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Thread: Disconnect about food and health

  1. #11
    Senior Member bae's Avatar
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    On the other side of the coin, they feed us 6000+ calories a day when we are actively working fires.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tradd View Post
    It's not just what we would consider processed junk food. i know someone who is a nutritionist and works at an inner-city hospital. She said that both African-Americans and Hispanics have foods traditional to their culture that are very high in fat.
    I have lost 11 pounds so far on a high fat, low carb diet.

  3. #13
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    We are eating out much less than we used to. Looking for more places that serve tapas style small plates or ala carte where we can choose and share. It is pretty amazing to me that we now compliment places that serve food in reasonable portions because they seem so unusual.

    I am traditionally built and as I get older just cannot eat as much as we did when we were 25.

  4. #14
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    My Fitness Pal http://blog.myfitnesspal.com/the-1-h...@sfmc:55715406 sends out occasional emails and this just came in. I found it interesting to read. We do this on this site so often, helping with advice and learning from each other as well as providing support. I find I am agreeing with this advice. What do you think? Is this part of the obesity problem? Is the overeating with friends and family part of the problem?

    "A while back, a few of my colleagues and I decided to write down every single weight-loss habit we have ever used ourselves or with our clients. In four days, we had listed 167 of them. That’s a lot. Recently I asked those 50 coaches to look at the list again and pick the one habit you should have to lose fat easily.

    And it wasn’t on the list.

    To be fair, a habit is sort of nebulously defined. I think we can all agree that a habit is anything you do regularly, but according to the definition we use in psychology, a habit also needs to be done automatically — as in, without really thinking about it. Which is why identifying habits by yourself is so hard. How can you think about the stuff that you don’t have to think about?

    Which is probably why we missed this habit. And it’s exactly why this habit is so important for fat loss.

    You see, all habits need a trigger — a little reminder that says, “Hey, you should do this action now.” They also need a reward — a little reminder that what you just did was a good thing. But these are really hard to identify by yourself because they happen below our level of consciousness. It’s really hard to remember new triggers, and it’s hard to remember to reward yourself. Habits are hard. But this is the one habit that makes all the other 167 habits on our list easy. As a result, we decided that The Number 1 Habit You Should Have to Lose Weight (™) is:

    FINDING PEOPLE TO SHARE YOUR JOURNEY

    Permanent lifestyle changes happen in relationships. Whether they take place with peers, a coach, family, friends, coworkers, the other anonymous people at the meetings or the other new recruits who joined the Marine Corps with you, new habits happen when people get together and help each other out.

    Finding your own triggers are hard. Seeing other people’s is easy. Remembering to tell yourself, “Great job!” is hard. Remembering to tell other people is easy. Figuring out how to work new foods, new activities, and new steps into your own life is hard. Watching and learning from a whole bunch of other people like you who are trying to get to the same place you are is just so much easier! Even my colleagues, habit experts all, needed each others’ help to figure this problem out."
    Gandhi: Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony .

  5. #15
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bae View Post
    On the other side of the coin, they feed us 6000+ calories a day when we are actively working fires.
    Our local farmer says he has to consume 6000 a day--a couple of years ago he didn't have a tractor and was tilling and managing 2 acres of land by hand... no wonder he needed so much fuel!

    Our culture and our habits are just doing us in. Too much processed food, too little getting up and moving, too many ingrained cravings for things that are bad for us. Change is hard.

    I remember doing interviews in Spain a while back and right before the interview we were watching from behind the two-way mirror the staff suddenly scurrying around changing out one of the regular chairs at the table to a bigger, sturdier one. When I asked the moderator was happening, she said that the incoming respondent was "large." What I expected was maybe a 350lb person. What I saw was someone who looked absolutely, typically American. Couldn't have been more than 200 lbs. Large, but not seat-worthy? Maybe in Spain... I had to laugh.
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
    www.silententry.wordpress.com

  6. #16
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    Many here have touched on reasons America is getting more obese. But everyone is different. bae's dietary needs at certain times greatly ecilpse those of other members of this group at everyday levels. Different ways of eating work for different people.

    Like Yppej, I've been losing weight steadily on a low-carb/high-fat diet. I don't track specific pounds lost (the doctor will tell me on Wednesday) but I already know that, in the last three months, I'm 2" down on my jeans and yet another belt notch in my new belt. Fat is not the enemy -- even at the elevated level at which I (and, presumably, Yppej) consume it. It certainly is possible to overdo the ingestion of fat. But medical studies are indicating more and more that fat is far less dangerous to humans than an excess of carbohydrates, which, even in healthy (e.g, non-PCOS, non-diabetic) people, causes huge reactions within the body to address the digestion and storage of all those carbs.

    One additional problem, I believe, is that there are so many nutritional studies that contradict each other that people just stop listening. Coffee is bad for you, then it's good for you. Eggs are vilified and then they're heroes. Saturated fat was no good for you; now having some keeps your body satisfied and going in the face of the constant blood-glucose spikes of unsatisfying high-carb/low-fat diets. The studies themselves are full of assumptions (as most studies need to be) but those assumptions or limitations are not publicized as widely as the conclusion. The funding of the study is rarely examined, either, which is how soda manufacturers can fund studies showing that pop really isn't all that bad for you.
    If Americans expended even a fraction of the energy on civic engagement that we spend on consumer ideology, our democracy would be much healthier. Can you imagine people camping out to vote? -- Charles Roberts, Amherst, Mass., Nov. 25, 2006

  7. #17
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    This is news?
    Soda ISLE, cereal ISLE.

  8. #18
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    Soda ISLE, cereal ISLE.
    Yep. And parents loading up their carts with the stuff. Drives me nuts to see young kids set off on that path. Long ago, I "taught" DH to read the sugar content of processed food and he still does.

  9. #19
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    Most people don't need so much added fats (as opposed to those that just occur naturally in foods) if they are just eating a typical diet, it really is just empty calories, but there are plenty of other ways to add empty calories as well without fat (that is say: refined carbs) that are actually much easier to do unless one is totally pouring on fat and so it's the diet as a whole not any one thing. And if one is doing a specific diet, low carb it can be fine as one is eliminating other calories and setting lots of limits around the diet. Most diets will work if stuck to, sticking to them though is another matter. Obviously the larger influence on eating patterns is cultural, although some people have individual reasons for their food choices (stress etc.).
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  10. #20
    Senior Member Williamsmith's Avatar
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    Just the fact that we have to actively seek out weight loss strategies says much more about American lifestyles than could ever be discussed in this thread. I could take a camera into my WalMart and crush your optimism about the ability of our healthcare system to address our problems. International food marketing, large agribusiness and the trucking industry .....three things we could do with less of. Our whole economy is based on the cheapness of foodstuff. But the back end health costs eat us alive. And still, I find myself wandering around the isles of the big box stores because I can’t justify paying more in the near term even though I know it’s best for me in the long term. Feel like I’m in an episode of Twilight Zone.

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