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Thread: And ACA dismantlement starts

  1. #1
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    And ACA dismantlement starts

    Here's a summary from: http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/p...bill/98826894/ and http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/cong...andate-n729871 - seems like they all miss important points in their articles. I don't see squat about what happens to the exchanges. And it sounds like requirements for employer provided insurance goes away.

    And if you have any need to ever be on Medicaid I'd suggest making it happen before 2020 or you may be waiting in line a long time.


    Here are the details of Republicans' proposed health care system.

    REPLACING OBAMACARE:

    Tax credits: The bill provides tax credits for people to purchase insurance based on age. Twenty-year-olds can receive a tax credit worth $2,000, and the credit grows the older a consumer gets. A 60-year-old can receive a $4,000 tax credit.

    The tax credits start to be reduced for a person making more than $75,000 and a couple making more than $150,000 to ensure that high-income patients' insurance isn't being federally subsidized.

    Health savings accounts: The bill expands the incentive to use so-called health savings accounts by doubling the allowed-contribution to more than $6,000 per person and $13,000 for a family.

    Medicaid: In 2020, Medicaid expansion would be frozen and new people would be barred from enrolling under the income-based system. The new way to provide coverage would allow states to implement eligibility based on population, essentially putting a cap on the number of people who can enroll in the Medicaid.

    WHAT STAYS:

    The measure isn't a full repeal of Obamacare. It would keep some of the most popular components of the Affordable Care Act, including an assurance that people with pre-existing conditions can keep their insurance. It also allows people under the age of 26 to stay on their parents' insurance.


    added:

    And the bill would not repeal the popular provision barring insurance companies from denying coverage to people with pre-existing health problems. Instead, to keep people from buying coverage only when they need it, insurers could raise premiums 30% for those jumping back into the market.

    added:

    Here's a much gloomier assessment: http://www.latimes.com/business/hilt...306-story.html

    If anyone can balance any of this out with some positive things, it would be good to hear.

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    Sorry, there are no positive things coming out of this congress with which to balance this news.

    Tax credits don't do any good for folks who owe little if any tax; you know, low income people. UNLESS the credits are made refundable (which the republicans see as "just another entitlement program". These (low income people) are the same folks who would have a hard time scraping together any money to put into a health savings account. This is a great system for the wealthy since it also comes with big tax cuts for them. This is the height of hipocracy from our congress critters who enjoy "really terrific" health insurance at OUR expense. Let's take away their health insurance and see how they like it.

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    I see the small positive as Trump says he will not dismantle Medicare or Social Security, so if you survive the healthcare system until you are 65 you can rest a little easier.

  4. #4
    Senior Member flowerseverywhere's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yppej View Post
    I see the small positive as Trump says he will not dismantle Medicare or Social Security, so if you survive the healthcare system until you are 65 you can rest a little easier.
    Yet.

    The wealthiest and and insurance company CEO's will make out very well. And the ability to by a cheaper stripped down plan is all well and good untill you have to use it. At any time you can fall and tear a rotator cuff or break a leg, or be the unlucky one who with no family history or risk factors get cancer, or have a heart attack. We will go back to people losing everything over medical bills.

    I also read read the bill and the accompanying articles and I saw little that made me happy. many more people will be without good insurance, many will have no insurance and the rich will get richer. As usual, the working middle class loses.

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    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    If I'm looking for positive things, it's an improvement from whatever was in place before the ACA and more generous than I'd expected from the conservatives.

    The incentives probably sound good on paper but are probably not going to be a huge relief for some people. I expect the number of uninsured will go up a lot. It seems to me like what both versions lack is an effort to bring health care costs down. I don't have brilliant answers for that but it seems like other countries have lower costs with better outcomes.

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    Senior Member flowerseverywhere's Avatar
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    Http://thehill.com/homenews/house/32...-or-healthcare

    Jason Chaffetz has the solution. Don't buy a new iPhone and spend the money on healthcare. Clueless.

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    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yppej View Post
    I see the small positive as Trump says he will not dismantle Medicare or Social Security, so if you survive the healthcare system until you are 65 you can rest a little easier.
    Whew! That's me.

    I don't understand this plan. So these credits replace the Exchanges?

    The incentives probably sound good on paper but are probably not going to be a huge relief for some people. I expect the number of uninsured will go up a lot.
    I agree. So you pay for your own healthcare, or at least your own deductibles/copays and premiums as well if you're not attached to an employer. Then you get a tax credit from the government. Don't like it.

    The thing that many, not all, Republicans don't realize is that there are lot of people in urgent need who just can't wait around for their tax credit once a year. Or they can't even put food on the table, never mind stash money in their HSA. They need medical services at a moment in time, and it's usually not April 15. I'm sure I'm not getting this.

    I really can't wrap my mind around this plan--must investigate when I get a minute.
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    Simpleton Alan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flowerseverywhere View Post
    Http://thehill.com/homenews/house/32...-or-healthcare

    Jason Chaffetz has the solution. Don't buy a new iPhone and spend the money on healthcare. Clueless.
    I wonder where he got an idea like that? Maybe here: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/obama-to...s-your-iphone/

    "Mr. Obama told the youth leaders gathered that he's not sure what the monthly cost of an iPhone is -- "I am not allowed for security reasons to have an iPhone," he said -- but that he expects that the cost of health coverage on the new Obamacare marketplaces is comparable."
    "Things should be made as simple as possible, but not one bit simpler." ~ Albert Einstein

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    And it sounds like requirements for employer provided insurance goes away.
    this doesn't matter, they were not enforcing it anyway and never looked like they had any intent to. It's more honest not to have a law if you aren't going to enforce it anyway (I mean AT ALL, they weren't just lax in enforcement, they made a decision not to enforce it).
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

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    It won't help the poor, the Medicaid expansion will hurt them, so yea it's mostly the poor who lose out with this. But even for the middle class 75k is a fairly low cut off to start reducing tax benefits if the whole of your plan is so called tax benefits.
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

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