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Thread: How did you resign from your job?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Gardenarian's Avatar
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    How did you resign from your job?

    I am leaving my current job - my last day will be in a month. I'd like to get my letter of resignation in so they can get on with hiring - but on the other hand, I feel there will be some anger about my leaving.

    I've only been at this job for a year and a half and haven't become good friends with anyone. Everyone is quite formal here. At my other jobs, I talked with my co-workers and bosses and they were all aware of my plans and supportive of my reasons for moving on - and we remained friends.

    Did you schedule a meeting with your boss to tell her you were resigning? I have written a draft resignation letter. I thought I'd meet with my boss, explain that my husband and I have bought a B&B (we have!) and that my last day will be at the end of the current semester, and then give her the letter to give to human resources.

    I'm weirdly anxious about this. I would love to hear your experiences.
    "All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given us. -- Gandalf

  2. #2
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    I tendered my resignation in person, and followed it up with a formal letter. I was very angry at the time, because my manager had coerced me into firing a young analyst who had not met his expectations, even though she had met mine--and she was technically my analyst. But she was socially inept and wasn't good at playing the corporate game, and so even though she worked really hard at her "PIP" (performance improvement program) my boss made me fire her.

    So I brought her in to fire her and then told her that I was quitting that day. I didn't draw any parallels, because in truth, it was a number of factors that led to my quitting and hers was just one of them, but I think she got the picture. It just made me so mad that I didn't have any say in the matter, even though it was I who would be working with her and training her, not my boss. Bad management on his part, but in the long run, it worked out great for me.

    Anyway, in spite of what I just told you, just keep it dispassionate. I would simply ask for a meeting with your boss, with the resignation letter in hand, and then present it to them at the meeting. There is no reason for you to feel obligated in any way.
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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  3. #3
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    On January 10 I told my boss that my last day at work would be March 31. We had a regular meeting each week and I told her at one of those meetings. While that did not give her a lot of time, I know how she operates, and I know she would wait until the last minute anyway.


    That's exactly what happened. She didn't start the process to replace me until one week before I was gone. In our meeting I told her that she could tell whoever she wants my news, but because I think lame duck administrators are ineffective, I suggested she keep it to those who must know. I was pushing to complete three projects and I wanted complete authority to make that work. In a perfect world she would have started the process to replace me and everyone would have known I was leaving due to job advertisements etc, and that would have been fine. But that's not how she works, and I could see no point in everyone knowing I was leaving for weeks when she was taking no action.

    The same day I sent email to the head of HR and let him know I was retiring and that news was yet a bit quiet and copied my boss on it. I followed up same day with a hard copy letter to HR.

    Its all just business, so give them the favts which are

    1. I am quitting

    2. My last day of work is XXX

    and say something benign such as "thank you for the opportunity" or
    "I have enjoyed working here. "

  4. #4
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    All the jobs I've had I've written the letter of resignation, met with my boss who usually had an idea that I was planning on moving on and was supportive. My 23 yrs of nursing were all for the same corporation so they really were transfers to other depts. I had one bad one. In radiation oncology I worked with one unbelievably bad nurse, the worst I have ever met, it was to the point something had to be done. I went to my supervisor who never did anything about any of the multiple health code violations. Finally, I interviewed for another dept (I was ready to leave, this nurse just made me make the decision faster) and got that job. I went in to tell the supervisor and the director, both of whom had received an email from me listing all the horrendous things I had seen and that if there was not a correction plan, I would be calling the dept of health. Oh, they were horrible to me, it was bloody and I even had the HR employee rep with me. They called me Hitler. So I said, "surely, we can't have Hitler working here so today is my last day." Which pissed them off more, they called hospice and tried to block me starting there the very next day. They knew the entire story, including the Hitler part and demanded that I start the next day. Hospice took a real chance on me with that background! that was the first and only time I ever complained about a bad nurse, I really felt poor outcomes were occurring with potential for more because of her poor practice. That was my most risky quitting. The nurse had to leave radiation and got shuffled to another hospice as a nurse who made phone calls to MD offices, no patient care. So that worked out.

