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Thread: Opoid crisis. Why is this happening!?!

  1. #11
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    A couple of friends of mine have been prescribed Oxycodone (?) for post-surgery pain. Both of them took one or two. Whatever happened to extra-strength Ibuprofen or Acetaminophen?

  2. #12
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    There was a series of articles a few months ago about how downtrodden middle-aged white males were a big part of the rise in use. For what ever reasons people come up with, I still can't get my head around it. Once a person starts down the road, the likely outcome is not good at all.

  3. #13
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    I live in Ohio. Crisis central.

    I didn't take them.

    actually people not taking them is part of the problem. Then they sit around probably easy to find in bathrooms across the country. Our local sheriff has been sending out post cards every month reminding you where you can drop off unwanted medication.

  4. #14
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    Are heroin and crack deaths included as an opioid?

  5. #15
    Senior Member Williamsmith's Avatar
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    Part of problem solving is getting past the "why did this happen" stage and the "who's fault is this" stage quickly and move onto the "here's what we are going to do about it" stage as soon as possible. I agree the urban community was somewhat thrown under the bus but more for economic reasons and lack of political influence that to a degree had a racial component. But you would be mistaken to believe that the drug abuse issue was handled differently amongst Middle and upper income people. They just have the ability to cover it up better. Outcomes have Often been just as punitive....it has devestated opportunities for all. And it has been exasperated by incarceration, poor local economy and policies that seek to punish. Three strikes was a fiasco.....both in its impact on urban blacks and on tax payers. A good percentage of incarcerated drug violators were not violent. A huge amount of public tax money goes for failed policy like marijuana eradication. It is literally "weed pulling" paid for by your federal taxes and they use a great number of federal assets to do it. I'm not getting preachy here....I don't have the answers but to anyone I say,"What's your plan? And thus far, how's what we have been doing working out?"

  6. #16
    Senior Member Williamsmith's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nswef View Post
    Are heroin and crack deaths included as an opioid?
    Heroin is King Daddy of the opiods. I would rather be a gutter drunk than put a needle in my arm one time.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by nswef View Post
    Are heroin and crack deaths included as an opioid?
    Heroin is. So is fentanyl (what killed Michael Jackson.) From codeine to heroin--quite a drug.

    It is not a new problem, though. My grandmother was a WWI nurse and her first husband was a morphine addict. Very common at the time, I guess. He threw her out of a second story window and they thought she would never be able to have children. That was in Nebraska.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Simplemind's Avatar
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    I have lost two friends to addiction. Although still living (if you can call it that) I had to draw a boundary. Both started with a simple prescription for pain and took it as directed. Both continued to get legit refills for pain far too long. Then they started getting it other ways, then it took over their lives. Smart, good people with law enforcement careers that lost everything to the point of being homeless. They are not the only ones that I have known to struggle but they are two that had such a huge fall from grace that it took my breath away. I barely recognize them when I see them. It breaks my heart and I miss them every day. I keep waiting for the call from the department telling me that they have been found dead.

  9. #19
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    A lot of people on SSDI get regular, monthly prescriptions and sell them for the extra income.

  10. #20
    Senior Member gimmethesimplelife's Avatar
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    Here's my take on this issue, coming from a border state and living in a lower income area.....lol...no need to mention the zip at this point.

    First, these highly addictive pills are way wicked overprescribed....big time. I remember when I left Maricopa Medical Center this past December (checked in due to a liver infection) I was given a large bottle of oxycodone upon checkout - way more than I needed. I was in pretty severe pain for five days after leaving the hospital and on day six, I woke up virtually pain free and no longer needed the oxycodone and promptly stopped taking it as those pills really scare me - they make me so loopy and distance me so much from reality. I can see why they are so addictive but I have no wish to distance myself from reality. Anyway, my point is - why so many pills just handed out like candy? I would have done just as well with being given only 20 pills with one refill only after seeing a doctor and having someone judge if a refill were valid in my case.

    Another reason - like it or not, with income equality only increasing each and every year, we live in a nation of haves and have nots - of winners and losers. Men ,especially, are vulnerable to society's definition of "winner" and "loser". I was 14 when I rejected this BS for what it is, but not every last male out there has the ability and the fortitude to do so. If we are going to have "losers" we are going to have problems with drugs, which is why I get so bent out of shape when people get critical of Mexico for supplying the US with drugs. Hello - how about we work on the reasons there is such a high demands for escape from society first? At any rate, I blame turbo charged capitalism and globalism for a lot of our drug problems - for giving doctors incentives to overprescribe and for making many men and women feel like "losers" for not measuring up to some insane meaningless standard - hence the desire of such people to escape in some form.

    Of all the drugs available in the 85006, I'd say that opiods are the most problematic - even worse than meth. And what's more is that they are so blasted easy to obtain - every time I'm in Nogales or Algodones I am offered opiods by some shady vendor - even once when I was looking at Talavera plates. Of course I said something along the lines of no thank you, that is not why I am in your beautiful country - said with no snark or bite - but others say yes instead. I don't know an easy answer here BUT we have to stop passing out these pills like candy as they are a MAJOR problem in the 85006 and beyond my life, all over the border states and beyond that, I understand they are a huge problem in flyover country. And didn't Donald Trump just call New Hampshire some kind of opiod den? There was some recent quote from him in regards to New Hampshire and it's opiod issues. Rob

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