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Thread: Protesting is so good for the soul.....

  1. #201
    Senior Member IshbelRobertson's Avatar
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    Well, I've lived in various parts of England...!

    I'm Scots. I don't want to be anything else.

  2. #202
    Senior Member flowerseverywhere's Avatar
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    All this talk about I would move to x country makes me wonder how many countries want any more people knocking at their door. If you have something to offer, such as large sums of money to bring with you, a highly specialized and in demand skill (physician, nurse, engineer, computer expertise for example) are two reasons you might be allowed in on a more than temporary basis. People who will give socially and economically to the country of their desires and make the country stronger. Speaking their language fluently, knowing their history and culture, and abiding by their customs would be huge pluses along with whatever else you can bring. . Dealing with their quota of refugees is more than most can handle right now.
    Remember the girl who wanted desperately to move to New Zealand. She and her son (he had a name like hawk) and husband moved there. She had a yoga business and he worked too. After several years their visa was not renewed. It seemed from her reports i that they were hard working contributors who were not looking for benefits, did not want to have a bunch of kids off the government dime, but they were told goodbye.

    It it is like everything in life. You get out of it what you put into it. I myself love America, but I don't like everything about it. I have travelled all over the world and although Western Europe and Australia are lovely, I have no desire to move there. This is my home. I can crab about what I don't like, or ignore it, or try to improve it. I choose the third option. To the best of my ability.

  3. #203
    Senior Member Ultralight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bae View Post
    I just spent a fair bit of time in the Nordic nations. Nations that routinely score in the top rankings of "happiest places to live". Nations that have comprehensive arrays of "free" services they offer their citizens and immigrants. Nations that are pretty good about accepting immigrants.

    It might be interesting for Rob to look at what these societies expect out of immigrants in return. And dig a bit into the history of how they got here, and where their system is heading.

    I'll give him a wee hint though - if he shows up, hat-in-hand, with his attitude of "I'm shopping for a country that best serves me", without skills that are in demand or capital to invest in a business, it will be interesting, unless he's claiming refugee status... And even as a refugee, there are expectations.
    You get a lot of good stuff in those places, but you do have to take some real initiative and put in the effort. Learning the language would probably be high on the list of to-dos.
    I came from a real tough neighborhood. I put my hand in some cement and felt another hand." -- Rodney Dangerfield

  4. #204
    Senior Member Tradd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IshbelRobertson View Post
    I have to say If I disliked my country of birth, then I would live elsewhere, wher the values of said country suited me better! Feeling unhappy on a constant basis cannot be good for one's sense of well-being.

    The only country I would consider at present would be Australia.
    But would they take you?

  5. #205
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    put in effort yea, but of course those who do the worst in the American system (the poor) are those least ABLE to put in the effort most of the time. They simply lack the resources in every sense of the word (yes money but not just money, but things like time - a very important resource, things like hope after being ground down by poverty, even things like knowledge and exposure to different possibilities etc., sometimes even health). So it becomes those who can easily escape (and if we're honest this is probably the top 20% of income earners that have the easiest path out) have no real pressing NEED to as they will probably be ok regardless (but might still get some additional benefits from leaving - more generous retirement system etc.).

    It may not just be an American problem though, I've heard that even most of Syrians who made it to Europe were often middle class and up. The poorer Syrians even if they escaped Syria may not have escaped the middle east (a lot of middle east countries took in a ton of Syrians).
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  6. #206
    Senior Member IshbelRobertson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tradd View Post
    But would they take you?
    Yes.

  7. #207
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    We thought about trying to go to Canada because of friends in Newfoundland, but I don't think they would want us at this point because we don't have stellar health and we're over 50. Admittedly, it was a romantic idea having to do with land prices and the glories of universal health care. Unfortunately, I think it's like a loan, if you need one, you don't qualify.

    The few times I have been to Canada it has seemed like the people are extraordinarily nice, and culturally like a good fit, plus the beauty of the country, the clean air--anyway, that is where I would go, but it's too far of a drive to the grandchildren, too. I did have one ancestor who died in a Canadian prison camp back in the Revolutionary War, and I found one great-great grandmother who was French Canadian and then adopted by a family in New York after her parents died. That's about it for me and Canada.

  8. #208
    Senior Member IshbelRobertson's Avatar
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    We have lots of family there and are financially attractive to Aus. I wouldn't want to move there permanently as I am a typical red-haired, peely-wally skinned Celt. The sun and I prefer to be only nodding acquaintances!

  9. #209
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    I'm told that Australia took several of my ancestors some time ago, and they didn't even want to go.

  10. #210
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    LDAL Pretty good! Made me laugh.

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