Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: Yard Sale - Worth It?

  1. #1
    Senior Member jennipurrr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    767

    Yard Sale - Worth It?

    I have a bunch of junk (working, good condition) that I am either going to donate to the local thrift store or have yard sale. DH and I aren't generally 'stuff' accumulaters, but wow...somehow over the past couple of years we have boxed up a bunch of stuff we don't need anymore. Also, I have been doing some couponing the past few months and when non food items are "better than free" after coupons I toss them in with this stuff. I donate the food items to the food bank here. Aside from "stuff" and clothes we have a working clothes dryer and a changing table (that I dumpster dove a couple years ago, still haven't the desire to have a baby, so its going!).

    We are going on a trip to a friend's wedding in a couple months and I thought it would give us some good spending money. I have received mostly negative comments IRL about the amount of work it takes. So, what has your experience been, is it worth it to have a yard sale?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Rosemary's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    2,598
    When we were getting ready for a cross-country move, we had a big yard sale with a friend. That time it was worth it. In general, though, for me, it is not worth the hassle of labeling items, storing them until the date, and spending 1-3 days sitting around waiting for people to buy stuff.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Gina's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    West coast
    Posts
    844
    In my area yard sales are only on Sat morning, usually 8am to noon, but it takes time to set it up, to make and put up signs on streetcorners, etc.

    If it is worth it depends on the quality of the things you have to sell. People can make hundreds of dollars with good stuff, or far less with stuff a step up from junk.

    I've given about 4 yard sales over the years and made in the range of $100 each. And then I donated most of what was left to thrift store to get rid of it. Was it worth it $ wise? I don't know - it was a lot of work. I shop yard sales and know many of the locals so I had a lot of fun interacting with people I often encounter. If you donate it to a charity instead, you'll get a tax write-off, so whether you actually make much or not above that, I don't know. I just like the yard sale culture.

    I also want to have another sometime this spring. But I've only been saving things to sell that I'll ask a few dollars for, and have been donating 'lesser' stuff that putting out to sell would get me less than a $1, or was simply getting in the way. (I was on a real downsizing spree Nov and Dec.)
    Last edited by Gina; 3-30-11 at 4:25pm.
    moo

  4. #4
    Mrs-M
    Guest
    I say go for it, do a yard sale. Electric dryers in good working order go fast around here, lots of people starting out are looking for something affordable, and as far as the baby changing table goes, seems a lot of new moms nowadays appreciate having one. I can't see why you wouldn't be able to pad your pockets with a couple hundred dollars (or more) just between those two items alone, add in all the other stuff you have and even if not everything sells (which it seldom does) you'll have money in your hand and less stuff to haul away afterwards.

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    21
    We usually combine with friends or family and turn it into a social event. Neighbors stop by to chit chat and trade items amongst each other. We hang out and have lunch together. We don't get crazy with the work or the money - sketch a few signs and hang them up at the end of the road. Keep prices low and whatever doesn't sell get sent to Goodwill or the local thrift store. Not a bad way to earn a little pocket $ and get rid of unwanted junk, I mean stuff!

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    1,095
    I also think your end goal matters. People have yard sales for two reasons: 1) to make money or 2) to get rid of stuff. The people who want to make money run the risk of being disappointed if they price their stuff too high. Your stuff is only worth what someone is willing to pay for it. If you price stuff on the lower side, you might actually make more because people will buy more (and you'll have less to haul away at the end).

  7. #7
    Senior Member jennipurrr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    767
    Thanks for the opinions. I definitely see the main motivation as to get rid of stuff, and the secondary motivation to make a little cash. I think if we can get our act together and finish decluttering, we will try to have one sometime in April. I have a mental goal of $200-300 from it, but who knows if we will get that. I guess the worst that can come of it is we spent time setting up and having it and then we just end up donating the stuff. Either way, it will force us to get these boxes out of the house and give everything a good look over in the house. I spent last night changing out my winter and spring clothes in the closet and have a box of stuff!!! Sometimes it seems like this decluttering stuff is never ending, argh. I don't really know how I let it get this way, as I don't feel like I bring in a lot of extra stuff...but I guess it has been over 5 years since we have moved, so we have just been accumulating since then.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    663
    "So, what has your experience been, is it worth it to have a yard sale? "

    No.
    author of A Holy Errand

  9. #9
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Central Jersey
    Posts
    3,455
    I've had a few garage sales in my day--the last two were spearheaded by my grown daughter (I told her she could keep any money made). They are a lot of work, but on the other hand, it doesn't have to be more than posting signs in the neighborhood the day before, yanking all the stuff out on the front yard/driveway, pricing most things (you can use global signs for books ($1 hardcover/$50 paperback) or "anything in this box for $.25."

    I've made around $200 on them. Frankly, I'm going to have one this spring.... You would be absolutely amazed at what people buy. My MIL used to join us and try to sell brand new towels she had in her attic from when she was a clerk at Macy's. No nibbles. But the old worn 70s chip dishes would go. Yard tools go. Clothes usually go, especially classics. Golf clubs, bikes. Shelving units--even if they're crummy--people buy them for storage in their garages (to store the junk they buy at garage sales, no doubt!)
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
    www.silententry.wordpress.com

  10. #10
    Mrs-M
    Guest
    In reading your entry Catherine a story came to mind. I'm going back some 15 or so years ago in telling this one, but it's worth it IMO. Old neighbours of ours (junk-oholics) put on a yard sale and EVERYTHING was junk! Dirty, filthy, disgusting old used junk! Anyhow, on the last and final day the Mr. started dumping the remains of one picked through box into another, then dumping that picked through box into another, and so on, till he had a series of junk-filled boxes ready for presentation.

    He pasted $2 tags on each box and when the people started showing up the boxes of junk went first. (Nuts, bolts, washers, screws, caps, nails, tape, clips, you name). What got us is, a couple of buyers (shoppers) couldn't run to their vehicles fast enough (boxes in hand) to stow away their finds! I actually find it pathetic.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •