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Thread: How long do you expect to live?

  1. #1
    Senior Member bae's Avatar
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    How long do you expect to live?

    Related to the "how low can you go" thread, and the "she sold it all" thread:

    Two questions:

    Q1: In your financial planning, how long are you planning on living?

    Q2: Are you planning on spending down your assets to zero, or leaving a substantial amount of your capital to a future generation, or some cause of interest to you?


    A1: My grandparents and great-grandparents all lived into their mid-to-late 90s. I'm planning on a 99 year lifespan for myself just so I don't run out early. My wife's family tends to die in their late 80s/early 90s. Look for me on Tindr in about 3 decades :-)

    A2: I'm planning on leaving the vast portion of our capital for the use of future generations, so I'm not adopting a spend-to-zero approach at this time.

  2. #2
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    I expect to die before DH. My pension income dies with me (or continues another 8 years maximum for DH.)

    If I die first, DH will have modest Social Security income and our stash. The stash is pretty significant and he also has two fall backs

    1) he is very frugal
    2) he can do small Mr. Fixit jobs for income

    If that isnt the case and he dies before me, my income will be decent, around $53,000 annually. Plus the stash. Which I have no intention to preserve. Die Broke is my philosophy.
    Last edited by iris lilies; 11-5-17 at 5:04pm.

  3. #3
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    I plan to be in my paid up and modest home until 99 years at least and then re-evaluate the situation. I have enough in pension for living expenses for some time to come. Family will inherit whatever remains.
    Gandhi: Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony .

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    There is an interesting longevity calculator at
    https://www.livingto100.com/calculator

    According to that tool my life expectancy is 94.

    I could live beyond 94. There is also the matter of morbidity before death. It may be possible (and enlightened self-interest) to compress morbidity. The span of healthy and active years before the onset of debilitating disease is what matters to me most. I will settle for 94, followed by compressed morbidity, then death with dignity. I hope this does not open a can of worms (or fly larvae) in the discussion.

    I plan to annuitize assets when I attain the age of 73-75 with the purchase of Single Premium Immediate Annuities (and some deferred annuities with lesser amounts to provide for increases in the cost of living in my riper years.) The annuities will be joint, so the second-to-die will basically die broke.

  5. #5
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    My family lives well until about 90, at which point they have to go to a nursing home. Once I'm institutionalized Medicaid can pick up the slack if need be. I am not buying long term care insurance. My parents are near 80, generally healthy, active, and living at home. My baby brother stays with them and helps with heavy chores.

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    I got 87. I don't care if I leave any $ behind. WE helped our kids when they were young and needed it. My Mom spent all her $ and had a good time. WE were all glad for her. She died just short of 90. She did traveling when she could and was able to live off of her pension and SS comfortably. She pre-paid and bought everything for her funeral and when she was dying she told us to sell her car and use the $ to treat everyone that came to the funeral to a nice lunch which we did. If she had lived longer she would have been fine too since she no longer wanted to travel.

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    Both of my parents died at age 69 but I think/hope it was lifestyle more than genes - alcohol, smoking, etc. I don't have a clue then as to how long to "plan" to live but as mentioned whether it's next year or thirty years, if those years are unhealthy ones I would rather not linger just to attain a number. I am hopeful that there are assets for DD but if not, she married into a well-to-do family so I am not too worried about leaving a lot behind.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    I'm delaying taking social security until full SS retirement age or maybe a couple more years beyond. That will replace a significant pull from my nest egg. Very roughly going from 3%-4% withdrawal to maybe 2%. I'm hoping the remaining nest egg will then at least keep up with inflation, which sort of makes projecting longevity less important, at least money wise. Whatever is left after old age care or any disaster will go to charity. All my potential family recipients are comfortable on their own. I've grown accustomed to living below my means and probably will continue to do so until the end.

    I'm healthy and have a good lifestyle with parents that lived into their mid-80's. I'm thinking there is a reasonable possibility I'll make it into my late 80's.

  9. #9
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinkytoe View Post
    Both of my parents died at age 69 but I think/hope it was lifestyle more than genes - alcohol, smoking, etc.
    Yeah, same thing for me. If my parents hadn't hastened their demise with alcohol and smoking they might have lived for a very long time. Other members of my family have lived well into their 80s and 90s. I took the life expectancy calculator twice so I could get a range, depending upon a "best case scenario" based on good intentions vs a perhaps more realistic scenario, and I fell between 96 and 100.

    I don't think I'll have much to pass along, and it will get divided 4 ways. If I can give them something, I would like to. But based on my recent experiences with family homes, I might just liquidate all real estate when I get to be 85 or so and live in an apartment so assets could be split evenly and cleanly. I'm hoping I'll be able to do that. My great-aunt was extremely healthy and self-reliant in her own apartment until she died. I hope I'm like her.

    If not, I'll put proceeds from the house towards assisted living, and the kids can get whatever is left.
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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  10. #10
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    Needing to enter an email address for periodic updates from the website is enough to discourage me from getting the results of the survey

    Quote Originally Posted by dado potato View Post
    There is an interesting longevity calculator at
    https://www.livingto100.com/calculator

    According to that tool my life expectancy is 94.

    I could live beyond 94. There is also the matter of morbidity before death. It may be possible (and enlightened self-interest) to compress morbidity. The span of healthy and active years before the onset of debilitating disease is what matters to me most. I will settle for 94, followed by compressed morbidity, then death with dignity. I hope this does not open a can of worms (or fly larvae) in the discussion.

    I plan to annuitize assets when I attain the age of 73-75 with the purchase of Single Premium Immediate Annuities (and some deferred annuities with lesser amounts to provide for increases in the cost of living in my riper years.) The annuities will be joint, so the second-to-die will basically die broke.
    Gandhi: Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony .

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