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Thread: What are you reading 2017?

  1. #161
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lainey View Post
    "The Story of Us" by Joyce Maynard. She's in her early 60s and had a late in life second marriage. Her husband was diagnosed with cancer about one year into the marriage. I've enjoyed her writing for years (both novels and earlier memoirs) and this is just as thoughtfully written and moving as her other works.
    have we talked about Maynard here once before? Her first novel was Baby Love, a sharply observed little story about a teenage mother. I liked that book a lot. (I am now at the age where I can remember when I read 37 years ago, but I don’t remember what I read three months ago.) anyway I kind of lost track of her for a couple decades until she surfaced as JD Salinger‘s teenage lover and that whole saga. So I have followed her a bit off And on since then.
    Last edited by iris lilies; 12-27-17 at 9:25pm.

  2. #162
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    Travels with Myself and Another by Martha Gellhorn and Homo Deus which I both like so far are amongst my latest library findings.

    I also picked up but have not started yet Valiant Ambition: George Washington, Benedict Arnold, and the Fate of the American Revolution by Nathaniel Philbrick, Black Detroit now that DB and SIL moved to Michigan and I hope to be visiting them and seeing the sights, and Ginny Moon, a novel recommended for me by Amazon, though I have not gotten into fiction lately.

  3. #163
    Senior Member KayLR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jp1 View Post
    As for what I've recently finished reading, probably the most interesting was Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Crest Trail by Cheryl Strayed. I've long thought I would like to hike the Appalachian Trail from one end to the other. And then I learned that there's a similar trail here on the west coast from the Mexico boarder in California to the Canada border in Washington. It appears to be a much more intense, and less done, trail. Tucked away in my bucket list is hiking it once I retire but before i get too old and decrepit to manage such a challenge.
    jp1, check out this blog by a local guy who hiked the Triple Crown in one year in 2016. I went to listen to him lecture and our newspaper followed his whole trip.
    http://freeoutside.com/
    http://freeoutside.com/calendar-triple-crown/

    His photos are stupendous. He is a fascinating, but understated and humble person---the hike changed him profoundly. Either it did, or it's just really taking a long time for him to adjust to the real world.

    I can't wait for his book to come out. I followed him on Instagram too.
    Last edited by KayLR; 12-1-17 at 6:58pm. Reason: added link
    My therapist told me the way to achieve true inner peace is to finish what I start. So far today, I have finished two bags of M&Ms and a chocolate cake. I feel better already!

  4. #164
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    "Shaking the Family Tree" by Buzzy Jackson. A non-fiction book by a self-described "accidental genealogist."

    She decides to explore her family tree and along the way educates us in all of the processes of genealogy. A great read for those wanting to get started, or for those who love history, or for those who just want a behind-the-scenes look at things like the LDS church free Family History Library in Utah.
    Best of all she does it with humor (fun chapter on the weeklong genealogy Caribbean cruise). Very enjoyable and educational at the same time.

  5. #165
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lainey View Post
    "Shaking the Family Tree" by Buzzy Jackson. A non-fiction book by a self-described "accidental genealogist."

    She decides to explore her family tree and along the way educates us in all of the processes of genealogy. A great read for those wanting to get started, or for those who love history, or for those who just want a behind-the-scenes look at things like the LDS church free Family History Library in Utah.
    Best of all she does it with humor (fun chapter on the weeklong genealogy Caribbean cruise). Very enjoyable and educational at the same time.
    I just finished The Stranger In My Genes, by Bill Griffeth--also an exploration of family and genealogy. Now I'm reading In Full Color, Rachel Dolezal's memoir--with more than a little skepticism.

  6. #166
    Senior Member The Storyteller's Avatar
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    And I just finished It's All Relative, by AJ Jacobs, of The Year of Living Biblically, er, fame. Also about genealogy.

    Inspires me to get back into it. The farthest ancestor going back I have found lived in Elizabethan England. And I just took the 23andMe ancestry DNA test. Looking forward to the results.

    Jim
    "There are too many books in the world to read in a single lifetime; you have to draw the line somewhere." --Diane Setterfield, The Thirteenth Tale

  7. #167
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    Since I found out I'm going to be a first time granny, I am reading a book called The Danish Way of Parenting that I want to pass on to DD. I am very concerned about the way kids are being raised (or not) these days but that's another thread.

  8. #168
    Senior Member Ultralight's Avatar
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    Two things:
    1. This thread is going to be outdated soon!
    2. I am reading a collection of three short stories by Hermann Hesse. They are: A Child's Heart, Klein and Wagner, and Klingsor's Last Summer.

    A Child's Heart was a good story, but nothing monumental.
    Klein and Wagner was dark and thought-provoking.
    I am midway through Klingsor's Last Summer. So far it is good with glimpses of greatness. Though it is a bit hard to follow.
    I came from a real tough neighborhood. I put my hand in some cement and felt another hand." -- Rodney Dangerfield

  9. #169
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    I'm reading "Sleeping Beauties" by Stephen and Owen King and enjoying it, simple entertainment. I'm also reading "How to Make Your Money Last" by Jane Bryant Quinn, which is interesting and pretty readable. The two balance each other pretty nicely.

  10. #170
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    I'm slogging through "Leonardo DaVinci" Biographies are not my favorite venue, but I'm learning a lot about the Renaissance, so the historical part is interesting and good things to know.

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