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Thread: Changes in the Rest of Your Life from Using the Kondo Method

  1. #11
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    Keep on trucking! It's so worth it.

    Last summer, I took a week off of work and did a great amount of Kondo-ing in that week (clothes, books, papers, bathroom adjacent closets), and then my home sat half cluttered and half organized for months. It was better than it had been, for sure. A few months later, I got a chance to do several more days of Kondo-ing (CDs/DVDs, kitchen, some other stuff don't remember what, along with some kids' stuff), and that made things even better.

    My life is easier overall because of the work I did in decluttering. I used to lose so much time just finding things that had somehow gotten lost or buried under other stuff. It's so much easier to get ready to take the kids to the beach, for example, because I know exactly where the beach towels and goggles and sunscreen and water bottles and beach/tote bags are. All those things are kept in different places, and each of those places has been decluttered. Hence, pulling them all and putting them all in one bag takes me minutes instead of an hour. And I don't get distracted halfway through!

    My husband and I get along better. I used to get mad at him if he moved things b/c then I wouldn't be able to find what I was looking for. But when things have a place, both of us gravitate towards putting that thing back into its place. Kitchen scissors, for example. When I decluttered the kitchen, though, I left the one kitchen shears in the one utensil drawer, in a specific place. Lo and behold, DH and I both put it back in that place b/c it makes sense and is easy to find.

    I have more quality time with my kids. And I'm teaching them to keep their things more orderly.

    Don't get me wrong. My house still has a LOT of stuff. You'd know I'm no minimalist. But it feels more open and bigger. I feel more comfortable in my own house. I got to keep as much of everything as I loved--no false limits on how many clothes I can have.

    And I haven't even finished, technically. I haven't sorted memorabilia or several other small categories. I let my kids keep way too many toys. DH's tools could stock a small hardware store. But even so, my life is definitely better.

    Keep on trucking.

  2. #12
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    Teacher Terry, you've been helping quite a lot!

    Nswef and TVRodriguez, thanks for your kind words and encouragement, and TV Rodriguez, it helps a lot to hear from someone who achieved a lot (but not everything) in increments and saw some positive changes.

  3. #13
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    I've gotten past the easier stuff and am now tackling things that are painful reminders of loss - lost job, lost relationship, lost youthful looks - items as varied as old paystubs and Victoria's Secret lingerie.

  4. #14
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    Hi there I haven't had a chance to read the whole post so I may be repeating something already posted.

    I thought it would be too much at first but, there is some point in the book she says it could take up to a year.

    So I thought that made a lot more sense for me....I have followed her advice to do one type of thing at a time.
    To the point of doing all bedding, all DVD, all table linen you get the idea and at first I thought it would not make a difference
    but, my house is so much more organized that I am much more diligent about putting things away...And, lo and behold it stays neat that way

  5. #15
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    I think it is a long process. A few cross country moves with a family of 5 got me to downsize but then stuff built up again. Then about 12 years ago I realized I had too much stuff and would go in spurts getting rid of stuff. I did this off and on for 7 years and then the last 5 years I have been ruthless mainly because I found I feel better and also if something should happen to me I don't want to burden my kids with tons of crap. Then I realized that I appreciated the stuff I did keep more and also that it was faster to clean. When I read the Kondo book I honestly thought I had nothing left to get rid of but using some of her method I realized that was not true. Also our local humane society holds 2 rummage sales a year so I like to have stuff to give them too. I did not put all my clothes in a pile on the floor. With a big time shedding dog I would have had to rewash everything even though I am constantly sweeping. For some reason this summer is the worst it has ever been. Probably because we had a real winter for once and now it is really hot. His coat probably got thicker this year. Ugh! I love books but for me the books have been going slowly over time. I have about 20 left. Recently I pulled 20 from my collection and my friends took all but one. I emptied totally the closet in my office which is small and got rid of everything but now it is full again. But the reason is because I was able to put a file cabinet in there and other stuff that I had just sitting around. Also my friend's Mom was getting rid of a few things I knew I would use like a folding single bed that has super thick cushions and just lays on the floor. That takes a far amount of space but I knew my kids could use it when they have company but they have no space to store it. Also my friend and i have a few things that I store that is hers and we share it. I wish I wold have done this when I was younger. Sometimes I think about the $ I wasted buying things that I had to dust and then eventually giving them away. Now before I buy something I ask myself if I am going to be hauling it to Goodwill in a few years. Also I no longer exchange gifts with people. Instead we celebrate by going out to eat or doing something else fun. That really helps to keep the things coming in down.

  6. #16
    Senior Member pony mom's Avatar
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    I did a lot of Kondo-ing over the past few years. My bathroom counter has nothing on it, my horizontal surfaces have less stuff, my underwear is still neatly folded and stored the way she says, I love all of my clothes, my health/beauty stuff is down to the minimum, I could go on and on. Cleaning is much easier.

    Two years ago a riding accident left me with a frozen shoulder, which made me give up my job as a massage therapist. I was burned out and tired of it anyway, got rid of a lot of my books, sheets, stuff I wouldn't use again (still have my table though). Found a job that I actually enjoy now.

    I think MK is onto something when she tells you to gather and organize "like things together". I thought my bathroom stuff was really minimal, until I saw it covering the counter and floor of the bathroom. How in the world did I get all this stuff? I have a pixie haircut-----will I ever need a flat iron, butterfly clips and hair elastics again? Used up all the shower gels and soaps I wasn't crazy about and treat myself to handmade goat's milk soaps.

    I rarely buy anything anymore if it means I'll look forward to the day when I use it up. Buying in bulk the things I regularly use (dental hygiene stuff) just made my closet crowded. I've got summer and winter sheets, three hand towels for the bathroom, basic makeup, three shades of nail polish that I rarely wear. The books I kept fell into one of two categories.

    My parents and I went through hundreds of photographs. We kept very few. My sister and I have no children, there aren't many family members we are close to, and many of the people in the photos were strangers to us.

    There are still a lot of things to get rid of. Baby steps.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Williamsmith's Avatar
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    I did a major downsize from a four bed three bath ranch a little more than two years ago. After purging about 75% of my stuff, I squeezed into a two bed two bath condo.

    The experience of learning just how much I had accumulated and how hard it was to plow through and rid myself of all of it was mind blowing. I truly felt like a weight was removed from my shoulders. But I hadn't read Marie Kondo until I was already downsized. It was then that I did a second purge. And I learned that "tidying" was a spiritual process. It required me to actually hold a piece in my hands or mentally hold it and see just what joy it provided or didn't provide, and then removing things from my life became a desire.....not just a need.

    This is where it got sticky for me. I've been married for 34 years. My wife began to ask me what I was doing, she noticed how I was doing it and she started questioning the need, the methods and the affect it would have on her. Because a lot of the "stuff" leftover was jointly acquired "stuff". She really has a clothes fetish. Especially sweaters and shirts. Now she is collecting nice pottery.

    Anytime I purchase something new and bring it into the house...something goes out. But she has a different opinion and so I struggle with the need to be clutter free while she seems to get comfort from adding things.

    I think being a minmalist is list is much easier if you are single.

  8. #18
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    WS: yes it would be much easier if single. I have been getting rid of stuff for a long time but my DH is the opposite. So I limit his stuff to his office, shed, garage and his storage space in our bedroom. That way our main living area is calm and peaceful. When I got rid of my curio cabinet and everything in it he did not like it but it was mine to do what I wanted. Everyone who came in commented that my living room looked bigger. Marriage is compromise

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