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Thread: Las Vegas

  1. #101
    Senior Member bae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LDAHL View Post
    I was thinking of serial numbers.
    What does the serial number accomplish for you? (I mean, yes, when you get a gun in your possession at a crime scene, you can backtrace it through to the original point-of-sale, but what does that accomplish exactly? How many Bad Guys have they caught from having a gun in-hand and tracing it? )

    A letter I have here from the BATF clarifying whether it was necessary to put a serial number or marking on my projects says:

    "Additionally, although markings are not required on firearms manufactured for personal use (excluding NFA firearms), owners are recommended to conspicuously place or engrave a serial number and/ or other marks of identification to aid in investigation or recovery by State or local law enforcement officials in the event of a theft or loss of the privately owned firearm."

    Firearms manufactured for sale are regulated a bit differently than ones made for personal use.

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by LDAHL View Post
    If it were that easy, wouldn't we be reading about the country being flooded with untraceable homemade firearms? Or are factory made pieces simply cheaper and easier to obtain?
    Unfinished, 80% lowers can be ordered and sent to your door. They range in price, in part by Caliber. A rifle caliber (standard 223 or 5.56 round) can be had without looking hard, for $75. If you have never done it before, and don't have anyone that could show you, the jig to finish it (not counting router, drill, bits, etc) is $65.
    Where complete lowers that are not finished (you provide the paint/coating), can be had for as low as $19. Finished/coated ones, for as low as $29. Then you have your transfer fee (hunt around, locally $20).
    Both of the above, still require a lower parts kit to complete ($29).

    For those that stay legal, it can be cheaper to buy the registered one. Felons, or those that want something fancy, or want to say they made it, it costs more.

  3. #103
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    We should really be talking also about banning pressure cookers.
    Or the best idea I have yet, since they are "wondering how he got all those guns in the hotel room", along with the sledge hammer, is to do something that would also potentially speed up your airport trips.
    Let us require that all suitcases be clear. Everything displayed, guns, jewelry small items, etc. towards the outside (then smallest clothes to largest), unless you have a concealed carry permit.
    The hotel would have seen this, airport security would appreciate this, so would the criminal element as they could watch the bags to see who to attack. Honest people shouldn't care about their unmentionables, or streaked clothing, being on display in public.

  4. #104
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    Realistically, I don't think most mass shooters have the ingenuity to assemble or make an assault weapon. The LV guy was an exception.

  5. #105
    Senior Member CathyA's Avatar
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    Sounds like many pro-gun people don't want changes, or feel that there's just no use to try anything. It's all or nothing.

  6. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by CathyA View Post
    Sounds like many pro-gun people don't want changes, or feel that there's just no use to try anything. It's all or nothing.
    Then you need to listen more carefully.

  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogar View Post
    Realistically, I don't think most mass shooters have the ingenuity to assemble or make an assault weapon. The LV guy was an exception.
    You should watch the video's of how to assemble one. With parts kits and being able to buy parts semi complete, one would have to be severely disabled to not be able to build one.
    Quote Originally Posted by CathyA View Post
    Sounds like many pro-gun people don't want changes, or feel that there's just no use to try anything. It's all or nothing.
    We would like real, logical, truly useful suggestions. Try fixing the problem, not the object:
    https://byrslf.co/thoughts-on-the-ve...g-14af397cee2c

    Fix people!

  8. #108
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToomuchStuff View Post
    You should watch the video's of how to assemble one. With parts kits and being able to buy parts semi complete, one would have to be severely disabled to not be able to build one.
    I received in the mail just this morning an ad from a parts/ammunition/sporting goods supplier, for 100% AR-15 receivers from a reputable manufacturer for $39. Of course, those are considered firearms, and so must be transferred on your BATF form 4473. As you point out, from there to a fully-assembled and functional firearm is < 1 hour's easy work following a youtube video, probably less if you've done it before.

    Also note - AR-15 receivers can be used to built lots of different sorts of firearms. (One of the many reasons the AR-15 platform is popular.) For instance, a single-shot bolt-action firearm can be made with one. Which would present regulatory issues if one adopted the "hey, let's ban things" approach.

  9. #109
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToomuchStuff View Post
    You should watch the video's of how to assemble one. With parts kits and being able to buy parts semi complete, one would have to be severely disabled to not be able to build one.
    You know, I am a hunter and have a few gun responsible firearm enthusiast friends. One of them has desired an AR-15 for some sort of home defense that I don't quite get, but that's fine. I'm going to forward some of this to him. I was aware of some of the 3D printing options, but I have never previously heard of this, nor has my friend. Are there common gun web sites or publications where this information gets attention, or is it a specialty niche? Nor was I aware of bump stocks and wonder again if you have to get into specialty gun groups to know of them. Although, now everyone in the world knows about them. Our local news said there has been a large wave of bump stock sales, now.

    Anyway, I would speculate that if there was a ban on assault weapons, a perspective shooter would be more likely to pick something up on the black market or use what is commonly available. But maybe everyone in the gun world knows all of this, and I'm wrong.

  10. #110
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    The AR platform as a home defense weapon, has pro's and con's just like any weapon. I have seen a few of them (it is the personal defense weapon of the US military, verses a pistol, because it can be used at short and long ranges) (it can be troublesome due to its size, but that is adaptable for rifle or pistol use)
    The 3d printing stuff, was in the news big time a few years back, when the first 3d printed pistol, was created. The only metal needed was a nail, for a firing pin. I am sure devises evolved, but I haven't looked or kept up with 3d printing. (interest verses usefulness, verses cost/payback) When 3d printers get cheap and can print inexpensively with metal or plastic (make your own tools, vehicles, etc), a lot of jobs will be going away. Old expired patents, and searching the patent databases, will find people making tools, and other things based on that data.
    The gun from the movie In the Line of Fire, is basically a 3d printed design.
    As to where one gets this information, it is the same source of the problems.... people.

    There are gun forums, both brand specific and type specific. Youtube, Ebay, your neighborhood gun store and shooting ranges. All you need is a want to learn and open mind/ear.
    If you want to do violence, people tend to listen to those bits of info they think they need. Some bad guys get stopped because of that and spouting off their ideas/plans, etc. and someone notices (hey something isn't right with this person), others keep to themselves and are quiet, and try to buy in little quantities to not get attention (friends relative whose family owns the hardware store Ted K shopped at).

    Information and tools are only dangerous if the user chooses to use them in that manner.
    Anyone else remember the radioactive boyscout?

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