    I would do exactly what Catherine said

  5. #5
    Senior Member herbgeek's Avatar
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    I've never given more than a 2 week notice, usually I've asked to speak with the boss, handing him/her a written resignation letter that says basically nothing outside of my last day.

    Congrats on buying the B+B- can't wait to hear about your adventures!!!!

  6. #6
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    It was funny that I telegraphed my retirement by blurting out stuff at administrative meetingsfor several years before I left, yet everyone was still surprised!


    About eight years ago it was announced at One of those meetings that we had a new program allowing retired employees to be covered by medical insurance if they paid the entire premium. I blurted out "yay, hey that's my ticket out of here!"ha ha ha.


    A few years before I retired someone at an administrative meeting talked about the rule for pension which was called the rule of 85. That meant a combination of age and years of service had to be met before a pensin was available.I blurted "oh no! I thought it was the rule of 80!" And I laid my head down on the table in faux sorrow at the thought of 2.5 more years of servitude. Ha ha a little drama for my colleagues.

    And then more recently during an admin meeting it was said in a taciturn way that we are no longer allowing retirees to get medical insurance outside of COBRA mandated rules. When I asked about it the head of HR tamped that discussion down. Later he invited me into his office to explain the politics of that decision which was the usual bullshit. I told him " dude I was counting on that!"

    So it should not have come as a surprise when I retired but everyone was surprised. I was the second person to retire out of a group of 10 people who are all about my age within a five year range. They all need to retire.

  7. #7
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    my company promised retirees who had 20 yrs in that they could buy health insurance at the group rate, higher than the employee rate but still a huge benefit. So at 20 yrs, I asked, "you are the only person who asked about that. We are stopping that plan." How could I be the only employee who was upset about losing that benefit? Sometimes I think I worked with the least financially savvy people on the planet.

  8. #8
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    When I left my last job, I told my supervisor during one of my monthly critique performance review sessions. She explained the arcane way HR was conducting performance appraisals that year (it changed every year even though the result for the employee was always the same) and asked me to give her a timetable of when I would have my draft and the final ready. I told her I wasn't planning on getting it done because I was quitting. We negotiated an end date and the tasks I was going to have done by then and I sent a sparsely-worded and official email of resignation to HR (cc her) a couple of days later.

    Short and simple. My boss knew why I left. It became even more apparent when they had to hire two people to do everything I was responsible for. My official line was that I had a golden opportunity to start my own business and most people there still believe that to be true.

    I also declined an exit interview. My experience with them is that they are easy ways to cook one's own goose (legacy and future) and the organization really isn't interested in the feedback anyway because they had plenty of opportunities to hear it while I was working there.
    Success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has overcome. - Booker T. Washington

  9. #9
    Senior Member flowerseverywhere's Avatar
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    I asked to meet with the boss Friday afternoon and gave her a two week notice. It only said please accept my resignation as of date. I gave a vague explanation. The company had gone through two brutal layoffs targeting older people (some were within two years of the 85 retirement number and were going to take a huge hit by not qualifying for health insurance ) and I had become FI and only wanted to pad the bank a little on a part time income. So I got a part time position and resigned.
    As I was working my two weeks the boss who was ruthless who had been transferred to "clean house" was laid off. He was in his early fifties with two kids in college and two in high school and wife who never worked. It was a cruel reminder of how companies can operate.

  10. #10
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by freshstart View Post
    my company promised retirees who had 20 yrs in that they could buy health insurance at the group rate, higher than the employee rate but still a huge benefit. So at 20 yrs, I asked, "you are the only person who asked about that. We are stopping that plan." How could I be the only employee who was upset about losing that benefit? Sometimes I think I worked with the least financially savvy people on the planet.
    I know! The HR manager told me that hardly any retirees took advantage of the group health rate. So maybe everyone was pulling Medicare, but I dont think so, and this was before the days of Obamacare.

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