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Thread: Big Purchase Jitters

  1. #21
    Moderator Float On's Avatar
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    Sounds like you got a good deal on your new fridge.
    I had to buy my 3rd fridge and went with a cheap small black one (one of those rental specials SteveinMN mentioned). It sounds like a bag of chipmunks and I'm sure I'll only get 5-7 years out of it but I have a tiny galley kitchen in the cabin and shop every 2-3 days so it holds what it needs to. I've never had ice/water in a fridge but I've never had cable either.
    Float On: My "Happy Place" is on my little kayak in the coves of Table Rock Lake.

  2. #22
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    I can live without the ice maker (and I am now), but I love the filtered water in the door. I use it several times a day.
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  3. #23
    Senior Member Geila's Avatar
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    I don't plan to hook up the ice maker. We don't use that much ice and I'm perfectly happy using the ice trays. I'd rather have the freezer space for freezing meals. And I do like the bottom freezer. It's what we have now and it brings the produce up which is really nice and you get lots more freezer space. The unit we have now is a 20+ year old Whirlpool and it's been making very loud noises lately and the temp doesn't seem to hold as well as so we figure it's time to retire it.

    Since we don't have upper cabinets now, I'm going to see what will work best - doing shelving around it or buying the cabinet box from Ikea.

    We've had our Ikea kitchen for 10 years and I love it. It is very good quality. Strong as heck! And I love that you can design your own kitchen. I used all drawers for my cabs, including a 24" and a 36" wide. They hold large amounts of pots and pans and you just open the drawer, and voila! Their island is very sturdy as well and I got their farmhouse kitchen sink and it still looks like new. We don't have a dishwasher and this sink is fantastic (it was about $280 when we bought it and now it's $313, still a bargain):


  4. #24
    Moderator Float On's Avatar
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    That is a stock photo to show the sink right? Cause it looks like a dishwasher to the right. I love those farmhouse sinks. I wish wish wish I had the one out of the old farm house. It had the built in drain to one side. Dad sold it when he tore down the house and then the guy never paid him (a co-worker). I love the open shelves above and the idea of drawers for cabinets. I hate bending over/swinging open the door/banging my knee.
    Float On: My "Happy Place" is on my little kayak in the coves of Table Rock Lake.

  5. #25
    Moderator Float On's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by catherine View Post
    I can live without the ice maker (and I am now), but I love the filtered water in the door. I use it several times a day.
    This made me laugh. My parents got their first fridge with water/ice in the door last year. Last time I was home and went to get some ice and the first cube went across the floor. Dad told me that the only reason he got ice/water in the door was because every time he'd get ice out of a tray one cube would land on the floor (happens to me every time too), he thought the ice/water in the door would fix that problem. Nope. Still has to bend over and find one ice cube every single time.
    Float On: My "Happy Place" is on my little kayak in the coves of Table Rock Lake.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Geila's Avatar
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    Yes, stock photo to show the sink. I only have one picture that shows my kitchen well and my nieces are in it and I'm too lazy to dig out the camera and take another one. But I was stoked when I saw this come up when I googled the sink. This looks almost identical to my sink area with a few exceptions: no dishwasher in mine, no dangling light bulb either, my counter is the almond speckled color, and I have a lazy susan on the right and a pull out cabinet on the right for the trash and recycling. Everything else is the same. I was planning to paint the white walls a soft sage mint green in the fall, but when I saw this photo I thought it looked so nice and clean. So I might leave my 2 white walls alone and just paint the 2 bright yellow ones.

    Maybe one of these days I will take a some kitchen photos and share.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yppej View Post
    A handyman doing a minor repair told me a few years ago that Ikea cabinets are pressed wood not hardwood. Giving all the cans I stack up when things are on sale I want something sturdy that will last. As Toomuchstuff notes, a lot of of products now are not high quality.
    I understand the concept behind what he is saying, but on the other front, the cabinets are made with materials that are recycled, have hardware that was engineered to work with them and the limitations of their design, and they figure the average lifespan before remodel, etc. in their warranty.
    Newer solid wood cabinets are not the same as old growth, solid wood cabinets either, where the wood was grown slow, with tighter rings over a long period of time, then the fast growth forrests used to supply new "solid" wood cabinetry.
    Even then a lot of "solid" wood cabinets, are not. The boxes are plywood or particle board with a veneer, rather then solid wood that they would have been in the mid 1800's.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveinMN View Post
    Refrigerators now are smaller inside than they used to be for a given cabinet size.

    I've found that to be very much the opposite, but that is based on a 1940's model fridge and a 1960 hotpoint, 14 cubic foot model that was the same size as my parents 18 cubic foot, probably 20 year old base model.

  9. #29
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToomuchStuff View Post
    Originally Posted by SteveinMN
    Refrigerators now are smaller inside than they used to be for a given cabinet size.
    I've found that to be very much the opposite, but that is based on a 1940's model fridge and a 1960 hotpoint, 14 cubic foot model that was the same size as my parents 18 cubic foot, probably 20 year old base model.
    Hmm. I obviously bought the wrong refrigerator. All y'all love your bottom-freezer models and I hate mine (Whirlpool) with a white-hot heat. The freezer is the same capacity as the old KitchenAid top-freezer we gave up. Things didn't fall through the mesh of basket in the KA because it didn't need a basket. The angle at the back of the freezer basket to accommodate the compressor steals a lot of packing room. The little sliders to control crisper humidity look like the end of popsicle sticks jutting out of the shelf and I'll put mortgage money on them not lasting the life of the fridge because the crisper catches -- and bends -- them most times the drawer is closed.

    The old fridge was 22 cubic feet and fit in its alcove with several inches on the sides and a bunch more on top. The new one is 22 cubic feet, as well, but fits the alcove with just a few inches on either side and a small fraction of an inch on top. Reminds me of the oldish Frigidaire side-by-side that was in the house when I bought it -- it was jammed into the alcove, too, in every dimension, but the sticker inside said it was a 26 cubic-foot model. The old KA even took just half the electricity the new one does.

    Nope. Not happy with this purchase at all. But I don't think anything would have been better at the price and I was not going to pay $2000 for a refrigerator that will last maybe 10 years. Arrgghh.
    If Americans expended even a fraction of the energy on civic engagement that we spend on consumer ideology, our democracy would be much healthier. Can you imagine people camping out to vote? -- Charles Roberts, Amherst, Mass., Nov. 25, 2006

  10. #30
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    In 2011, we bought an LG bottom freezer unit, $2,200, and love it. It uses almost no electricity (rated for something like $11 a year), nothing has broken, the bottom has two deep compartments with a large rolling drawer over them and a wire door rack for small things. We did NOT get a unit that has any water running to it so no auto ice, etc. And my favorite part is the alarm that sounds when any of the doors are left open.

    I also have an LG washer and love it too. Got it even earlier than the fridge. I would buy and LG again.

    I am amazed at the refrigerators I have seen at the high end place that are over $5,000 and well up to $10,000 each.

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