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Thread: How do you feel about counterfeit goods?

  1. #31
    Senior Member gimmethesimplelife's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tradd View Post
    You seem to think that protesting is the only way to go. Do those in your zip code do more than that? Working a soup kitchen, food pantry, homeless shelter, tutoring, etc.? All I ever hear about is the protesting.
    Tradd, hi! I very much agree that you have a point here. There are indeed other options here other than protesting, I'll give you that. In this neighborhood we protest first above other options - I believe this has something to do with how the police once treated residents in this area before we started standing up to them, and how the city has consistently blown off the 85006....case in point, we were pushing to have the city recognize most of this area as a historical district as many of the houses here are quite old for Phoenix and some are in decent shape such as the house I co-own that was built in 1930.

    The city refused to designate parts of the 85006 as historic other than the Coronado area to the West of where I live - but this was already a Historic District, and for some time. There is a lot of resentment towards this to this day. Low incomes and unacceptable treatment by the Police and treated as if less than by the City? Why should the preference of protesting be any surprise to you given these givens? This is NOT a middle class area - those standards are not going to fly in the 85006 - say I (gratefully). Rob

  2. #32
    Senior Member gimmethesimplelife's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flowerseverywhere View Post
    Protesting social injustices is not confined to street marches, trying to take a picture so they can sue or a zip code. Every day people fight for children, women, and a host of causes but the focus is on making things better through empowering those who are the downtrodden. Every day in courtrooms, classrooms, hospital rooms, offices and countless other places people fight for what is right. There is such a huge contingent of people in my zip who are fighting tooth and nail to Help the less fortunate. One group I am in gave $41,000 to women’s shelters and retraining for battered women. My library volunteer work group brings more than that to the local schools for supplies, reading programs, and many volunteer as tutors. People actively working toward helping people escape poverty and lift themselves up.
    Check out this organization some of my friends are working on.
    http://www.sozokids.org/sozo-kids.html
    Be the change you want to see.
    I agree with you here 100% in that protesting is not the only avenue to fight for what is right. I will give you that, Flowerseverywhere. Rob

  3. #33
    Senior Member gimmethesimplelife's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaneV2.0 View Post
    In my opinion, fighting social injustices--in whatever way that we can--is among the most important things we do as human beings.
    I could not agree with you more here, Jane. +1,000,000. Rob

  4. #34
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gimmethesimplelife View Post
    Tradd, hi! I very much agree that you have a point here. There are indeed other options here other than protesting, I'll give you that. In this neighborhood we protest first above other options - I believe this has something to do with how the police once treated residents in this area before we started standing up to them, and how the city has consistently blown off the 85006....case in point, we were pushing to have the city recognize most of this area as a historical district as many of the houses here are quite old for Phoenix and some are in decent shape such as the house I co-own that was built in 1930.

    The city refused to designate parts of the 85006 as historic other than the Coronado area to the West of where I live - but this was already a Historic District, and for some time. There is a lot of resentment towards this to this day. Low incomes and unacceptable treatment by the Police and treated as if less than by the City? Why should the preference of protesting be any surprise to you given these givens? This is NOT a middle class area - those standards are not going to fly in the 85006 - say I (gratefully). Rob
    With an Historic district comes architectural covenents, more rules and regs to follow and the poor here sometimes claim that as a burden on them.

    I am surprised you want that. why? That would be inviting The Official Bureaucrats and their Henchmen (the Police and courts) further into your daily business. Again, why are you interested in that?

    In another thread I talked about my neighbor who will be hauled into housing court in the near future if he doesnt fix up his property. While this isnt directly related to historic district requirements, he does like cheap and out of scope fixes. I am tired of his ugly ass air conditioning unit hanging out the front, his porch with no railings because they fell off, his peeling paint, his rotton porch dloor.

    He tells me he has no time to fix it up because he works all the time.

  5. #35
    Senior Member flowerseverywhere's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gimmethesimplelife View Post
    I agree with you here 100% in that protesting is not the only avenue to fight for what is right. I will give you that, Flowerseverywhere. Rob
    Plus protesting can backfire. BLM has done things like block highways, and it really gets people mad that are trying to lawfully go about their business. I have seen footage of police in a line with protesters taunting them, cameras at the ready, not obeying orders to leave an area. And then there are the people who start breaking windows and looting, which always backfires. Wasn’t it Baltimore that had riots and some stores, like pharmacies and grocers gave up and left, forcing citizens to travel for what they needed, certainly an unintended consequence. I often think it does more harm and puts the protesters, who often have a valid point, in a bad light, and can harm a community. Doing positive things, like mentoring or tutoring kids, working at soup kitchens and so on almost has a far better chance of effecting positive change.

  6. #36
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    I can think of one counterfeit good I have bought. It was a dvd of a concert, that the is no longer available (released on VHS ONLY, never on DVD), and is one I rather enjoyed, that the band rather hated (it was right after the nasty breakup/lawsuit over the name). You could tell it was a recording of a decent, lightly played or new VHS tape.
    I'd break it tomorrow if they actually released it on dvd.
    Not much counterfeit would I ever have an interest in. This is something that brought joy to me at a low point in my life, and honestly I am not sure where I put the dvd, as a couple years ago, I put away several things from this period.
    The closest I came to a Rolex, is a Rolex box I have from a friend who used to work on watches for a living. It is a dust collector that I should probably put on Ebay, since for some reason, people want stuff like that. Kind of like my piece of the Berlin wall brought back to me by my local football team, when they played the world bowl when the wall came down. No real need for it, or to get rid of it.

  7. #37
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    To answer the original question: No, not intentionally.
    Generic substitutes for more expensive products? Absolutely.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaneV2.0 View Post
    To answer the original question: No, not intentionally.
    Generic substitutes for more expensive products? Absolutely.
    That is the most economically and ethically sound approach.

    Although I will admit I do have preferred brands of whiskey, power tools, potato chips and automobiles.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post
    With an Historic district comes architectural covenents, more rules and regs to follow and the poor here sometimes claim that as a burden on them.

    I am surprised you want that. why? That would be inviting The Official Bureaucrats and their Henchmen (the Police and courts) further into your daily business. Again, why are you interested in that?
    I had that same thought. "Preserving the character of the neighborhood" can be an effective tool for driving out and excluding low-income people. It's one reason so many progressive bastions have such high levels of inequality.

  10. #40
    Senior Member jp1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LDAHL View Post
    I had that same thought. "Preserving the character of the neighborhood" can be an effective tool for driving out and excluding low-income people. It's one reason so many progressive bastions have such high levels of inequality.
    Don't get me started on the ridiculousness of the difficulty of building new homes in San Francisco. After living here ten years I've come to the conclusion that it will never get better unless the tech economy craters again ala dot.com bust 2001. We'll be moving out of this city once we reach retirement.

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