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Thread: Another decor question: shiplap

  1. #1
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Another decor question: shiplap

    I dont even know why I am consulting you all, the group that simply makes fun of decor trends! Ha ha!

    The spare house we are buying is a little house of horrors, one of the horrors being hideous finishes to the walls. They used some sort of papered wallboard in many places. DH thinks it is glued directly to original plaster. Living rooms walls are painted—something. Paneling I suppose.

    so since I do not have another 30 years on earth to renovate another house (the timeline for our current house), I wonder about throwing up shiplap on the walls. shiplap is the new darling in home decor. The look of it goes along with our cottage style house.

    or, is shiplap just the new era cheap paneling, remember that stuff from the 70’s? Also, our spare house has an entire room of that 70’s stuff, the room they converted from a garage. It sits there as a cautionary reminder about cheap construction solutions.

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    Hunh. Had to look that up. I call it “pine paneling” and it is on the ceiling of both of our new porches. The intent is for the salvaged, wider, pine paneling from my grandfather’s office (circa 1950) to be used inside the addition.

    i have absolutely no future in interior design. I like that which I like and it is usually not mainstream. So maybe the fact that I like it means you should skip it.

  3. #3
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    This article expresses what I was thinkng.

    http://www.mariakillam.com/best-advice-shiplap/

    It is largely a NO although shiplap might be ok in a small bathroom. But in the end I dont think pur hpuse is all THaT cottagey to have for shiplap from beginningto end. It actually wants to be Victorian even though the main part was built in 1941.

    Some craftsman in its history recycled
    Victorian staircase parts and furniture to make faux
    victorian cabinets, and he also laid a very pretty oak floor with a fancy border.

    I guess I cannot further disrespect this house, I need to be upstanding in giving it plaster look walls.

    CL, I think shiplap look is perfectly appropriate for any porch, even one on a 1980’s tract house.

  4. #4
    Moderator Float On's Avatar
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    I think using Shiplap (basically paneling on it's side) is fine especially on little cottages in ultra cool towns. Go ahead...you have my permission.
    I'm fond of this shiplap.JPG though I honestly didn't know you could buy it in panels. I thought you had to put up individual boards. I'd probably still go with the individual boards. I think it's a good accent wall and permissable in several rooms as an accent but I wouldn't do 4 walls in every room. That's overkill.
    Float On: My "Happy Place" is on my little kayak in the coves of Table Rock Lake.

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    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    I agree, being a big fan of Joanna and Chip, I'm all for shiplap!

    I'm even thinking about it for my new cabin. Right now it's covered in that old 70s faux paneling, and they painted it over in a myriad of colors. I'd love to shiplap the whole darn thing. I'm meeting with resistance from my DH and DS who actually love one wall being yellow, another magenta, another pink, another blue and another green. With red accents. It's a little bohemian/south of the border. Not exactly my New England classic cottage taste, but I'm not planning on changing anything this year, just to let the dust settle.

    Is shiplap an easy alternative? I'm not familiar enough with dry-walling and paneling to know.


    ETA: OMG, I looked at your link and it's gorgeous. Love it! That's what I would like my home to look like, but it might be too sedate for the over-stimulated tastes of my family.
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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  6. #6
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by catherine View Post
    I agree, being a big fan of Joanna and Chip, I'm all for shiplap!

    I'm even thinking about it for my new cabin. Right now it's covered in that old 70s faux paneling, and they painted it over in a myriad of colors. I'd love to shiplap the whole darn thing. I'm meeting with resistance from my DH and DS who actually love one wall being yellow, another magenta, another pink, another blue and another green. With red accents. It's a little bohemian/south of the border. Not exactly my New England classic cottage taste, but I'm not planning on changing anything this year, just to let the dust settle.

    Is shiplap an easy alternative? I'm not familiar enough with dry-walling and paneling to know.


    ETA: OMG, I looked at your link and it's gorgeous. Love it! That's what I would like my home to look like, but it might be too sedate for the over-stimulated tastes of my family.
    Shiplap would be super cute, and appropriate, in your cottage.

    I believe it is wuite a bit easier to put up over existing walling, rather than tearing it all off and starting over. I suppose it depends on how far in juts i to woodwork and fram spaces.

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    I have no real opinion on shiplap, which I like when it is used to make boats and have no experience with as decor.

    But boy, do I have opinions on the panelling you have now. Our owner-built (not this owner!) house was created beginning in the early seventies, and that panelling was everywhere. Gak. My only caution is in putting anything over it. It is so wretchedly flexible! Might be better to rip it off the wall first, though of course that reveals what lies beneath.

    (in our house that is often not a good idea, yet we carry on)

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    Shiplap is what houses in the South were paneled in from the mid 19th to early 20th century. Cracker houses have shiplap.
    As a house in Southern Missouri, I think your house qualifies for a Southern house and you have my blessings to shiplap the heck out of it.

    Catherine, we can sneak your house in on the coolness exception, because I don't think a house that is less than 1000 square feet should have that many different bright colors going on at once; it would make me nervous.

  9. #9
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tybee View Post

    Catherine, we can sneak your house in on the coolness exception, because I don't think a house that is less than 1000 square feet should have that many different bright colors going on at once; it would make me nervous.
    The guy who did the house inspection told me that he was going write up the colors, particularly the magenta, as a safety hazard.
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mary B. View Post
    I have no real opinion on shiplap, which I like when it is used to make boats and have no experience with as decor.

    But boy, do I have opinions on the panelling you have now. Our owner-built (not this owner!) house was created beginning in the early seventies, and that panelling was everywhere. Gak. My only caution is in putting anything over it. It is so wretchedly flexible! Might be better to rip it off the wall first, though of course that reveals what lies beneath.

    (in our house that is often not a good idea, yet we carry on)

    I like shiplap but didn’t know what it was called before watching ‘Fixer Upper‘. The word shiplap to me referred to the edges of green water resistant 4x8 sheets of insulation. I’m rooting for paneling and wallpaper to become en vogue again. Why not? Tastes vary. <iris lilies>, go with what you like regardless of trends or what others prefer.

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