Page 8 of 8 FirstFirst ... 678
Results 71 to 78 of 78

Thread: Equifax leak?

  1. #71
    Senior Member bae's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Offshore
    Posts
    6,462
    I've noticed in my spam-email folder multiple different offers to "check if I was exposed by the Equifax leak, and help me protect my online identity".

    None of them of course are from anyone I've ever heard of. And most of them seem to originate from sketchy places.

    And they seem to want me to give them all sorts of personal identifying information, so they can "check" for me...

    Fun times....

  2. #72
    Senior Member jp1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    3,229
    And now this. Equifax has been sending consumers to a fake site to check if they'd been breached...

    http://www.businessinsider.com/repor...of-site-2017-9

  3. #73
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Saint Paul, Minnesota
    Posts
    4,052
    Quote Originally Posted by jp1 View Post
    And now this. Equifax has been sending consumers to a fake site to check if they'd been breached...
    I want nothing to do with these b------s. As far as I'm concerned the whole company ought to be out of business and money clawed back from the bozos on the executive team. And the other two (three?) credit-reporting agencies audited deeply (I don't for a minute think Equifax is the only donkey in this parade). Absolutely incompetent.
    If Americans expended even a fraction of the energy on civic engagement that we spend on consumer ideology, our democracy would be much healthier. Can you imagine people camping out to vote? -- Charles Roberts, Amherst, Mass., Nov. 25, 2006

  4. #74
    Senior Member Williamsmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Penns Woods
    Posts
    1,900
    Quote Originally Posted by SteveinMN View Post
    I want nothing to do with these b------s. As far as I'm concerned the whole company ought to be out of business and money clawed back from the bozos on the executive team. And the other two (three?) credit-reporting agencies audited deeply (I don't for a minute think Equifax is the only donkey in this parade). Absolutely incompetent.
    Exactly, the sentiment that represents the greatest risk of the Credit Rating Agency model. One of the reasons there are so few of them is because the very purpose for which they evolved was to maximize the extension of credit toward as many as possible under the most fair circumstances. This led to the consolidation of local entities that collected information for lenders to search on borrowers so that efficient dissemination of information used to make lending decisions would be centralized. All this made the availability of credit facilitate economic growth.


    But when the information collected is not secured from the hands of criminal entities.....well consumer and lender confidence goes out the window and lending becomes a boondoggle. When lending is strangled....the economy suffers. The risks are multifaceted. Not only can fraudulent accounts be created.....now the most advantageous group of victims can be targeted. People with good credit are also people that have the most to lose. Because people with good credit are actively borrowing and paying back as agreed. If those people react like SteveinMN....our whole model for expansion based on easy credit goes down the drain.

    We might have to rely on making purchases as we can afford them and not based on our past history of being able to pay off loans coupled with a forecast of future earnings potential. We might have to actually get out of debt. Oh my, what an abhorrent idea!

  5. #75
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Saint Paul, Minnesota
    Posts
    4,052
    Quote Originally Posted by Williamsmith View Post
    We might have to rely on making purchases as we can afford them and not based on our past history of being able to pay off loans coupled with a forecast of future earnings potential. We might have to actually get out of debt. Oh my, what an abhorrent idea!
    I don't have a philosophical issue with credit. There are things I will want/need to have in my life which I likely never be able to buy in one go. Sometimes using credit is merely a matter of convenience -- flash the card at the point of sale and settle up at the end of the billing period. Restricting credit to a nation in which consumption drives the economic train? I wouldn't mind seeing it. But it's just asking for economic trouble in lieu of some other model.

    Aside from the lackadaisical security measures for credit-reporting agencies, though, I do have a problem with credit ratings being used for things as far-ranging as car insurance, apartment rentals, and evaluating job candidates. I believe you get what you measure, and, in this case, they're measuring the wrong thing. You can be freakin' incompetent as a driver but if you've got a good credit rating you're a better insurance risk? Umm, no. Poor credit makes you a poor employee? Hmm, sounds like if you're bloody poor at what you do, you can get a job at Equifax...
    If Americans expended even a fraction of the energy on civic engagement that we spend on consumer ideology, our democracy would be much healthier. Can you imagine people camping out to vote? -- Charles Roberts, Amherst, Mass., Nov. 25, 2006

  6. #76
    Senior Member Williamsmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Penns Woods
    Posts
    1,900
    I did background investigations for cadet applicants for my department. Part of that...actually a good part of it was a thorough review of credit history complete with interviews of past lenders if there was any sign of delinquency at all. More than one candidate was excluded based on their lack of diligence in repayment.

  7. #77
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    2,958
    Quote Originally Posted by Williamsmith View Post
    I did background investigations for cadet applicants for my department. Part of that...actually a good part of it was a thorough review of credit history complete with interviews of past lenders if there was any sign of delinquency at all. More than one candidate was excluded based on their lack of diligence in repayment.

    That is also frequently done for security clearances.
    I do wonder how the change in system, would effect those of us with little to no credit/credit rating. We are punished now in the form of higher prices on Insurance and such, when at least in my case, (others/coworkers I know) we are more likely to self insure for the small/stupid stuff.

  8. #78
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Saint Paul, Minnesota
    Posts
    4,052
    My ex had to go through a credit check when she worked in the securities industry. I get that, in some lines of work, having a good credit history indicates some degree of ethical behavior on the applicant's part. But a credit check to be a computer programmer for non-financial apps? Or to be a health practitioner? Does running a credit check so uniformly answer the right questions? And who does it leave out because there may be no number to fill in the blank?
    If Americans expended even a fraction of the energy on civic engagement that we spend on consumer ideology, our democracy would be much healthier. Can you imagine people camping out to vote? -- Charles Roberts, Amherst, Mass., Nov. 25, 2006

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •