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Thread: hygge

  1. #1
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    hygge

    I have been reading about 'hygge' a danish word meaning comfort and more. There are certain elements like soft surroundings, warm drinks, soft lighting, nourishing healthy food, and friends and family. It sounds lovely, heck it is from my ancestors. It is a way of managing the long dark winter partially from what I read. That seems a nice way to manage the seasonally affective issues that many of us have.

    One thing I read on pinterest included ideas to make your workspace more hygge. I could really use that! I have a storage closet basically with one outlet. I have to sit on the floor to connect with the printer. I brought in my inflatable meditation cushion to sit comfortably on the floor and work part of the day. But generally the room is piled with supplies and paperwork that is half processed all over my desk. I could put up some nice pictures, bring in slippers and clear my desk so I have room for a nice tea cup.

  2. #2
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    I like what I've read about hygge too. In the winter I'm more likely to light a candle and have it on the table where I am reading, with a glass of wine or a cup of tea.

  3. #3
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    "Hougah"...

    I am sitting on an inflated ball as I write this.

    Maybe Americans can learn something from Danish society and culture... accentuating the cosy & convivial.

    Danes tend to be rich (without working long hours), sexy, fond of communal singing, and unpretentious in their sense of humor (Victor Borge being an exemplar).

    Danes take more antidepressants per capita than any other country. Danes also are well above average in the consumption of confectionary and bacon.

    They enjoy beer. Typically teenagers around age 15 are introduced to beer consumption by their parents.

    And coffee (the finishing touch in Babette's Feast.)

  4. #4
    Senior Member beckyliz's Avatar
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    I read a book about this earlier this year and am really attracted to it. I think it put into words what I've always liked in my home and gave me focus on how to develop it.
    "Do not accumulate for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust destroy and thieves break in and steal. But accumulate for yourselves treasure in heaven, where moth and rust do not destroy, and thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, your heart is also." Jesus

  5. #5
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    I saved the following to my quotations file; I've never forgotten it:

    “It’s considered a right by Danish people not to be talked to.” Danish researcher explaining to Morley Safer the finer points of his national psyche (in a report on the happiest people on earth)

  6. #6
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    It's an introverted culture, unlike the U.S. which is an extroverted culture. Yes that means it's likely easier to be an introvert there but likely harder to be an extrovert.
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  7. #7
    Senior Member pony mom's Avatar
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    There's a good YouTube channel by a French woman who designs clothes and talks about French culture. She sometimes lives in Germany and she explains the difference between the two cultures. French people are a food culture, with a lot of time spent outdoors, dining with friends. The Germans, like the Danes and Scandinavians, have cozy, well appointed homes for spending the long cold winters in comfort. So lots of candles, socks, blankets and warm drinks are necessary.

  8. #8
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    I always associated Germans with hiking the Bavarian Alps in their lederhosen. Go figure.

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