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Thread: Most Regrettable College Major in America

  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by gimmethesimplelife View Post
    The difference between the two? I don't trust any US employer not to discriminate against me based on whatever legally prescribed medication(s) I am taking at a given time - that ship has long since sailed - I am completely incapable of trusting a US employer to this level.
    There are plenty of legal medications that can impair your ability to pilot aircraft, perform surgery, operate heavy equipment, etc. I don't think it's a bad idea to make drug testing a condition of employment in cases like that. You'd be quick enough to sue a firm after a drug-related accident, wouldn't you?

    I don't think drug tests constitute unreasonable searches when circumstances like that exist. Some jobs require you to maintain a certain level of physical fitness. I don't have any issues with testing for that. I see it as the same thing.

    Absent a performance-related reason, which I realize can be somewhat subjective (should teachers be tested? Should students?), I'm not in favor of random testing for its own sake. I think a lot depends on your contract with your employer. My job, for instance, requires a credit check on the theory that someone who can't manage his own money shouldn't be relied on to manage other peoples'.

  2. #52
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    Since we've gotten sidetracked about drug tests on the job...
    I heard a piece on NPR about a truck driving company which is having a lot of problems finding drivers who can pass a drug test. Even when they know it's part of the interview process, 7 or 8 out of 10 applicants fail according to the owner. That seems awfully high and I wonder how many applicants are just failing to report some prescriptions they are taking.

    A relative who worked in a warehouse was also subject to drug tests in case of an accident. He happened to hit his head on a metal rack and needed several stitches, and the medical folks were then required to also draw blood for a test. He passed, but the point is that I think insurance companies are driving these drug tests more than anything.

    Wish we could mandate drug tests for the cocaine loving Wall Street banksters...

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by gimmethesimplelife View Post
    This isn't easy for me to post as I have read over your argument here, Bae, and I don't entirely disagree with your points. What makes me not change my mind? How scary American society has become today and truly how many people are perched on the precipice of rash behavior based on the fact that so many people have nothing in their lives worth living for. I especially agree with your last sentence about random drug testing "being forced to testify against yourself" - I just wonder as a society if we have gone so far down (and I believe that we have) that we can't afford the luxury of thinking the way you have posted above? And I don't disagree with you, all I'm saying is that given the realities of current day American society, I'm not sure we can afford the luxury of thinking your way any more.

    And yes, I do understand the implications of what I have posted and I also understand that this line of thinking goes against the grain of most of my thinking. I just know America too well to feel comfortable in a workplace without random drug testing - even as a temp serving banquets at the Convention Center I am tested and I am OK with it. Rob
    I'm not sure I'm following your argument here. Is it that America has become such a terrible place that large numbers of people are driven to drugs? So much so that we can no longer afford the "luxury" of Fifth Amendment protections against self-incrimination?

  4. #54
    Senior Member Williamsmith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by catherine View Post
    Totally a guess, but is it because theory is totally irrelevant in this field? You have to learn on the job out there in real-life situations?

    I'm thinking of the movie Crash (great movie) where the young, idealistic new cop is partnered with the more jaded, maybe even less ethical, cop, Matt Dillon. That movie is so great at showing how problem solving in situations is never black and white, and your instincts are more important than the rules of the game.
    Catherine you did a good job guessing. Add to it that any police department has academic and field training in the form of municipal police training, state police academies or federal academies.....much of which will conflict with college curriculum and professors who are far removed from real jobs. Universities and colleges simply jumped on the opportunity to oversell the criminal justice jobs that resulted from The war on drugs Era and all the jobs created by the incarceration of drug users and sellers.....mostly affecting the African American community and the Latinos. There is nothing particularly cerebral about criminal justice jobs......

  5. #55
    Senior Member Geila's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Williamsmith View Post
    Catherine you did a good job guessing. Add to it that any police department has academic and field training in the form of municipal police training, state police academies or federal academies.....much of which will conflict with college curriculum and professors who are far removed from real jobs. Universities and colleges simply jumped on the opportunity to oversell the criminal justice jobs that resulted from The war on drugs Era and all the jobs created by the incarceration of drug users and sellers.....mostly affecting the African American community and the Latinos. There is nothing particularly cerebral about criminal justice jobs......
    I think shows like CSI had a lot to do with it too. When I was in college recently, I met lots of young people who wanted jobs just like those on tv. I fear they're going to be quite disappointed.

  6. #56
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lainey View Post
    Since we've gotten sidetracked about drug tests on the job...
    I heard a piece on NPR about a truck driving company which is having a lot of problems finding drivers who can pass a drug test. Even when they know it's part of the interview process, 7 or 8 out of 10 applicants fail according to the owner. That seems awfully high and I wonder how many applicants are just failing to report some prescriptions they are taking.

    A relative who worked in a warehouse was also subject to drug tests in case of an accident. He happened to hit his head on a metal rack and needed several stitches, and the medical folks were then required to also draw blood for a test. He passed, but the point is that I think insurance companies are driving these drug tests more than anything.

    Wish we could mandate drug tests for the cocaine loving Wall Street banksters...
    when DH worked for a tree comoany it was common to for new hires to take the drug test and never return because they knew they didnt pass. I doubt htat it was 7 of 10, vut that also was 15+ years ago.

    I don't think nk it is u reasonable for people who operate,heavy ewuipment including warehouse ewuipment to be free of drugs, ut certsinly there are atrendant issues.

  7. #57
    Senior Member bae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post
    I don't think nk it is u reasonable for people who operate,heavy ewuipment including warehouse ewuipment to be free of drugs, ut certsinly there are atrendant issues.
    And I can see how temp workers serving banquets at the Convention Center *clearly* need to be free of drugs. I mean, we've all heard about the epidemic of tragic chafing dish mishaps. And the guy carving the roast beast might be too stoned to cut off a proper rare piece, someone might get stuck with medium rare.

    Heck, this is too important to trust to the employer, the government should step in and do the mandatory testing for all professions that interact with the public or produce goods/services for the public. It's for the children!

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    It's just interesting that "random" drug testing is heavily focused on the blue collar workers. It seems others in the so called professional class are not subject to these types of tests except someone like a pilot post-accident.

    I don't imagine that surgeons, for example, would agree to mandatory blood-testing in the event of a botched operation, or even random drug testing to make sure they're not doing any recreational drugs while they're performing your open heart surgery.

    Perhaps we need to drug test CEOs who may be about to sign multi-million dollar contracts and need a clear head - don't want to find out they were on a bender when they were supposed to be making these decisions.

    Why some and not others? Where does it end?

  9. #59
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    It's just interesting that "random" drug testing is heavily focused on the blue collar workers. It seems others in the so called professional class are not subject to these types of tests except someone like a pilot post-accident.
    yes, it IS better to work for a corporation. Of course I tend to work for small to mid size companies (fortune 500 they are not) that don't care if I read for pleasure on my own time either (if it really is my own time, that is I'm not on call and handling problems etc.).

    But anyway some blue collar jobs can open oneself up to a world of hurt and abuse. Working for a corporation is hardly as bad as it gets (yea working for government is probably cushier, but everyone can't get that).
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

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