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Thread: What, no Tide or Cheer or etc granular?

  1. #21
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    I have never understood dryer sheets either. Some cultural advertising meme that is now considered an essential by many. You shake clothes out and the static goes away. The dryer sheets leave a slimy feel to things and the smell can be nauseating. It is so odd to take walks in the evening and smell all the dryer sheets wafting through the air.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by catherine View Post
    See my edited post for my solution to that problem, although I have to say, I've never really felt static cling was a problem. I fluff & hang because the clothes last longer, have great body, have no wrinkles, and I save $ on heated drying.
    If you work around electronics, as I do at times, static means killing them and costing me money.

  3. #23
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    I use Mrs. Meyer's lemon verbena for laundry and shampoo. I did just buy some oxyclean for whites...I despise the scent of nearly every laundry detergent. Nothing smells as good to me as the old Tide granular, but now they all smell like chemicals. I used the washing soda, borax and liquid dish detergent recipe, but found it left a film that made the wash cloths and towels not absorb. I use vinegar as a rinse and don't have much static cling. There's a cloth diaper site that suggests oxyclean, hot water, washing soda and borax only...no detergent so I tried it with the washcloths and towels. Haven't seen a big difference yet.

  4. #24
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToomuchStuff View Post
    If you work around electronics, as I do at times, static means killing them and costing me money.
    It's easy enough to ground yourself or use a ground strap. I killed a card once by dropping it from the top of a ladder but never with static electricity.

  5. #25
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    seldom have static on clothes, although I suppose if clothes secretly carry static with no way to know about it, I wouldn't know of course. Apparently there are all types of natural ways that allegedly remove static like dryer balls that I would try before dryer sheets or fabric softeners if I had that problem (never used either but dryer balls seem cool). People also say rub clothes through a metal hanger etc..

    I might worry about this more if there actually was static, I wonder why there isn't, climate? I guess I usually wear cotton and supposedly natural materials have less static (true I think), but I'm not religious about checking materials of most things so it's really all kind of materials. And maybe I don't usually wear my clothes right out of the dryer or something and so any static goes away quickly (I don't even put them away right out of the dryer, I put them in a natural fiber woven basket and procrastinate - 3 cheers for lazy I guess). Maybe my clothes often have a little dampness when removed from the dryer? They often do. Hey 50 year old apartment dryers (or so they seem), not the best performing you know, but they suffice, dampness goes away quickly.
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  6. #26
    Senior Member CathyA's Avatar
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    Hmmm....I had totally forgotten about clothes and static. I can remember it being a problem when I was younger....especially if wearing a slip and a skirt........which I haven't done in forever. Maybe most of the materials are different nowadays?

    Funny.....I remember a fear I developed in the first grade. We had chalkboards, but a metal-type chalk holder at the bottom. Every time I would go to the chalkboard, I would get the worst zap ever. I got to really fear going to the chalkboard. haha
    (And I had new shoes that had a lot of rubber on the soles). Go figure........

    It's disconcerting to think about all the products that are invented/created and then we're taught that we just have to have them or bad things will happen.

  7. #27
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    The only time I ever recall any issues with "static cling" were back in the days of wearing panty hose.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by catherine View Post
    See my edited post for my solution to that problem, although I have to say, I've never really felt static cling was a problem. I fluff & hang because the clothes last longer, have great body, have no wrinkles, and I save $ on heated drying.
    It must make a difference where you live or the type of heat you have. Here the static is horrible.

  9. #29
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    I get static with synthetics. But I don't wear them straight out of the dryer.

  10. #30
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yppej View Post
    I get static with synthetics. But I don't wear them straight out of the dryer.
    That's what I was thinking... I remember static with nylon and polyester, but I don't get that much of it now at all.
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