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Thread: how much people contact

  1. #11
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    I'm with Jane. I LOVED working from home. I did have to go out on assignments but LOVED being able to stay home the rest of the time. I got more work done because I was not constantly interrupted or dealing with office BS.

  2. #12
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    I think I had a good mix with WFH 2 days and in the office 3 days per week.

  3. #13
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    I need very little human interaction. Sometimes, I end up feeling I need a detox due to too much!

    Hubby has high needs, so we balance each other out.

    I work outside the home but have had opportunity to WFH, and it is a very good fit for me. Currently, I go out to the parking lot to grab my morning and afternoon snacks. That's the only movement i get for hours at a time. At home, I walk and talk on the phone and don't feel so "held hostage to a desk".

  4. #14
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    Working at home would be problematic for me since my work involves children and having them come here would be well past my boundaries.

    but I could stay home and not talk to another person for days.

    in fact, my youngest just called and said she had spoken to her brother yesterday and mentioned talking to me. He said “you called her too?” And she said “yes.” And he said “poor mom! she was at the food bank all morning, then Grammie called, you called, I called, and when I called, she had just gotten off the phone with dad!”

    i like you guys guys and my hoarding website friends and the way you all stay in the computer and don’t make any noise.

    i do enjoy time with intelligent, funny adults now and then. And I check in often with my heart daughter at work. Mostly about my social interactions (was this ok, what is appropriate here...). She is leaving for a new job next year, and I told her “I’m afraid i’m going to have a hard time humaning without you next year.” She says I will be ok. I will also miss her because we can have entire conversations that are mostly intonation and body language.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Williamsmith's Avatar
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    I am an introvert who has been conditioned by my former profession to tolerate socialization. But since my retirement it’s been this journey rediscovering my roots. I could have chosen a path at a young age that led to an isolated lifestyle. I could have if my to be wife hadn’t chosen me like some rescue dog. I was a sight, long hair down past my shoulders, ragged sweatshirts and faded jeans. Not really a direction and an attitude to go with it.

    I’m pretty good at communicating one on one but in a crowd I’ll just listen. Big crowd.....I’ll get wore out. I can’t multitask anymore. My voice is out of shape. I did a lot of talking in the past. Interviewing and interrogating took it out of me. I want nothing to do with people for the most part. I could proofread reports and consult if I wanted to. Truth is, Old coworkers run into me and ask what I’m doing. I say, “Whatever I damn well please.”

    Work from home ....oh yeah, no problem. Going through the drive through at Tim Hortons provides me with all the human contact I need for three days. And half the time I won’t get the right change.

  6. #16
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Williamsmith View Post
    I am an introvert who has been conditioned by my former profession to tolerate socialization. But since my retirement it’s been this journey rediscovering my roots. I could have chosen a path at a young age that led to an isolated lifestyle. I could have if my to be wife hadn’t chosen me like some rescue dog. I was a sight, long hair down past my shoulders, ragged sweatshirts and faded jeans. Not really a direction and an attitude to go with it.

    I’m pretty good at communicating one on one but in a crowd I’ll just listen. Big crowd.....I’ll get wore out. I can’t multitask anymore. My voice is out of shape. I did a lot of talking in the past. Interviewing and interrogating took it out of me. I want nothing to do with people for the most part. I could proofread reports and consult if I wanted to. Truth is, Old coworkers run into me and ask what I’m doing. I say, “Whatever I damn well please.”

    Work from home ....oh yeah, no problem. Going through the drive through at Tim Hortons provides me with all the human contact I need for three days. And half the time I won’t get the right change.
    Hahaha! This is pretty much me, but I get my human contact at the post office.

  7. #17
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    I don't want to work from home at least not as an employee (self-employment would be a different ballgame and in many ways might actually suit me as I think I have the kind of personality for it BUT I don't necessarily see a lot of practical options for me there ...).

    But as an employee, oh heck no, I want an office I can go to and at least have workplace and homeplace (although work always interferes, it's 3am and work is calling ... well what choice is there but to pick up the phone and I have). But really I'd rather commute a couple hours a day than work from home as an employee, that's how little I want that.
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  8. #18
    Senior Member rosarugosa's Avatar
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    I do think it's important for those of us who live with a spouse, SO or roommate to acknowledge that we are starting with a different baseline of human interaction than someone who lives alone.
    I am also finding myself a bit more tolerant of socialization since retiring since I can now indulge in a lot more alone by myself time, and I don't have to give that up in order to do something social like I did when working. Work can both help fulfill social needs and drain the "socialization battery" of introverts, it would seem. I used to have sort of a rule that I wouldn't do a social thing two weekends in a row, and now that rule is no longer necessary (yes, "fun" is indeed my middle name).

  9. #19
    Senior Member Williamsmith's Avatar
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    So your new name is “rosafunrugosa”?

  10. #20
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    Definitely a different baseline. I love my husband. I love spending time with him. I have always slept much better with another person in the room (as long as that person isn’t noisy - like music, snoring is ok, or using lights) but by Monday, I really want him to go to work. Even if he played golf most of the weekend. And when he travels for work for a week - aside from the sleeping, it’s lovely.

    if I were single, I guess I would have to get some friends. Or at least a large dog that snored?

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