Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 71

Thread: Work has gotten very bad

  1. #11
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Eastern Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,663
    Tradd: Sorry things are so difficult at work.
    Do you get a match on your 401k contributions? If so, it would be optimal to keep contributing at least enough to get the full match if possible.
    I too have been in a situation where the expectations were just totally unreasonable, so I can empathize. I think it would be worthwhile to evaluate what the "golden girl" is bringing to the table. You might be able to learn some things from her and she from you. While you have the knowledge and industry experience, she might have some general administrative or soft skills or other skills that the organization values. In my last role, I had a counterpart supervisor. He & I were very different, but we worked well together and shared our different strengths. I was aware that some of his strengths were more highly valued by our organization than some of my strengths. If I hadn't decided to retire, I would definitely have focused on that area of opportunity for myself.

  2. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    5,590
    So sorry Tradd, I have been there. This year has been the worst actually although I think it may be getting better. I have done a lot of reading on managing up and other topics this year, it is an area I suck at. But still for me it comes down to similar things to what you are saying, the basic data of how long a call took or how many tasks are able to be done in a time, but that time is not available. I focus on that as well, and I don't understand how my supervisors can argue or ask for more at some point but they do.

    I really related to long phone call interruption. I have a lot of 'soft time' dealing with families or issues that come up and that is hard to track but so essential. I started to track what I do and when I do it so my supervisor can 'coach' me. He is much worse at time management so this feels doomed. However the tracking is helpful. I got a paper journal, dated, and make notes throughout the day. I may write down a long thing that was one project, but often I put a chunk of time as 'task list' and then I have my corresponding to-do list that I have always used to back it up. Creates a little more work but I feel my a$$ is covered.

    About the 401K, lots of good advice already. I would stop contributions in favor of an emergency fund. If you are feeling as dire as you sound that would off-set any employer matching contribution. However if you are getting a substantial employer contribution then you could keep it in the 401K and know that you may need to take it out. It is a tax hit but not the end of the world to take out a small amount for emergency or relocating.

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    2,258
    This is probably an off the wall idea and I am sure many here will tell me why, and I will feel silly for offering it up, but just looked for customs compliance jobs in my area and first thing to come up was being a US Customs Officer, and you have both customs skills and expertise and firearms skills so here goes:
    Help Overview


    • Open & closing dates

      01/01/2018 to 01/31/2018
    • Salary

      $33,394 to $98,733 per year
    • Pay scale & grade

      GS 05 - 07
    • Work schedule

      Full-Time - Full Time
    • Appointment type

      Permanent


    Help Location

    Many vacancies in the following location:

    • Location Negotiable After Selection, United States




    Announcement number

    CBPO 18-4

    Control number

    487206200



    • Duties Help Duties

      Summary

      A fully trained Customs and Border Protection Officer (CBPO) is eligible for up to $45,000 in overtime pay. The starting salary for this position may be higher in certain duty locations, please visit the OPM website for information.
      The duty location offered in your final offer may include any geographic location within the United States that meets operational and mission requirements, and critical agency hiring needs for entry level CBP Officers. See the How to Apply section below for more information.
      You may also consider applying for locations along the Southern Border by applying here!
      This is a career ladder position with a grade level progression of GS-5, GS-7, GS-9, GS-11, and GS-12. You will be eligible for a promotion to the next higher grade level (without re-applying) once you successfully complete 52 weeks in each grade level (with supervisor approval). For example you could:
      • start as a CBPO in June 2018 as a GS-5 and make $33,394 - $78,394 per year*
      • be promoted in June 2019 to GS-7 and make $41,365 - $86,365 per year*
      • be promoted in June 2020 to GS-9 and make $50,598 - $95,598 per year*
      • be promoted in June 2021 to GS-11 and make $61,218 - $106,218 per year*
      • be promoted in June 2022 to GS-12 and make $73,375 - $118,375 per year*

      *Please note this example includes a range from minimum locality pay up to maximum potential salary with overtime earnings. Pay rates are based on the 2018 Rest of the United States Salary Table and do not take into consideration higher locality pay where applicable, recruiting incentive or yearly cost of living increases.
      Polygraph Information: You must complete and pass a polygraph examination to be eligible for the position. If you are a Veteran and have a TS-SCI clearance, you may be eligible for a polygraph waiver. CBP may accept the results of a prior federal polygraph exam in lieu of a CBP polygraph exam. See the Additional Information section below for more information.
      Learn more about this agency
      Responsibilities


      The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) is calling on those who want to help protect American interests and secure our Nation. DHS Components work collectively to prevent terrorism; secure borders and our transportation systems; protect the President and other dignitaries; enforce and administer immigration laws; safeguard cyberspace; and ensure resilience to disasters. We achieve these vital missions through a diverse workforce spanning hundreds of occupations. Make an impact; join DHS.
      Discover a challenging and rewarding career with U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), the sole organization responsible for securing the nation's borders. CBP employees protect our Nation's borders from terrorism, human and drug smuggling, illegal migration, and agricultural pests while simultaneously facilitating the flow of legitimate travel and trade.
      The video: Securing America's Ports of Entry emphasizes the importance of CBP Field Operations' frontline role in helping CBP accomplish its mission. For more information on CBP's mission, activities, and careers, please visit our website at CBP.gov.
      Being a Customs and Border Protection Officer makes you a valuable member of the Federal Law Enforcement Officer (LEO) profession. Typical assignments include:

      • Enforcing customs, immigration, and agriculture law and regulations;
      • Facilitating the flow of legitimate trade and travel;
      • Conducting inspections of individuals and conveyances;
      • Determining the admissibility of individuals for entry into the United States; and
      • Preventing the illegal entry of individuals and prohibited goods and the smuggling of illegal drugs and other contraband




  4. #14
    Senior Member Tradd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Suburban Midwest
    Posts
    3,034
    Tybee, I believe the max age is 40. I'm almost 49. I also have have bad knees and sciatica which would make the physical training requirements impossible. I'd also have to surrender my brokers license. They also want Spanish speakers and I am a dunce with foreign languages.

