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Thread: Another decor question: shiplap

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post
    I dont even know why I am consulting you all, the group that simply makes fun of decor trends! Ha ha!

    The spare house we are buying is a little house of horrors, one of the horrors being hideous finishes to the walls. They used some sort of papered wallboard in many places. DH thinks it is glued directly to original plaster. Living rooms walls are painted—something. Paneling I suppose.

    so since I do not have another 30 years on earth to renovate another house (the timeline for our current house), I wonder about throwing up shiplap on the walls. shiplap is the new darling in home decor. The look of it goes along with our cottage style house.

    or, is shiplap just the new era cheap paneling, remember that stuff from the 70’s? Also, our spare house has an entire room of that 70’s stuff, the room they converted from a garage. It sits there as a cautionary reminder about cheap construction solutions.

    Papered wallboard? Are saying there was probably some unsized wallpaper that they painted over as it was too hard to remove, or is it just sheetrock? Your going to have the same issue with shiplap, that you would if you bought 1/4" sheetrock (an actual thing I have used), and overlayed the walls. Your going to have to move your outlets and all electrical/plumbing, etc. further out.
    There is a downside to shiplap that I can think of. If used, how will you know it does't have termites?

  2. #22
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToomuchStuff View Post
    Papered wallboard? Are saying there was probably some unsized wallpaper that they painted over as it was too hard to remove, or is it just sheetrock? Your going to have the same issue with shiplap, that you would if you bought 1/4" sheetrock (an actual thing I have used), and overlayed the walls. Your going to have to move your outlets and all electrical/plumbing, etc. further out.
    There is a downside to shiplap that I can think of. If used, how will you know it does't have termites?
    We arent going to shiplap this house, after all. Yeah, the dimension thing is a problem, but whatever we do, the dimension extension will be a problem. The material on
    SOME of the walls appears to be a cardboard type material with paper over it. Ugh..but damn, the oak floor is pretty! And all new thermal windows!

    here in this house where we live, all walls were gone when we bought it, the house was moatly stripped down to studs. That made it easy, actually, because we knew exactly what was there.

    Termites may exist in one wet area of the basement, so we will have to look into that. It also has asbestos siding, so there is that to contend with.
    Last edited by iris lilies; 1-9-18 at 10:57pm.

  3. #23
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    Tore up the old kitchen sub-flooring today (asbestos vinyl fun two layers and newer laminate) and found huge (now dried) water stains under the flooring everywhere - dog, human, leaks, I don't know but this old house reno stuff is not for the faint of heart. Almost fell through the floor in several places. I told DH let's just replace the rotten stuff and cover it up. Ditto the peculiar holes in the sheetrock behind the old cabinets. Thank goodness for all these modern ways to cover sins. Let the history be. The irritation is that we pay hundreds to home inspectors and they never find any of this stuff besides the obvious. I am so ready to buy a cinder block house with steel beams and a metal roof and get on with life.

  4. #24
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinkytoe View Post
    Tore up the old kitchen sub-flooring today (asbestos vinyl fun two layers and newer laminate) and found huge (now dried) water stains under the flooring everywhere - dog, human, leaks, I don't know but this old house reno stuff is not for the faint of heart. Almost fell through the floor in several places. I told DH let's just replace the rotten stuff and cover it up. Ditto the peculiar holes in the sheetrock behind the old cabinets. Thank goodness for all these modern ways to cover sins. Let the history be. The irritation is that we pay hundreds to home inspectors and they never find any of this stuff besides the obvious. I am so ready to buy a cinder block house with steel beams and a metal roof and get on with life.
    I was somewhat horrified by our inspector’s report and I broached to DH the idea of just bulldozing down this house and building new. But then we would have an $80,000 lot in Hermann, MO and that is a pretty pricey lot for the area. dH is not terribly concerned about all of the stuff that came up on the report. He regularly sees these reports for his work and says that everything is fixable, for a price.

