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Thread: Second hand market

  1. #21
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by catherine View Post
    This is an amazing coincidence, but after reading this thread I went online and googled "how to get rid of china" and there was a poster who said etsy has china on it. So I went to etsy and just searched for "china" and the FIRST thing that came up was MY Lenox pattern! At least I know I can get $40 for a few cups and saucers! https://www.etsy.com/listing/5168764...0723:516876437



    I think the pattern's pretty enough, but it's really more of a pattern that looks better in a hutch than on the table (and I don't have a hutch). My DH, the amateur chef, hates it because you can't present food nicely on it. The pattern detracts from the food presentation.



    Tybee, I think their aesthetic is simply less formal and ornate. But it's true that they don't have the "hope chest" mentality that we did. I remember it being a real pre-wedding ritual picking out your china pattern. I think another cultural reason for that is, some come from having lived with each other so they either blended all their stuff already and don't feel they need it; they don't see any real need because they have "good enough" stuff and have earmarked money for other things like travel.
    Before you get too excited sister, find out if they are actually selling. That is a listed price.

  2. #22
    Senior Member Williamsmith's Avatar
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    Certain Pyrex pieces including primary colors nesting bowls, butter print Cinderella casseroles and glass percolators are bringing decent money. There are some niche categories like vintage Japanese made radios, 70's stereos with turntables and 35mm film cameras.....are also improving. China and large furniture is weak due to the weight and transport factors. In my area anyway.

  3. #23
    Senior Member KayLR's Avatar
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    Yes, I have noticed this. Glad I have never owned a set of china. I do have a few pieces of it that was MY grandmother's--and I use it! Use your stuff now, and wear it out. Don't worry if you break it. Cuz, what the heck, seems no one else cares.

    My mom just passed away in May and her big overstuffed furniture (like new) is still sitting in her empty house. We couldn't sell it and none of us wants it.

    As for the big brown furniture, I notice a trend among the millenials is to buy this stuff cheap, sand it down, paint it white then distress it. You might market it to them that way.
    My therapist told me the way to achieve true inner peace is to finish what I start. So far today, I have finished two bags of M&Ms and a chocolate cake. I feel better already!

  4. #24
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    Those are really beautiful green and white dishes Tybee. Beautiful. However, my actual dishes are Correlle , so I am not the market I'm afraid!

    I haven't always cared what things look like either (though I don't mind my dishes). I call it simple living. I also don't travel much. I call it simple living
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  5. #25
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Haha, IL. Yes, I realize that. I was pretty much joking
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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  6. #26
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    The thrift stores here won't even take china cabinets because no one wants them. A friend of mine ended up giving away old china to a thrift store because it was so cheap on ebay not worth the effort. I ended up selling my curio cabinet that looked like new for 50 and I paid 200 20 years ago. I gave all the antique glassware and hummels to a husky rescue that has a thrift store. In my son's home they have 2 candles, a vase and a bowl as decorations and that is it. About 6 years ago we had a huge garage sale before downsizing and we had 40 boxes of books. 2 book dealers came and bought many of them. What did not sell went to a thrift store. I have had good luck selling furniture and appliances on Craig's list but it must be cheap. I also used offer up last time and I sold stuff that I was unable to sell on CL.

  7. #27
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tybee View Post
    Good point, Catherine, about a different aesthetic, and travel as having very high importance. You're right about already having a household established, too.
    I think I am going to concentrate on amassing jewelry to leave my dil and granddaughter. No one ever complained about inheriting jewelry, and it's fun to wear it in the mean time. Very small and portable. I was thinking about Old Indian Pawn bracelets as my next interest.
    Along with antiques, we had a lot of old pawn pieces, too. Some of it reposes in my safe deposit box.

  8. #28
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geila View Post
    We have an auction house nearby that holds sales every two weeks. They often have really beautiful things in excellent condition that doesn't sell. E.g. a beautiful wood table with 6 lovely chairs didn't get any takers even at $30. And LOTS of beautiful china with hundreds of pieces that nobody wants. Such a shame. I've gotten some wonderful wooden furniture there, well made and in excellent condition.

    But I've also bought stuff at Ikea because it serves a very specific function and space and is light and easy to move.

    Currently, I'm in the market for a round pedestal table for my very small dining nook. I'd like to buy something at the auction house before they go out of business (!) but the sets are just too big. I'm thinking of going with the Ikea Docksta instead: http://www.ikea.com/us/en/catalog/products/40063632/ and I can buy some beautiful chairs at auction for it. I haven't seen any pedestals at the auction house, though I don't go very often.

    We had a large Ethan Allen dresser and just took it to Goodwill and let them sell it. It was big, heavy, ornate and dark. I didn't like it. I think it was from the 80's. I do like the pieces from the 50's (I think?), they are the ones with very clean lines and simple design in lightweight wood. The color is usually brown but I just strip it and paint it a pretty light color.
    Please consider buying a old round pedestal table, an antique. Save it feom the landfill! And then buy chairs separately, perhaps modern ones.

    I am not sure what "too big" means but you can find 100 year old tables that are 40"ish in diameter that are beautiful.

    I love my civil war era table so much, I get veeklempt when I think about it. It is, at its basic layput, about 42" in diameter, and then it has many leaves that expand it out to seat 10 people. It has a beautiful skirt that prevents very tall people from sitting comfortably because it was made for small mid-Vctorian people, but DH and I are short, so that is ok.

  9. #29
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    when we were young and our kitchen was small all the round oak dr tables were too big. Then we found a bar table that was perfect. It was round, oak etc but just smaller in size.

  10. #30
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    I mix my 1927 oak table with my 3 dollar plastic school chairs, which I spraypainted gloss white, which now look kind of like this:


    So you can certainly mix these elements very handily, but I too would go for the oak 20's pedestal table, which are lovely.

    Okay, I just looked up the docsta materials, which are as follows:
    Table top: Fiberboard, Acrylic paint
    Leg: Reinforced polyamide
    Mounting plate/ Inside leg: Steel, Pigmented epoxy/polyester powder coating

    So I think recycling a 20's table--you can paint it white--might be the environmental winner? Only problem is it is heavy!!!!!

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