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Thread: What TV Shows Are You Watching?

  1. #151
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    DoesHe talk about hillbilly music and Scots- Irish origins of much of this country music?

  2. #152
    Senior Member Simplemind's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by beckyliz View Post
    Country Music - A Film by Ken Burns on PBS. 1st episode was on Sunday evening and the 2nd was last night and #3 is on this evening. I'm not a huge country music fan, but I am intrigued by the history of it. A friend posted on Facebook that Ken Burns could read the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles and make it fascinating.

    https://www.pbs.org/kenburns/country-music/
    I believe it is Peter Coyote who narrates for Ken Burns and I love his voice. I'm not a fan of country music but I am a fan of Ken Burns work. He has done such a great job with his documentaries that I find myself looking for more. We took a trip up the Hudson River valley last year by Tauck in partnership with Ken Burns. We were shown several films by Ken Burns that went along with the sights we were seeing. Loving his work with country music.

  3. #153
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    I watched the segment on "The Sons of the Pioneers"


    See them tumblin' down,
    Pledgin' their love to the ground!
    Lonely, but free, I'll be found,
    Driftin' along with the tumblin' tumble-weeds.


    Written by Bob Nolan, born in Winnipeg MB 1908. Nolan rode the freight trains during the Depression. While working as a golf caddy in Los Angeles, he wrote "The Tumbling Leaves" on a windy October day, looking out through his big-city apartment window. (The Tumbling "Leaves" were transformed in 1935 into Tumbling "Tumbleweeds" for a film featuring Gene Autry as a singing cowboy.) Fascinating how the songwriter tapped in to the archetype of the American cowboy... In the imagination, we all can go there, even if we have never ridden a horse or roped a dogie. Bob Nolan developed a lifelong love for the desert Southwest,

  4. #154
    Senior Member beckyliz's Avatar
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    Yes, you're correct - it is Peter Coyote reading. I think my friend probably meant that Mr. Burns could produce a documentary on GAAP and we'd watch it. Iris Lilies, they do mention a bit about country music having its origins not only in Scottish/English/Irish music, but also how many of the popular white musicians learned at the knee of black musicians. Hillbilly music is about all they talk about for the first 3 episodes - that's all I've seen.

    Simplemind - I imagine that trip was wonderful.
    "Do not accumulate for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust destroy and thieves break in and steal. But accumulate for yourselves treasure in heaven, where moth and rust do not destroy, and thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, your heart is also." Jesus

  5. #155
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    In last night's episode, it was repeated how recordings and radio made it possible for either race to privately listen to the music of the other. And specifically, when Ray Charles won enhanced artistic freedom, he came out with a country music album... I Can't Stop Loving You.
    And an artist commented that when it's really good, "It's all One."

  6. #156
    Simpleton Alan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dado potato View Post
    In last night's episode, it was repeated how recordings and radio made it possible for either race to privately listen to the music of the other. And specifically, when Ray Charles won enhanced artistic freedom, he came out with a country music album... I Can't Stop Loving You.
    And an artist commented that when it's really good, "It's all One."
    The album was actually titled .... Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music
    "Things should be made as simple as possible, but not one bit simpler." ~ Albert Einstein

  7. #157
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    Watching Country Music too. Interesting to me how quickly advertising was used to promote various artists. Willie is a hero in Austin where I lived for long so always enjoy hearing his thoughts.

  8. #158
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan View Post
    The album was actually titled .... Modern Sounds in Country and Western Music
    That's correct. The album sold 700,000 copies in the first month after release.

    In the episode I watched on TV, they played one cut from that album, which was I Can't Stop Loving You. Ray Charles remembered hearing the song played on the Grand Ole Opry radio show. The original recording of I Can't Stop Loving You was a B-side single by Don Gibson (1958). Kitty Wells recorded her version in the same year.

  9. #159
    Simpleton Alan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dado potato View Post
    That's correct. The album sold 700,000 copies in the first month after release.

    In the episode I watched on TV, they played one cut from that album, which was I Can't Stop Loving You. Ray Charles remembered hearing the song played on the Grand Ole Opry radio show. The original recording of I Can't Stop Loving You was a B-side single by Don Gibson (1958). Kitty Wells recorded her version in the same year.
    I think you're still confusing the album with the single release of I Can't Stop Loving You. The album sold well and was certified as Gold for selling 500,000 copies, but it was the single of Don Williams' song (he didn't just record it, he also wrote it) that sold 700,000 copies in it's first month of release. Interestingly enough, the album's producer thought I Can't Stop Loving You was it's weakest song yet it sold so well as a single that some record store owners reported people who didn't own a record player were buying it.

    My personal favorite cut on the album is Hank Williams' You Win Again, which he wrote while going through his divorce from his first wife and recorded the day after it became final. Ray Charles' interpretation of all the songs were wonderful, but I thought particularly so on that one.
    "Things should be made as simple as possible, but not one bit simpler." ~ Albert Einstein

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