  5. #25
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    I have very VERY mixed feelings on home inspections. I know some who do/have done insect/termite inspections, and I would question their work, as well as having parents buy a house years ago, that after they moved it, standing next to the furnace and water heater, I saw a hole (not a crack) on the gas line that ran in between them, at eye level. What the heck did the inspector look at?

    I would have a VERY specific list that I would ask and expect results from a home inspector.

  6. #26
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToomuchStuff View Post
    I would have a VERY specific list that I would ask and expect results from a home inspector.
    There are inspectors and there are inspectors. Some are certified (for whatever value that holds for you); some "have been around a lot of houses". At least around here, none of them will open up anything that's closed unless it's a door. They would never see stains underneath an existing floor or a leaky pipe behind a tile shower surround. I almost see them as the fabled lucky lady who blows on your dice at the craps table. If things work out, she had something to do with it. If they don't, well, that's luck.
    If Americans expended even a fraction of the energy on civic engagement that we spend on consumer ideology, our democracy would be much healthier. Can you imagine people camping out to vote? -- Charles Roberts, Amherst, Mass., Nov. 25, 2006

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveinMN View Post
    There are inspectors and there are inspectors. Some are certified (for whatever value that holds for you); some "have been around a lot of houses". At least around here, none of them will open up anything that's closed unless it's a door. They would never see stains underneath an existing floor or a leaky pipe behind a tile shower surround. I almost see them as the fabled lucky lady who blows on your dice at the craps table. If things work out, she had something to do with it. If they don't, well, that's luck.
    I just paid a lot of money (1500 dollars) for a home inspection of a house we wanted to buy near my kids. Here are some of the things it revealed:

    knob and tube wiring, with live wires in the attic, in the insulation
    no outlets on second floor
    penicillum mold (to which I am allergic)
    uranium in the water at 7 times EPA standards
    radon gas
    wood destroying organisms
    water damage that might affect structure (was an oldhouse)
    non working septic tank and field
    etc.

    Cost to fix house adequately would have been about a hundred thousand dollars, which I do not have laying around.

    We walked from deal. We also had a friend who is local and a house inspector look at the house inspector's report, and he, too, advised us to run from the house.

    So yeah, I have had inadequate house inspections that failed to pick things up, but this has kind of made me a believer.

  8. #28
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Our house inspection cost $365 and it took 3 hours. It is pretty damned thorough. Mike, the inspector, is from our neighborhood and he is known amoung real estate agents here as The Deal Killer. He has to perform inspections to meet not only reasonable building standards of safety and sturdiness but also nit picky requirements to meet our city’s occupancy permit requirement.

    Lord how I hate the occupancy permit requirement of our city. That was not in force when we moved into our St. Louis house, our neighborhood was exempt for very good reason—urban pioneers lived in their old wrecks and performed the work themselves, and they had the political clout to keep the political rewuirements at bay. It is one of the things that saved this neighborhood.

    We would not have been allowed to live in our own damn house back then if that standard was in place. That is just foooked up. When we moved in we had electicity only in three rooms plus open studs plus lots and lots of other non compliant stuff.

    But fortunately that permit thing does not exist in rural Missouri, they would laugh in the face of anyone who attempted to install
    permitted requirements other than standard building code stuff.

    For owner occupied dwellings I think occupancy inspections silly. but they are fine for rental units. Someone has to protect the renters, they are clueless all too often.
    Last edited by iris lilies; 1-10-18 at 2:25pm.

  9. #29
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    I'm wondering if beadboard, which can be bought in big sheets, might be a good solution for your walls.

  10. #30
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by befree View Post
    I'm wondering if beadboard, which can be bought in big sheets, might be a good solution for your walls.
    I thought about beadboard but the classic use if it is on a half wall. It is something to consider, though.

    About our house inspection and why it was relatively cheap: it was a general inspection, and did not cover radon or sewer scope or termite or other, specialized inspections. He suggested that termites might be inhai itng one area and a termite expert should be called. He suggested a couple of other expert inspections, and all of those woild drive ip the cost of inspections.

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