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Thread: In Texas I'm a second class citizen

  1. #11
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    bae, It seems this Texas Court feels some people are more equal than others. It's horrible. I don't see it improving either.

  2. #12
    Senior Member bae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nswef View Post
    bae, It seems this Texas Court feels some people are more equal than others. It's horrible. I don't see it improving either.
    I see it improving over time, as younger generations step up to leadership roles.

  3. #13
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bae View Post
    I see it improving over time, as younger generations step up to leadership roles.
    That's about the only hope I have in these dismal times.

  4. #14
    Senior Member jp1's Avatar
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    The texas court's behavior in this situation is also an example of why elected judges arent necessarily a good idea. They oroginally made the correct decision, then bowing to political pressure, reversed themselves.

  5. #15
    Senior Member bae's Avatar
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    The original article and case got me wondering a bit:

    How do they define "same-sex" and "opposite-sex" marriages?

    ~1%-2% of the population is intersex. What would "opposite-sex" be for an intersex individual?

  6. #16
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bae View Post
    The original article and case got me wondering a bit:

    How do they define "same-sex" and "opposite-sex" marriages?

    ~1%-2% of the population is intersex. What would "opposite-sex" be for an intersex individual?
    And that might be a lowball figure, once they perfect DNA analysis.

  7. #17
    Senior Member jp1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bae View Post
    The original article and case got me wondering a bit:

    How do they define "same-sex" and "opposite-sex" marriages?

    ~1%-2% of the population is intersex. What would "opposite-sex" be for an intersex individual?
    Indeed. Perhaps it depends on whether they were forced to have surgery as a kid to remove the partial penis? [/snark]

    But seriously, it infuriates me to no end the psychological harm that comes from making such distinctions and from treating everyone's differences from the mainstream norm of cis/het as a defect that needs to be corrected, whether we're talking gay/lesbian/intersex/something else. A friend of mine founded the Intersex Society of North America (ISNA) a bunch of years ago. One of the things she did while she was running the organization was create a documentary that featured long group interviews of a group of intersex individuals. All of these people but one had some fairly obvious issues of self doubt, fear that they lacked self worth, confusion as to who they actually were and so forth. The one that didn't was different from the others in one key way. Her intersexness (is that a word...) was discovered by herself as a teenager, not by the adults/doctors in her life as a small child. As a result she had been able to take the time to grow comfortable with it and embrace it. And ultimately to share it with her eventual sex partners not as a defect, but as something that made her special and unique.

  8. #18
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jp1 View Post
    Indeed. Perhaps it depends on whether they were forced to have surgery as a kid to remove the partial penis? [/snark]

    But seriously, it infuriates me to no end the psychological harm that comes from making such distinctions and from treating everyone's differences from the mainstream norm of cis/het as a defect that needs to be corrected, whether we're talking gay/lesbian/intersex/something else. A friend of mine founded the Intersex Society of North America (ISNA) a bunch of years ago. One of the things she did while she was running the organization was create a documentary that featured long group interviews of a group of intersex individuals. All of these people but one had some fairly obvious issues of self doubt, fear that they lacked self worth, confusion as to who they actually were and so forth. The one that didn't was different from the others in one key way. Her intersexness (is that a word...) was discovered by herself as a teenager, not by the adults/doctors in her life as a small child. As a result she had been able to take the time to grow comfortable with it and embrace it. And ultimately to share it with her eventual sex partners not as a defect, but as something that made her special and unique.
    I may have seen that documentary; at any rate I did see one reporting on a nurse that tried to foster/adopt a baby before the medical establishment was able to perform an orchiectomy on him to "reassign" him. Unfortunately, doctors prevailed. We still have a long way to go.

  9. #19
    Senior Member bae's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaneV2.0 View Post
    We still have a long way to go.
    People still consider aborting children who have my particular karyotype - the last study I saw, from 2011, indicated that 32% of parents informed choose to abort. It was all the rage about the time I was born.

    And apparently, in Texas, my partner and I would technically have a second-class marriage.

    Yay.

  10. #20
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    Reminds me of a conversation I had years ago with the most right-wing guy in our office. He said that gays should not get "special privileges" legally.
    I asked if it was okay to fire someone from their job simply because they were gay. He said, No. So I asked what should they do if that happened to them, and he said, Well, they could always sue. I said, Based on what law could they sue? He just looked stunned and didn't reply.

    It's not "special" if it's needed to defend yourself from homophobia.

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