better already!

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    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    I like roasted seaweed as a snack. It's sold in packages (with entirely too much packaging) at Asian grocery stores and sometimes comes in flavors like wasabi (horseradish). Nice crunch, salty, and good for you. I've never eaten dulse (that I'm aware of); I have eaten wakame as a salad and seaweed (laver) as a wrap for sushi.

    I read an article recently that described sea vegetables as one of the "hot new things" in restaurants this year. I'm looking forward to it, especially if its used outside of an Asian paradigm with which I'm already familiar.
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    Thanks JanetV2.0 - Yes I too had always heard that you should make sure to get enough iodine, and then the opposite.... I've managed to track down the study I think I had been told
    about, it was published in 2011 (so things may have changed about 5 times since ) in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition; you can read the abstract here

    It is a bit like everything, I guess, not overdoing it, I still enjoy my sea vegs...

    SteveinMN, for seaweed outside of Asian paradigm: laverbread, a Welsh delicacy (they call it bara lafwr is Welsh) - I was given some in a tin by a welsh colleague as a joke for the 'secret Santa' in my last job but it turned out I just loved it... According to Wikipedia, Richard Burton would have called it the Welsh man's caviar....

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    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sulevia View Post
    SteveinMN, for seaweed outside of Asian paradigm: laverbread, a Welsh delicacy (they call it bara lafwr is Welsh)
    Thanks, Sulevia! I'm just going to have to try to find some of that. I'll bet someone sells it on-line...
    Success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has overcome. - Booker T. Washington

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    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Such a coincidence, today I ate seaweed at a Chinese buffet place. I thought it was probably seaweed when I put it on my plate, but wasn't sure as I was eating it. It was prepared in long noodle-like forms. It was salty and had been spiced up. I liked it a lot, even though neither DH nor I were sure if it was animal or mineral.

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    Senior Member Blackdog Lin's Avatar
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    We stayed at a Japanese-businessman's-oriented hotel while in Los Angeles 2 years ago. Breakfast was included in the daily rate, you could choose the American-style or Japanese-style, and we availed ourselves of it our last morning. I was in an adventuresome mood so I had the Japanese-style, which included (if memory serves) 4 different types of sea vegetables.

    I loved 3 of the 4, to the point that I asked the waitress to explain to me what I was enjoying. She very nicely tried to explain/give names to the stuff, none of which information I was able to understand or retain.

    DH took one look at my platter, and beyond the tasty-looking rice and fried fish, said "blech!"

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