  5. #15
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Saint Paul, Minnesota
    Posts
    4,967
    Quote Originally Posted by Lainey View Post
    How can they expect 2 people to do the work of 4? Is there a requisition in with HR to hire another person? That's unfair to expect the same output with half the people.
    Welcome to Corporate America. I experienced exactly the same thing just before I left my corporate job: a minor part of my job was to maintain three computer servers that provided the software we needed to do our jobs. When Those Most High decided to change applications on us, those three servers mushroomed to a dozen servers full of this new cr@pware (and a very minimal support contract). It was still a "minor" part of my job. When the cr@pware failed, however, whatever I was doing was shunted off because it was (I was told) more important to fix the app/servers so the team of five could continue to work than it was for me to get my own constantly-shifting, never-reliable workload done. Not like I got any slack on the schedule for that. Not that I'm bitter about that at all...

    It's just the way things are these days. When I left I was replaced by two people, one who did my primary job and another who maintained the servers (which I understand now number almost two dozen [!]). If you're highly specialized in your work and/or getting up there in years and/or have on the "golden handcuffs" companies know they can treat you pretty badly before you'll lash back. It's unfair but it's reality.

    Tradd, I agree with the others -- fund the 401(k) only as much as they'll match and put the rest into your rainy-day fund. If it turns out you don't use it, you can always start your own Roth IRA and get it out tax-free (well, so far) when you hit retirement age. But you are at high risk for burnout. You want to make sure you leave before everyone wishes you had.
    If Americans expended even a fraction of the energy on civic engagement that we spend on consumer ideology, our democracy would be much healthier. Can you imagine people camping out to vote? -- Charles Roberts, Amherst, Mass., Nov. 25, 2006

  6. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    2,258
    Quote Originally Posted by Tradd View Post
    Tybee, I believe the max age is 40. I'm almost 49. I also have have bad knees and sciatica which would make the physical training requirements impossible. I'd also have to surrender my brokers license. They also want Spanish speakers and I am a dunce with foreign languages.
    Darn it! Well, it was a thought. I will keep looking! Would love to have you up here with us in Northern Mi!

  7. #17
    Senior Member Tradd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Suburban Midwest
    Posts
    3,034
    We only get the match in January for the previous year in one lump sum. I'm going to take it down to zero for a time. We can change our contribution anytime online, so it's very easy and doesn't involve dealing with HR.

    I've been combing through my budget. I have my $30 gym membership that keeps me sane with swimming, getting in good shape, and losing weight. Utilities are low, as it's only a 1 BR condo I rent. Budget plan is about $40 each for gas (heat/hot water) and electric (electric stove and clothes dryer). I can try air drying some more clothes and rein in the long, hot baths some. My rent is very reasonable for the area ($860)and I've been here 9 years. I pay $47 a month for AT&T Uverse cable. That's the lowest plan. I pay $90 a month for Verizon Wireless unlimited talk, text, data. I didn't know you could get a $5/month discount by using auto pay. I just signed up for that. I looked into switching plans, but it would only save me about $25 a month to go down to the lowest plan. Not much of a difference. I get a haircut/brow wax every 6 weeks for $50. I don't have cable TV and just have a digital antenna. My credit card minimum payment is about $350 a month. Car payment is $300 a month with 17 months left. Car insurance is about $650 every 6 months and renters is about $150 a year.

    My underwater camera just sold, so that's another $100 there.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Tradd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Suburban Midwest
    Posts
    3,034
    Quote Originally Posted by Tybee View Post
    Darn it! Well, it was a thought. I will keep looking! Would love to have you up here with us in Northern Mi!
    It was a good one!

    Also, there's not much for my industry up there. Chicago is the biggest "inland port," due to O'Hare and all the railroads meeting here. My entire support system is here, what with church and my diving friends.

  9. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    2,258
    That makes very good sense, and you ae in a good location for diving, with trips in all directions. We are a little isolated up here...

  10. #20
    Senior Member Tradd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The Suburban Midwest
    Posts
    3,034
    Quote Originally Posted by Tybee View Post
    That makes very good sense, and you ae in a good location for diving, with trips in all directions. We are a little isolated up here...
    I lived in Alpena for 16 months in 1991-92 as a reporter on the local paper, so I have an idea about isolated! And this was pre-internet. It would likely be somewhat different now.

    I can be to Hammond, IN (at the foot of Lake Michigan) in a bit more than an hour for the charter boat my dive shop runs. I can get charters out of Milwaukee and a bit north of that (Port Washington) 2-3 hours (at the most). I can hit southern Lake Huron with an 8 hour drive. Northern Lake Huron is 8 hours. Lake Superior would be a bit further, as would Lake Erie. Lake Ontario would be a longer trip. I loathe flying and the best part about driving to dive is that I can take my tanks with me. I dive steel tanks, not the usual aluminum rental ones, and would hate to have to use aluminums again (would have to change how much lead I carry).

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •