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Thread: My vegan pot pie a big hit

  1. #11
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float On View Post
    I've found that I can't eat protein after about 6 pm. This has happened before but last night is a good example. We went out for our annual Christmas Dinner with the boys but they couldn't meet till 8. I had a sm 6 oz steak with whisky butter and garlic mashed potatoes. I was so wired I finally fell asleep about 3 minutes before the alarm this morning.
    Your body was probably jumping for joy!

  2. #12
    Senior Member flowerseverywhere's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float On View Post
    I've found that I can't eat protein after about 6 pm. This has happened before but last night is a good example. We went out for our annual Christmas Dinner with the boys but they couldn't meet till 8. I had a sm 6 oz steak with whisky butter and garlic mashed potatoes. I was so wired I finally fell asleep about 3 minutes before the alarm this morning.
    have you done any reading on time restricted eating? There are studies now that are advocating a 12-14 hour fast each night, which is supposed to be better for muscles and fat reduction. We generally finish eating at 6pm and don’t eat until 8 or so the next day. If you think about it, that is probably what the body would have adapted to, as this is a very rare time in history when people had more than was necessary to keep them alive. Watching television for three hours each evening while eating Doritos might be the worst thing in our modern life. Also, before I break the fast with coffee, I have a large glass of water. Of course there are times when we eat at a closer interval than 14 hours, but this makes us feel best. Obviously in a society where so many have food problems it is worth thinking about.

  3. #13
    Moderator Float On's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flowerseverywhere View Post
    have you done any reading on time restricted eating? There are studies now that are advocating a 12-14 hour fast each night, which is supposed to be better for muscles and fat reduction. We generally finish eating at 6pm and don’t eat until 8 or so the next day. If you think about it, that is probably what the body would have adapted to, as this is a very rare time in history when people had more than was necessary to keep them alive. Watching television for three hours each evening while eating Doritos might be the worst thing in our modern life. Also, before I break the fast with coffee, I have a large glass of water. Of course there are times when we eat at a closer interval than 14 hours, but this makes us feel best. Obviously in a society where so many have food problems it is worth thinking about.
    Yes, my son has kind of persuaded me that Intermittent Fasting is the way to go. I'm kind of a failure at it because he tells me I can't have cream in my coffee in the morning at 7 a.m. and that breaks the fast, black coffee is ok he says. I tend to eat one bigger meal after I get home from work at 2 and something light around 5. So this throwing a big meal down after 8 pm was quite the shock to the system. It's taken me about a year to realize I shouldn't eat much protein at the 5 pm snack. I'll sleep good tonight, that's for sure.
    Float On: My "Happy Place" is on my little kayak in the coves of Table Rock Lake.

  4. #14
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    We were led down the wrong path by those who recommended "grazing." To keep insulin and blood sugar steady, research is finding that the fewer meals per day, the better.

  5. #15
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    I've found that I can't eat protein after about 6 pm. This has happened before but last night is a good example. We went out for our annual Christmas Dinner with the boys but they couldn't meet till 8. I had a sm 6 oz steak with whisky butter and garlic mashed potatoes. I was so wired I finally fell asleep about 3 minutes before the alarm this morning.
    I don't' think your body was necessarily jumping for joy, there is a lot that can be hard to digest there in my experience, definitely the dairy in the butter for me, for some the carb load (although I really find for me this has everything to do with how the carbs are prepared), for some the cow meat is hard to digest (in my experience one can get more used to it, but then should anyone really get used to eating a steak a day or something anyway ). If it's the protein for you then it's good to know, protein is more stimulating than carbs supposedly which are more relaxing or sedating depending I guess, wonder if even veggie proteins (beans etc .) would be the same. And with restaurant foods you also never know what else they are adding.

    And yes I agree about the hardest thing about doing a fast period is not being able to have the cream in well tea in my case in the morning. Miss it so much, just want a tea with a tiny (1 TB at most) bit of cream to start my day so badly, so attached to that ritual. But yea I have to have it black or not at all (and I've heard not at all is best of all) when fasting.
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  6. #16
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Beef is one of the most digestible things I eat (in fact, I'm eating some now), though I once said I could probably digest a piano...

    We ate steak all the time when I was growing up--it was a favorite of my father's. I used to bury mine in ketchup and onions; I've rarely eaten one since, not being a slab-o-meat fan--but the whiskey/garlic butter got my attention.

  7. #17
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flowerseverywhere View Post
    eating a balanced plant based diet with lots of veggies, beans, nut and some tofu or meat substitutes has served them very well health wise. They look and feel good, have lots of energy, great blood work numbers and so on probably way better than getting a lot of protein from mass produced animals.
    I'm "flexitarian" now, but spent many years as a strict vegetarian, and yes, my blood work at 65 is great. Great energy level, no pain or inflammation, very high HDL (good cholesterol). No vitamin deficiencies. It's true that "meat" is not the only source of protein. After 10 years of being strict vegetarian, and now flexitarian (and trying my best to only eat humanely raised animals) I'm very healthy and happy. I think these "protein wars" are like the "mommy wars" of the 70s, where proponents of one vs the other are very strong and emotion-based and too judgmental. There's evidence on both sides. I know a lot of very happy and healthy vegans. I also know people who wish they could be vegetarian, but don't feel well on a strictly plant-based diet. And I know tons of people who say they can't or won't live without meat in their diet. At this point, I'm thinking that it doesn't matter what we eat, as long as we do it mindfully. The greatest sin, in my mind, is speeding through a McDonald's drive-thru and mindlessly buying a $2 burger and shoving it down while trying to get back to work. Talk about de-valuing life.
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaneV2.0 View Post
    We were led down the wrong path by those who recommended "grazing." To keep insulin and blood sugar steady, research is finding that the fewer meals per day, the better.
    The Buddhist monastic way of life has very few meals, a large middle of the day one and a light 'tea' in the evening. I am planning the food for a New Year's retreat and it is interesting challenge (one gluten free, one vegan and one no nightshades) but I am up for it. One night is pumpkin soup, another is crackers and cheese and olive plate (hummus for the vegan). My one teacher who left being a nun however has better health now that she can eat more often and choose her own food better as compared to living on what was offered.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by flowerseverywhere View Post
    i think if I was so sensitive to foods I would not eat shared food Unless I was totally sure Even innocently people can add things that contain nuts or yeast for instance.

    the easy thing about these vegans is that they do their best to eat vegan, but if something has one egg or some butter in it they wonít turn it down. They feel like they do their best, but they are not going to be a huge pain for their friends and families. Of course, they have no allergies, which simplifies stuff. At home every product is 100% animal free. You would be surprised at how many products have a small amount of animal products.

    I made a chickpea sandwich filling filling with vegan mayo as well which they liked on Ezekiel bread. I donít really get the Ezekiel bread thing. They love it toasted with natural peanut butter and bananas for breakfast. My breakfast go to is steel cut oats.

    today I am making a shepherds pie with lentils and sweet potatoes. It looks super yummy. We try to eat as little animal products as possible, but at this point DH really likes his meat, and has a serving every day. He is a competitive athlete and would have to put a huge amount of effort to get enough of what his body needs during training. I just noticed an article about pro athletes that have gone vegan so Iíll be looking into that.
    I often donít eat foods brought by vegans, as itís just too painful asking about nuts, mushrooms, legumes, yeast... Iím more concerned with taking a dish that everybody on the dietary spectrum can share, and that does include me! I do sometimes get concerned by what seems a rather unthinking attitude by vegans: that everybody, even omnivores, can safely eat any and all vegan dishes.

    Of course, itís not only vegan foods I watch out for. Many omnivores eat legumes, nuts, mushrooms, and nutritional yeast. I did, until I proved to myself repeatedly that they did me no good. Then thereís fish! Over the summer, I was miserably sick for 72 hours after a very sweet person thoughtlessly basted my chicken with the olive oil and garlic marinade in which heíd previously soused the fish. He used the same barbecue fork to test doneness of both. My husband saw this happen (I didnít), but didnít make the connection, so he didnít think to warn me.

    Re vegan athletes and bodybuilders: they use protein powders, like pea protein. There is some concern about the long-term effects of protein isolates, given the chemical and physical engineering required to extract, spin, and mill them. If high heat is used, it may form deleterious compounds. However, the best place to get good information is from vegan athletes. https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.min...y-as-you-think
    http://www.nomeatathlete.com/supplements/

    Meat, besides providing protein, is a good source of minerals, fat-soluble vitamins, and B12. If your husband wants to change over to vegan proteins to maintain his athletic edge, it might be a good idea to talk to a sports nutritionist and possibly take supplements.

  10. #20
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suzanne View Post
    I often donít eat foods brought by vegans, as itís just too painful asking about nuts, mushrooms, legumes, yeast... Iím more concerned with taking a dish that everybody on the dietary spectrum can share, and that does include me! I do sometimes get concerned by what seems a rather unthinking attitude by vegans: that everybody, even omnivores, can safely eat any and all vegan dishes.

    Of course, itís not only vegan foods I watch out for. Many omnivores eat legumes, nuts, mushrooms, and nutritional yeast. I did, until I proved to myself repeatedly that they did me no good. Then thereís fish! Over the summer, I was miserably sick for 72 hours after a very sweet person thoughtlessly basted my chicken with the olive oil and garlic marinade in which heíd previously soused the fish. He used the same barbecue fork to test doneness of both. My husband saw this happen (I didnít), but didnít make the connection, so he didnít think to warn me.

    Re vegan athletes and bodybuilders: they use protein powders, like pea protein. There is some concern about the long-term effects of protein isolates, given the chemical and physical engineering required to extract, spin, and mill them. If high heat is used, it may form deleterious compounds. However, the best place to get good information is from vegan athletes. https://www.google.com/amp/s/amp.min...y-as-you-think
    http://www.nomeatathlete.com/supplements/

    Meat, besides providing protein, is a good source of minerals, fat-soluble vitamins, and B12. If your husband wants to change over to vegan proteins to maintain his athletic edge, it might be a good idea to talk to a sports nutritionist and possibly take supplements.
    Just out of curiosity, what are a few dishes that ďeveryone on the dietary spectrumĒ can eat?

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