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Thread: Dh has suddenly discovered FIRE

  1. #1
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    Dh has suddenly discovered FIRE



    Early retirement for dh was not something we considered when we were younger, because he envisioned working into his 70’s, and I couldn’t imagine him retired.

    now his attitude toward his job has, um, evolved. And he is eager to retire or at least do something else.

    last night he started telling me about this “new” movement. Again .

    anyway, he did the math, and if we don’t spend any money at all for the next 4 years, he can retire and not work again at 56.

  2. #2
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    Borscht Belt comedian Jackie Mason:
    I have enough money to last me the rest of my life, unless I buy something.
    Getting the message later than sooner is better than not getting the message at all...
    Success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has overcome. - Booker T. Washington

  3. #3
    Senior Member Ultralight's Avatar
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    I have said this before: Your DH is just tired, real tired.

  4. #4
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    The thing is that dh probably could retire now.

    he is the most conservative guy I know. His current plan says he can retire at 60.

    his assumptions include:
    we will both live to our late 90s,
    in this house with all of it’s associated expenses adjusted for 3% inflation.
    Our day to day expenses will stay the same (adjusted for inflation) - no cost savings from his 45 minute commute and he still trades in his car every 5 years. At 90!
    our investments will provide only the minimum rate of return in the range of “reasonable expectations” (based on historic performance)
    we will never inherit anything (his parents are living and own free and clear property worth several million dollars, I don’t know what their liquid assets are - but they believe firmly in treating all offspring equally, and I feel like he could easily count on, say, 50,000 in our 80s )
    once he retires my income will also disappear (I love my job. I only make about 12,000 a year, but that isn’t nothing.)
    our medical expenses will steadily increase based on my father, who is the least healthy of our parents (and unlikely to see his 90s.)

    he does have a chart that tells him how much the company buy out would have to be (if there is another round) in a table indicating 6 month increments, to allow him to retire before 60.

    if there is another round, I am going to push really hard for him to take it. No matter when or what it is.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chicken lady View Post


    Early retirement for dh was not something we considered when we were younger, because he envisioned working into his 70’s, and I couldn’t imagine him retired.

    now his attitude toward his job has, um, evolved. And he is eager to retire or at least do something else.

    last night he started telling me about this “new” movement. Again .

    anyway, he did the math, and if we don’t spend any money at all for the next 4 years, he can retire and not work again at 56.
    I think this is great news! I remember how happy I was when my husband agreed to go to the Dave Ramsey class with me, and how truly lifechanging it was for us!

    This is a really positive development.

  6. #6
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Yay, good news even if it is just in the ideas stage.

  7. #7
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    Why does your income have to disappear if he retired? You love your job. I could see if you wanted to travel retiring together but you hate traveling. Maybe a part time job that he enjoys would be a good idea for awhile. I still work part time at 64 and love it.

  8. #8
    Williamsmith
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    CL , my wife and I are 59. She works two part time jobs. A teacher’s aid and a preschool teacher. We have had the “retirement” conversation a million times. After fiddlefarting around the topic ad naseum, I have determined.....she will do what she wants, when she wants to....and that’s how it should be. My best to you husband in his decision making.

  9. #9
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    It’s not that he expects me to also “retire”, it’s that he refuses to put my income into his calculations. On the theory that if he has retired, I should also be free to simply announce one day that I am not going to work any more.

    I left my classroom, while my students were engaged in a project, to carry a heavy object down three flights of marble stairs. I told my (teen) class “i’ll be back in a couple of minutes. If i’m not, I probably fell down the stairs, so maybe you should tell the teacher next door.” And one of the boys said “or you found something better to do with your life and left.” I smiled at him and said “highly unlikely.” He responded ”hey, I can hope for good things for you.”

  10. #10
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    I think that’s fine for him not to include it. Since you are a introvert I bet working is good for you. I actually started working more and really enjoying it. I don’t include my consulting in our budget. I do include teaching my class. Kids are so funny!

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