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Thread: tachycardia

  1. #1
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    tachycardia

    What a crappy couple of days with this! I have a benign tachycardia, meaning that sometimes my heart rate jumps up very high and I have to give it time and do this little vagus nerve trick to bring it back down. My DR checked my heart, there is nothing really wrong, I am not having a heart attack or damage because of this. Stress and caffeine level do affect it. The stress of the last couple days contributed to 4 episodes in 2 days, really hard. I have to sit down, breath, tell the people around me (because they can really notice) an just wait it out. I was super unhappy that my job stress caused so many episodes.

    So now what to do, I was going to contact my DR however we know nothing is wrong. I would love to tell a supervisor at work so that I can ask for support in reducing my stress level, however he is the primary contributor to my stress level. I am afraid he will just come around more and it will get worse. I just had camp at my site cancelled for December but I am expected to go to another site and supervise. I am going to make sure the staffing is enough to cover and I don't need to overdo the hours. I would rather be at my site with my staff I can count on, however I have several times been at my site 12 hours for camp (and had episodes every one of those days as well).

    So any advice on working with my job part? I can't quite figure out what to ask for.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zoe Girl View Post
    What a crappy couple of days with this! I have a benign tachycardia, meaning that sometimes my heart rate jumps up very high and I have to give it time and do this little vagus nerve trick to bring it back down. My DR checked my heart, there is nothing really wrong, I am not having a heart attack or damage because of this. Stress and caffeine level do affect it. The stress of the last couple days contributed to 4 episodes in 2 days, really hard. I have to sit down, breath, tell the people around me (because they can really notice) an just wait it out. I was super unhappy that my job stress caused so many episodes.

    So now what to do, I was going to contact my DR however we know nothing is wrong. I would love to tell a supervisor at work so that I can ask for support in reducing my stress level, however he is the primary contributor to my stress level. I am afraid he will just come around more and it will get worse. I just had camp at my site cancelled for December but I am expected to go to another site and supervise. I am going to make sure the staffing is enough to cover and I don't need to overdo the hours. I would rather be at my site with my staff I can count on, however I have several times been at my site 12 hours for camp (and had episodes every one of those days as well).

    So any advice on working with my job part? I can't quite figure out what to ask for.
    My advice is to get the doctor to evaluate these episodes. Take the day off work to get appointments if you need to. See what he or she says, what they recommend, perhaps more tests? I would ask for the doctor's help in figuring out what to tell people at work, as you might be requesting timeoff or something.

    It does not sound like a good thing!

  3. #3
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    At age 50 I had the same thing. When I saw a specialist he said it was a miracle I had not had a stroke even though I was a healthy weight and walked 4-6 miles/day. I had to go on a beta blocker to control it.

  4. #4
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    Wow, okay making an appointment with him.

    I did think about one thing, there are days when I am running a camp and have ended up working 12 hours. Those are not normal 12 hour days. In one case all I asked for was a supervisor to come over and give my staff and I a break. It was only 2 of us for the last 3 1/2 hours. No one showed up and we were over 15 kids until that last 30 minutes. I was having episodes then. So I want to say that making sure someone comes or that a sub list is provided with available subs is a requirement, not a bonus. If it falls apart then a supervisor needs to come over and help out.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Williamsmith's Avatar
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    I think a consultation with a cardiologist would give you the peace of mind you need to continue as worry free as you deserve to be. I only understand what I’ve been told by a consult with a cardiologist and I know from life experience that what is going on with me does not translate to what is going on with people experiencing similar symptoms. Medicine is much more complicated than that.

    So I can tell you that stress, caffeine and over dosing myself with alcohol during my last year of work and leading into my first year of retirement — funny about the same age as Terry —- I became aware of a skipping heartbeat that fell under the heading of an arrhythmia.....subcategory tachycardia. I wore a monitor for several days at home that provided the needed data, submitted to a stress test on a treadmill administered by a cardiologist which included a sonogram of my heart chambers during the testing and followed up with a consult.

    I learned to minimize my stress, eliminate my caffeine and tone down my drinking. That combined with a very small dose of B1 receptor antagonist or beta blocker controls my symptoms completely. Best of all...I have peace of mind.

    There are other possibilities best explained to you by a specialist based on your specific data. I’d keep that appointment.

  6. #6
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Very common in menopause. no stress required. But stress may make it worse. Magnesium is helpful.

    When I got it, I just thumped my sternum a couple of times and it subsided.

    There is some evidence that high-carbohydrate diets contribute to tachycardia via reactive hypoglycemia: http://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/...e-hypoglycemia

    I don't see any advantage in advertising a common symptom of menopause (or much of any medical symptom) to management.

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    I have this also. I was to told to take a beta blocker but chose to take a powdered magnesium instead (CALM is the brand). Went back to the head cardiologist because I wanted to go on an exercise regime. They did the tests again and there was no problem. The cardiologist asked why I was there. I explained and asked him why he did not tell me to take magnesium and his response was "We only prescribe drugs!" Read up on CALM. It may be just what you need. You cannot overdose because your body will eliminate what you do not need. YLMV

  8. #8
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Yeah, I had that during menopause, too. I dont go to the doctor much even though back then, I think I may have had a physician. But I didnt tell him about it, I just read up that it was common during menopause, I stopped drinking coffee for a long period, now all is fine. I drink coffee.

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    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post
    Yeah, I had that during menopause, too. I dont go to the doctor much even though back then, I think I may have had a physician. But I didnt tell him about it, I just read up that it was common during menopause, I stopped drinking coffee for a long period, now all is fine. I drink coffee.
    My brother in law had one of those "it's nothing just too much coffee" heart things and all seemed fine-- even monitored in the hospital for 3 days, they said it was coffee related, and then about a year later, it was revealed he had massive heart problems, almost died and needed heart surgery. Very touch and go for about 8 months, and 8 months where he was out of work, too.

    So I like the idea of you going to the doctor and getting more info, Zoe Girl. If it is interfering with work, and it is, then you gotta see what's going on and take care of yourself!

  10. #10
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    I don't know, but I'll just throw this out there. If you do need to talk to your manager about this, would it perhaps be good to be prepared to frame it as an ADA accommodation request? Only after making sure your MD is supportive, of course.

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