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Thread: Tell me what you know about pancreatitis

  1. #1
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    Tell me what you know about pancreatitis

    Is it always life threatening? How long can a person live with pancreatitis? Is it treatable?

    Thanks for the info.
    I didn't want to look back at the end of my life or after some great catastrophe and think, 'How happy I used to be then if only I'd realized it.'
    Gretchen Rubin-- The Happiness Project

  2. #2
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    chronic pancreatitis that is.
    I didn't want to look back at the end of my life or after some great catastrophe and think, 'How happy I used to be then if only I'd realized it.'
    Gretchen Rubin-- The Happiness Project

  3. #3
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    Pancreatitis is an inflammation of the pancreas. The pancreas is a large gland behind the stomach and close to the duodenum. The duodenum is the upper part of the small intestine. The pancreas secretes digestive enzymes into the small intestine through a tube called the pancreatic duct. These enzymes help digest fats, proteins, and carbohydrates in food. The pancreas also releases the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream. These hormones help the body use the glucose it takes from food for energyNormally, digestive enzymes do not become active until they reach the small intestine, where they begin digesting food. But if these enzymes become active inside the pancreas, they start "digesting" the pancreas itself.Acute pancreatitis occurs suddenly and lasts for a short period of time and usually resolves. Chronic pancreatitis does not resolve itself and results in a slow destruction of the pancreas. Either form can cause serious complications. In severe cases, bleeding, tissue damage, and infection may occur. Pseudocysts, accumulations of fluid and tissue debris, may also develop. And enzymes and toxins may enter the bloodstream, injuring the heart, lungs, and kidneys, or other organs.

  4. #4
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    I tell you what--pancreatitis is always serious and life-threatening. Risk factors are: alcohol abuse, and a hereditary predisposition for pancreatitis. It is very insidious, because people often do not seek medical attention until they are very ill. It starts out with mild but persistent abdominal pain, and worsens. I know two people that have had it. One, a 75-year old man--he survived because he was regularly seeing his MD for other issues, and got it diagnosed in time, and was hospitalized. . He, is not a drinker. The other victim was a 58-year old woman, obese, inactive and an alcohol abuser. When symptoms appeared, she stayed in bed for several days, thinking it was upset stomach or flu. She had no health coverage. A friend found her dead, at home. It took an autopsy to determine the cause of her death. She probably would be alive, had she realized it was serious enough to warrant a trip to the ER.

  5. #5
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    There is a distinction between pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Pancreatitis is serious, but survivable especially with timely medical intervention. But pancreatic cancer is one of the deadly cancers, with eventual death in nearly 100% of cases.

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the info. Any idea how likely pancreatic cancer is to follow chronic pancreatitis? Can a person survive long term with chronic pancreatitis if its treated? The person I know has been hospitalized twice in the last 5-6 months for treatment.

    From what I'm being told through a third party, this persons chances of survival may be slim.
    I didn't want to look back at the end of my life or after some great catastrophe and think, 'How happy I used to be then if only I'd realized it.'
    Gretchen Rubin-- The Happiness Project

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