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Thread: Getting rid of a large piece of furniture

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    Getting rid of a large piece of furniture

    I used to want large pieces of furniture and I lived in an apartment. That makes moving more difficult. Since then I have changed and have gotten rid of most of the larger pieces. This one entertainment center armoire won't sell. I may very well have to cut it up into pieces and take it out myself..lol. Salvation Army at one point would not take it due to the size. I may have to try them again and see if they are willing. It is a Hooker furniture cherry finish armoire weighing over 100 pounds. Have any of you ever been in this situation?

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    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by simplelife4me View Post
    I used to want large pieces of furniture and I lived in an apartment. That makes moving more difficult. Since then I have changed and have gotten rid of most of the larger pieces. This one entertainment center armoire won't sell. I may very well have to cut it up into pieces and take it out myself..lol. Salvation Army at one point would not take it due to the size. I may have to try them again and see if they are willing. It is a Hooker furniture cherry finish armoire weighing over 100 pounds. Have any of you ever been in this situation?
    Yes. I had a big pine dry bar. It consisted of a mirrored hutch with a lot of glass shelving. Underneath there was a drawer and cabinetry. It was really heavy. When we redid our kitchen we needed to get rid of it.

    Also, we had an old professional Franklin Chef stove that occupied a big part of our garage for years--one of my son's drop-offs after he moved from a house he rented. He thought we would like it. Nice thought, but it would have completely overtaken our kitchen.

    Turns out we had hired a few handymen to help us paint and do repairs, and we offered one the dry bar (which he loves and still has) and the other guy had connections to a church that was able to use the professional stove. Best part was, they had elbow grease, manpower, and a truck. They took both away.

    I would try freecycling it.

    Unfortunately if it's one of the old-fashioned entertainment armoires you'll probably have a great deal of trouble getting rid of it since no one has the old TVs anymore. You may have to cut it up and curb it.
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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    Yes I have cut things into pieces so they will fit in the trash.

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    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    I just googled a picture of a Hooker entertainment armoire, and it would be a shame to have to trash a nice piece of furniture like that, especially if it's real cherry wood. Can you free cycle it but put a marketing spin on it? Like "Carpenter's dream: Solid cherry Hooker entertainment armoire can be used as is or repurposed as a wardrobe for extra closet space, or you can reclaim the cherry for your own project!"
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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    I agree, Freecycle or craigslist for free. Also, I know several people who have recently acquired such pieces for fabric storage, so if you have a quilt shop in the area, you might see if they have a community bulletin board or other way to post a Free notice. Sometimes Starbucks has a community board, look around for other places, maybe make a half-sheet flyer with a picture.

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    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    I have a husband with a strong back and a truck, and even I dont much like big heavy pieces of furnitureoutside of a couple of
    victorian cabinet pie es.

    This is timely. I am shopping around for temporary furniture for our weekend house and I am trying free sources first, then thrift stores. This week I spent half a day visiting all of the thrift stores. We also jumped into the truck and chased two Craislisted “alley finds” but they were gone by the time we got there. I am checking
    Craiglist three times a day now.

    Anyway, to the point: I want light furniture for this temporary gig because I will have to be at the other end of the piece when we move it in, and later out. I lifted chairs and tables in the thrift stores and rejected several due to weight. I truly think I can get ghe table I want from an alley. I want something cheaply made and light, but I want chairs that are a little more substantial.

    I purposely am avoiding sofas, and would not consider a sleeper sofa of any size. We will buy new beds and some appliances, and those will be delivered. I forced myself to go to IKEA and look at the cheap crappy furniture they have. At least the stuff is light,
    I will say that. I am considering their beds with built in drawers.

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    Thanks for the replies. Mine is just like this one on ebay. Yes, a gorgeous piece of furniture that would a crying shame to cut up. I will try freecycle. https://www.ebay.com/itm/Armoire-TV-...-/232638379350

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    Havertys gave me Habitat for Humanity's furniture donation hotline number. I'll try them too.

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    Two years ago when we were preparing to move, I tried and tried to sell a solid wood "entertainment" center. Finally, after a lot of Craigslist ads, someone bought it for $35; said he would repurpose the wood. I felt fortunate that he hauled it away but lamented how much we had paid for it back in the 90s. Recently, I watched my next door neighbor take a chain saw to an old sofa and every week he would put pieces of it in the trash until it was gone. That was a new one on me.

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    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    One of the reasons those wonderful, built-like-a-tank entertainment centers are hard to get rid of is that they were built for older TVs. High-definition TVs are much more rectangular than square, so where maybe you could fit a 27" CRT TV in the entertainment center, now you might not get more than a 22" HDTV in there, with a very obviously smaller picture. Some of the local thrift stores here won't even take them anymore because they just languish on the sales floor. As with so many things to be recycled, if there's no market for reuse, there's no market for collecting it.
    If Americans expended even a fraction of the energy on civic engagement that we spend on consumer ideology, our democracy would be much healthier. Can you imagine people camping out to vote? -- Charles Roberts, Amherst, Mass., Nov. 25, 2006

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