Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 234
Results 31 to 36 of 36

Thread: RV living

  1. #31
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    344
    One of the perks of rving is there are no boarding fees or pet sitters.

    Also, I know my sheets are clean, and who has done what on/in them.

    Same with bathroom in the rig.

    I can carry all my food.
    The list goes on...

  2. #32
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    3,321
    It is a lot of work to camp with the dogs. Especially if we go to a state or federal campground because there is dirt everywhere. The Maltese hair holds onto the dirt so they are dirty, your bed is dirty and you are too when you pick them up. The big guy sheds so the dirt falls off of him. If we take a vacation versus camping with friends we stay in commercial rv parks where this is not an issue.

  3. #33
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Saint Paul, Minnesota
    Posts
    4,195
    Quote Originally Posted by nswef View Post
    I am enjoying this thread. I quit Girl Scouts in 7th grade because of overnight camping and out houses. I keep thinking nearly 60 years later that maybe I would enjoy it. I keep reading experiences...then I think about having a bath, air conditioning, getting up at night, bugs, campfire smoke, people next door in the campground and just can't get my head around enjoying it. But I like to think I MIGHT!
    What's the old line? "Now I think 'roughing it' is sleeping on the floor of the Holiday Inn."
    If Americans expended even a fraction of the energy on civic engagement that we spend on consumer ideology, our democracy would be much healthier. Can you imagine people camping out to vote? -- Charles Roberts, Amherst, Mass., Nov. 25, 2006

  4. #34
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    10,970
    Quote Originally Posted by Teacher Terry View Post
    It is a lot of work to camp with the dogs. Especially if we go to a state or federal campground because there is dirt everywhere. The Maltese hair holds onto the dirt so they are dirty, your bed is dirty and you are too when you pick them up. The big guy sheds so the dirt falls off of him. If we take a vacation versus camping with friends we stay in commercial rv parks where this is not an issue.
    Vacationing with a dog, even just one, is complex.

    I miss our little French bulldog who was a good traveler. We took her with us to flower shows a few times because she was good in the car, good in a hotel room (never barked) and good with bathroom habits. Plus, she was small and we could carry her through the lobby or elsewhere.

    Now we have a big bulldog who will bark in strange places, most likely. i wouldn't trust him to be quiet if he were alone in a hotel room.

    For camping in a small trailer we would have to go when the temperature is 45 - 70 degrees F because of the dog, and that is doable, but it means fall in the midwest or winter down south.

    I fantasize about a small trailer, and DH is on board with that, but I think we would use it for two years then be done! I still think that, for us and sans dog, Air b nb rentals are the way to go.

    edited to add: I have told this before, but it is still interesting, to me anyway. Some years ago we had a foster bulldog who had been passed around to several homes in his short life. This guy was savvy about the world. We dumped our barking, brainless Frenchies into a kennel and took HIM on vacation (along with our single well behaved French bulldog.) Later he was adopted by a guy who moved to Ireland, and I always thought he was a good dog for that much travel and new surroundings because he knew how to handle himself.
    Last edited by iris lilies; 8-8-17 at 12:06pm.

  5. #35
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    3,321
    WE have taken our dogs on many trips including car, RV and flying. If we fly we only take 2. They all learned to be good travelers. One was a 10 yo puppy mill breeder and it took time but she learned how to travel too. They are all pad trained except the big guy of course so that makes things much easier. It is much easier to only travel with 1 or 2 dogs.

  6. #36
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    1,495
    We have one dog that lives to travel--she is much happier on the road, I swear. Her sister is pretty good, and has learned good motel manners from her. But she is a scaredy cat and freaks out if on the road too long--too much too much, too many new things. She gets cranky after about five days. The terrier, on the other hand, runs when we get out the kennel for the car and acts like she hates the house.
    They both travel in kennels in the car and love their kennels, feel very safe there.
    I fear this new pup many push us into trailer world, just for things like going outside.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •