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Thread: Watching this fantastic video series right now!

  1. #1
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    Watching this fantastic video series right now!

    This is excellent. On changing your lifestyle to prevent and turn around diabetes and prediabetes. Highly recommend! A nine week series, free to sign up.

    https://go.ithriveseries.com/episode...tm_campaign=E1

  2. #2
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    So after an hour and a half of Episode 1, when do they get to what a person can do to combat the disease?
    If Americans expended even a fraction of the energy on civic engagement that we spend on consumer ideology, our democracy would be much healthier. Can you imagine people camping out to vote? -- Charles Roberts, Amherst, Mass., Nov. 25, 2006

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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveinMN View Post
    So after an hour and a half of Episode 1, when do they get to what a person can do to combat the disease?
    There are 8 more episodes, one each week! They will explain it all!!!!

  4. #4
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    It might be related to this trial:

    https://reason.com/blog/2018/02/28/i...pe-ii-diabetes

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    Video #2 out! This is so excellent! Watch until 9 tonight for free! https://go.ithriveseries.com/episode-2-live-qgrqqe0r

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    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    Harrumph. I think I can save a lot of people many hours and a few dollars. I think Jane is right; they're promoting low-carbohydrate/high-fat or ketogenic diets.

    Full disclosure: last summer I was diagnosed Type 2 diabetic. Runs in my family; had some risk factors for it; it didn't come as a huge surprise.

    As I believe we've discussed in these forums before, the American Diabetes Association's approach to diabetes care (and, therefore, the approach of much of the American medical profession) seems to have more to do with perpetuating a multi-billion-dollar industry than with actually helping diabetics get better. For whatever reasons, the ADA rejects recent proven endocrinological research and recommends daily carbohydrate intakes that pretty much require medication to bring back to "normal" levels ("carb up and shoot up").

    Some of us have chosen a different path. I've been on a very-low-carb diet since July (and was relatively low-carb long before that). I've dropped my A1c by 16% and my cholesterol/triglyceride levels substantially (don't remember the numbers at the moment) and my blood glucose is in tight control, despite eating more sausage, coconut oil, sour cream, and eggs than I probably ever have. It's a way of eating that's not hard to follow (once you acclimate to it); it has given me plenty of energy, and, because it has let me avoid medications, I will never have a dangerous hypoglycemic low. I am more active than I've been in years, which helps. But I largely credit my almost-ketogenic way of eating with tilting my metabolism in the direction of addressing my diabetes without meds and without the myriad complications that come from poor blood-glucose control and with giving me a way to eat that does not leave me crabby and always hungry even while calorie-restricted.

    Would that health-care professionals suggested to new (Type 2) diabetics that they try a LCHF or ketogenic diet first before moving to the latest heavily-advertised diabetes wonder drug. But (my surmission) there's too much money in the existing way to try such a simple approach.

    By the way, I will differ with James McCarter (in Jane's link); I don't believe there is a cure for diabetes (short of a pancreas transplant and even that is not guaranteed). The biochemical conditions which give rise to diabetes are not reversed by any way of eating or activity; going back to the "old ways" will cause diabetic symptoms to reappear. I consider myself "in remission". Will this work for everyone? No. Not my approach, not Virta's (Jane's link), not iThrive's. But it can work for so many it's a shame that more diabetics don't know about it.

    Edited to add: My apologies if the above comes off as crabby. If the iThrive series is what people need to understand their risk for diabetes and to address it, then they should go for it. I think the same end can be accomplished (far faster) with some Web searching (I'm happy to provide useful links), but maybe that's just me. I'm also tweaked by organizations like the ADA (and others, like Komen) that seem to be searching more for endorsement than mitigation.
    Last edited by SteveinMN; 3-1-18 at 11:52am. Reason: last graf
    If Americans expended even a fraction of the energy on civic engagement that we spend on consumer ideology, our democracy would be much healthier. Can you imagine people camping out to vote? -- Charles Roberts, Amherst, Mass., Nov. 25, 2006

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    hmm prevention of diabetes and prediabetes yea likely possible. Even if one is bound to be fat and can't help it for whatever reason, serious physical activity will lessen the risk of diabetes even then. Curing existing diabetes, not so easy (usually it is about managing), but if it's early on there is some research on serious calorie restriction helping recently.
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  8. #8
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    I've long been an adherent of various low carb plans--which I hope keeps T2 diabetes at bay--but lately I've moved to a looser plan of intermittent fasting, which has roughly the same effect plus autophagy. So far, so good, and I'm enjoying the broader menu IF affords.

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    So did anyone here actually watch the videos?

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    Actually No, Steve. These videos are not promoting low carb/high fat or ketogenic diets at all. You would be able to tell that if you watched the videos. They are really worth watching. I don't know what dollars you are talking about that people can save. The videos are free to view as long as you watch each one as it comes up on youtube for 24 hours. If anything, watching them and becoming informed could save you a LOT of money. Your second paragraph is just what these videos address.

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