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Thread: Doing nothing Vacation

  1. #31
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    Over the Holiday break from work I am excited about the staycation I am planning for us. We have complied a list and still growing before we zero in on the list, of ethnic restaurants and different meals then we have tried before. All with in an hour or two. Ethiopian looks fun and neither of us have tried this. I am vegetarian so reviewing menus is really helpful first! I am setting aside a dollar amount and this is far less than a holiday, plus hubby will be home each day for the beloved naps! Korean did not look good at all to me, maybe I am missing something?

  2. #32
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BikingLady View Post
    Ethiopian looks fun and neither of us have tried this. I am vegetarian so reviewing menus is really helpful first! I am setting aside a dollar amount and this is far less than a holiday, plus hubby will be home each day for the beloved naps! Korean did not look good at all to me, maybe I am missing something?
    I like pretty much all cuisines.

    Korean food is delicious. But my take is that the Korean preference for peppery heat and the sourness of fermented food is something many Westerners do not expect. There are dishes without the heat and "funk", of course, but one of those flavor notes is present in most dishes and both present in many. I liken Korean food to listening to musical soloists playing together rather than a well-practiced orchestra. It's excellent food; just ... different.

    I love Ethiopian food. Some of it can be spicy, but you can manage that when you order. It's fun to eat with your hands the way Ethiopians do and I can fit the injera bread into a low-carb eating plan. I hope you really enjoy it!
    If Americans expended even a fraction of the energy on civic engagement that we spend on consumer ideology, our democracy would be much healthier. Can you imagine people camping out to vote? -- Charles Roberts, Amherst, Mass., Nov. 25, 2006

  3. #33
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Ethiopian food is one of my favorites; I always get the vegetarian combination, even though I'm a meat-eater. Injera is carboriffic and will put me in a semi-coma, but once or twice a year I risk it.

  4. #34
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    So excited to try Ethiopian! Thanks for the tips. Love spicy foods too.

  5. #35
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    I enjoyed my Ethiopian restaurant experience but will NEVER go again. The mush was put in a trough in the middle of the table for everyone to dip there "bread" into. It was not very tasty or appealing. I enjoyed the experience though.

  6. #36
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by frugal-one View Post
    I enjoyed my Ethiopian restaurant experience but will NEVER go again. The mush was put in a trough in the middle of the table for everyone to dip there "bread" into. It was not very tasty or appealing. I enjoyed the experience though.
    I love Ethopian food and that sour bread is divine. I also like the communal experience. And the “mush.”
    Really, if I wasnt going out of town now I would go out tonight for
    ethiopian food, inspired by this thread.
    Last edited by iris lilies; 11-23-17 at 8:41am.

  7. #37
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaneV2.0 View Post
    Injera is carboriffic and will put me in a semi-coma, but once or twice a year I risk it.
    Because it is so prevalent here, I've discovered that there are (at least) two kinds of injera. One is made of teff and a leavener. The other variety has teff and wheat and barley and maybe some other grain. The teff-only injera has 10 grams of carbs per big round. I would imagine the teff-and variety has far more because of the other flours. Even I, who manages on 25-35 grams of carbs a day, can manage a good-sized half-round of injera. So what's in the injera they serve you? Or is it just going through 2-3 pieces in the course of eating the meail?
    If Americans expended even a fraction of the energy on civic engagement that we spend on consumer ideology, our democracy would be much healthier. Can you imagine people camping out to vote? -- Charles Roberts, Amherst, Mass., Nov. 25, 2006

  8. #38
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveinMN View Post
    Because it is so prevalent here, I've discovered that there are (at least) two kinds of injera. One is made of teff and a leavener. The other variety has teff and wheat and barley and maybe some other grain. The teff-only injera has 10 grams of carbs per big round. I would imagine the teff-and variety has far more because of the other flours. Even I, who manages on 25-35 grams of carbs a day, can manage a good-sized half-round of injera. So what's in the injera they serve you? Or is it just going through 2-3 pieces in the course of eating the meail?
    I'm pretty sure it's normally the mixed-grain variety, but you can get teff-only if you order ahead. I actually bought some, thinking I would try fermenting it and making injera. Some day, maybe.

  9. #39
    Senior Member HappyHiker's Avatar
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    I know what you're saying..sometimes vacations to tourist hotspots (especially if language/currency are different than yours) can be exhausting, rather than restful.

    One of our favorite vacations was to go visit Frank Lloyd Wright's Falling Water house in PA. and then to tour around to various small towns in the area and stay in quirky places (one was a rental in a place that used to be a morgue, then a tool company)...others were log cabins in State Parks and in a yurt, too.

    We did some cycling on the Great Alleghany Passage bike trail, got caught in a big thunderstorm and torrential downpour miles from anywhere and had such a fun time laughing our heads off 'cause it was just so ridiculous how wet we were...and yet we kept pedaling as we had to...never felt so alive or goofy.

    Anyhow, that was just a great vacation and involved no flying and no fancy hotels or gourmet...just small town America as its very best...
    Author of the green eco-thriller: Falling Through Time http://fallingthroughtime.com Editor of http://vibrantvillage.com

  10. #40
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    HH I have thought of visiting Fallingwater but thought an hour hour tour might be too long. How interesting was the tour guide?

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