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Thread: And ACA dismantlement starts

  1. #51
    Simpleton Alan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jp1 View Post
    Maybe you should be looking at Pfizer instead. They found a not so secret vault. And just imagine if they cut their marketing budget. But at least they don't need to worry about their biggest customer ever trying to negotiate prices, since congress doesn't believe in capitalism. At least not when taxpayer money is involved.

    http://www.reuters.com/article/us-pf...0T51ZS20151116
    So, Pfizer's operations cross international borders and they engage in "aggressive tax planning". That seems prudent.

    My company operates in much the same way, including being incorporated in Ireland as a plc. The difference between corporate tax rates has enabled us to grow our US manufacturing operations. By the end of this year we will have doubled our workforce within a two year period, providing a stable, middle to upper middle class income to hundreds of local residents. I'm not sure why that makes us bad guys.
    "Things should be made as simple as possible, but not one bit simpler." ~ Albert Einstein

  2. #52
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    There are a few interesting things I ran across while trying to study up on the new bill. One surprise is that 70 million Americans are on Medicaid. Basically one in five people qualify as being in a poverty level that makes them eligible for medical services. A lot of them are children and elderly. So they really don't buy insurance in the traditional way and insurance rate increase would not affect them. If the new bill rolls back the ACA medicaid expansion some of these people would lose medicaid eligibility. My big surprise was how many people are in this program and qualify as being at some sort of poverty level.

    Another item of interest was the proposal to change the "age tax". It basically would allow insurance companies to charge the elderly not yet on Medicare more. AARP says maybe $3000 more per year for a person over 60. So that would basically wipe out the $4000 a year tax incentive for people over 60 that is in the new bill. Nice work congress.

    As an off-shoot I looked up compensation for the CEO of Gilead. $18 Million a year in wages and benefits. I can only guess that if there were price controls on drugs, like other countries have, they might have to slim down some of their compensation packages. http://www.fiercepharma.com/pharma/g...st-year-as-ceo

  3. #53
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    I see the new law would abolish the tanning tax. Clearly the work of the Dark Lord.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogar View Post
    There are a few interesting things I ran across while trying to study up on the new bill. One surprise is that 70 million Americans are on Medicaid. . . .

    Another item of interest was the proposal to change the "age tax". It basically would allow insurance companies to charge the elderly not yet on Medicare more. AARP says maybe $3000 more per year for a person over 60. So that would basically wipe out the $4000 a year tax incentive for people over 60 that is in the new bill. Nice work congress.

    As an off-shoot I looked up compensation for the CEO of Gilead. $18 Million a year in wages and benefits. I can only guess that if there were price controls on drugs, like other countries have, they might have to slim down some of their compensation packages. http://www.fiercepharma.com/pharma/g...st-year-as-ceo
    Agreed. As a 62 year old who is retiring in 2 months, it looks like I picked the worse time to enter Obamacare thanks to the idiot Trumpsters. I'll be praying for good health until Medicare kicks in, or maybe I can pay any surprise medical bills with my paper tax credit...

  5. #55
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    If one of the owners of my company retired, (62) his social security, would give him $50 more then his insurance cost per month, this year.

  6. #56
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    See, ToomuchStuff, that is EXACTLY the problem. At 61, this is really hitting close to home. But I would not have had money to pay for ACA, either. And I already can't afford my medications.

  7. #57
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    I have a good friend that had to take an early disability retirement from the state due to her severe MS. She received a pension of 900/month and 500 went to her health insurance cost. She rented a room in a home and had some savings to tide her over until she was eligible for SS. Yes I got her a flip phone through lifeline so here is an example of some undeserving person sucking up our "freebies." Honestly I think some of the people on here have never had something really bad happen over which they have no control that negatively impacted their finances.

  8. #58
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    If one of the owners of my company retired, (62) his social security, would give him $50 more then his insurance cost per month, this year.
    the cost of healthcare is a problem, but SS is set up for you really really being penalized for collecting at 62 regardless. I find it inevitable I may have to anyway some day, not many people hiring 60 somethings afterall.
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lainey View Post
    Agreed. As a 62 year old who is retiring in 2 months, it looks like I picked the worse time to enter Obamacare thanks to the idiot Trumpsters. I'll be praying for good health until Medicare kicks in, or maybe I can pay any surprise medical bills with my paper tax credit...
    That's a good question - is the tax credit for medical expenses including insurance? Or just for health insurance premiums?

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by ApatheticNoMore View Post
    the cost of healthcare is a problem, but SS is set up for you really really being penalized for collecting at 62 regardless. I find it inevitable I may have to anyway some day, not many people hiring 60 somethings afterall.
    My mother found it made sense to claim benefits at 62. She was ill and unable to work and said due to COLA's her benefit would rise but if she had 3 to 7 more years with no contributions, on top of the years she missed paying in when she was a stay at home mom, her projected future benefits at 65 or 70 would have gone down not up. So claiming at 62 may not be a bad idea depending on your circumstances.

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