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Thread: Flag protocol

  1. #11
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yppej View Post
    I modify the pledge, omitting the phrase "under God" and inserting "the goal of" before "liberty and justice for all".
    Likewise, I skip the "under God" part. But I'm with bae. I don't like loyalty oaths. I don't recall the last time I saluted the flag.
    Patriotism is generally a pose people assume, IMO. It's what people do--actions, not words--that count.

  2. #12
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    Our local Indivisible group is reciting the pledge of allegiance before every meeting now. I did not do this in high school--part of Vietnam era protest--and don't feel comfortable doing it now. It will keep me from attending their meetings to see what is going on there, and these were Bernie people in my town.

    I think it is odd that this is back, in this form.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tybee View Post
    Our local Indivisible group is reciting the pledge of allegiance before every meeting now. ....

    I think it is odd that this is back, in this form.
    Perhaps it is a defensive response to those who try to insist that anti-government protest means protestors are anti-American.

    I remember years ago reading an internet poster who said that if he pasted, say, an anti-war sticker on his car bumper, he made sure to paste an American flag sticker right next to it. Seems to remind people that protest is as American as our flag.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaneV2.0 View Post
    Likewise, I skip the "under God" part. But I'm with bae. I don't like loyalty oaths. I don't recall the last time I saluted the flag.
    Patriotism is generally a pose people assume, IMO. It's what people do--actions, not words--that count.
    Loyalty oaths and generally all kowtowing are done by two kinds of people - the ones who really believe, and the ones who lie about it. And often many seem more concerned with getting people to join the lie than actually believing. I'll be respectfully silent, but I'm not joining in.

  5. #15
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    Thanks for the discussion, it gives me something to think about. I live in the upper Midwest where pretty much everyone feels everyone has to be just like them to be an American! I tend to be more live and let live, that we aren't in the middle of WWII anymore, which seems to be where they are frozen.

  6. #16
    Senior Member awakenedsoul's Avatar
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    I always enjoyed reciting the pledge of allegiance in school as a young girl. We also used to sing songs following it: The National Anthem, California Here I Come, and America the Beautiful. It gave our morning a positive start and structure. We also did exercises. The whole routine made me feel happy and ready to start learning.

    I still put my hand over my heart and honor these traditions. I appreciate the athletes who publicly do the same. I have lived and worked all over the world, and am really thankful that I was born here. (especially now.)
    Last edited by awakenedsoul; 7-6-17 at 12:15am. Reason: typo

  7. #17
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    I am not comfortable with "public displays of patriotism". Around here it seems many of the public displays are done by people who seem to be less accepting of different people and ideas. I remember when Bush invaded Iraq and all of a sudden at noon the radio had "patriotic" songs, really war promotion songs. It made me edgy and uncomfortable. I KNOW there are people with love in their hearts for our country, but I think most of them aren't ostentatious about it, just quiet patriots doing the right things to better the world. In truth, I don't like public displays of affection or religion or politics. I remember when they put "under God" in the pledge, I must have been in second grade as I had learned it in first grade, then needed to add those words. Our mornings started with the pledge and a bible reading (public school). I did love learning all the patriotic songs . I don't know if they still learn those in schools.

  8. #18
    Senior Member jp1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by awakenedsoul View Post
    We also used to sing songs following it: California Here I Come,
    I wonder how many states have songs like that. We didn't sing ours every day, but when I was a kid everyone had to learn the Colorado song in elementary school. To this day that song still makes me happy.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9kuCnrSkeao

  9. #19
    Senior Member awakenedsoul's Avatar
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    Me, too. Children love singing and dancing. I still sing those songs in my kitchen every morning. It's a reminder to me of how I felt, naturally, as a child. It's also a way of setting my intention. I want to stay positive in my feelings about this country and its future.

    We also used to do these funny dances at lunchtime. It was very healthy. The teacher, Mr. Hoover, brought out a stereo to the playground. I think it was every Friday. We absolutely loved it. It was simple choreography, and easy to learn: The Hokey Pokey, that kind of thing...

  10. #20
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tybee View Post
    Our local Indivisible group is reciting the pledge of allegiance before every meeting now. I did not do this in high school--part of Vietnam era protest--and don't feel comfortable doing it now. It will keep me from attending their meetings to see what is going on there, and these were Bernie people in my town.

    I think it is odd that this is back, in this form.
    I think that's an nterestng choice of activity, but a good one. It serves to unify intent of the group, to remind them that they all are there to advance progress of the U.S.

    Maybe a rousing chorus of God Bless America (oh wait, God is there, nope) or My Country Tis of Thee
    would serve the same purpose. It is just that God Bless America is the easiest of the three anthems to,sing. i didnt mention Star Spangled
    banner because it is ridiculous to sing.

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