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Thread: Simple Living Books

  1. #1
    Senior Member Sad Eyed Lady's Avatar
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    Simple Living Books

    Several years ago when I really got into the simple living movement I bought several books on the subject. Now I am de-cluttering and getting rid of things in preparation for the latter years and I would like to do something with these books. If someone on here would like to have them, maybe someone just new on this journey, let me know and we can work out something. Maybe just cost of shipping. Also if interested I will post names and photos. The I am keeping is Janet Luhr's Simple Living Guide. Lots of good stuff in these books.
    "Like a bird on the wire, like a drunk in the midnight choir, I have tried in my way to be free." Leonard Cohen

  2. #2
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    I remember having/reading a ton of simple living and frugality books. And, after taking the messages to heart, ended up decluttering mine as well. The only one I kept was The Complete Tightwad Gazette. Good luck with your decluttering efforts.
    To the world you may be one person, but to one person you may be the world. - Anon.

    Be nice whenever possible. It's always possible. - Dalai Lama

  3. #3
    Senior Member Williamsmith's Avatar
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    I always thought that a simple living book shouldn’t be a thick complicated encyclopedia of chapter following chapter describing organization and simplicity skills. I want it to address the main points in a straightforward simple light issue. And when done with it.....it needs to go to somebody else that can use it. I have one book I kept because it was literally life changing in my mental attitude toward simplicity. It’s not a bestseller and I wish I could have met this lady beforehand she passed. She was special. “Simple Living” by a Native American Franciscan Sister Jose Hobday. 92 pages in a simple little paperback.

    https://www.amazon.com/Simple-Living...ng+jose+hobday

  4. #4
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    Love Janet Luhr's book. I reread it annually for over 10 years. It's in a sad state of "well loved" I've decided to gift it to a new young employee of mine. She and her hubby are on the Dave Ramsey path.

    The rest I've decluttered over the years. We nailed it and our goals by age 50!

  5. #5
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Williamsmith View Post
    I always thought that a simple living book shouldn’t be a thick complicated encyclopedia of chapter following chapter describing organization and simplicity skills. I want it to address the main points in a straightforward simple light issue. And when done with it.....it needs to go to somebody else that can use it. I have one book I kept because it was literally life changing in my mental attitude toward simplicity. It’s not a bestseller and I wish I could have met this lady beforehand she passed. She was special. “Simple Living” by a Native American Franciscan Sister Jose Hobday. 92 pages in a simple little paperback.

    https://www.amazon.com/Simple-Living...ng+jose+hobday
    You must have been the one who originally talked about this book in a post a while back; on the basis of that I ordered it and read it. I agree.. she was special, and that book is a great little gem.

    Here's another simple living writing I like. It's actually online for free so here's the link. It's by the Quaker Richard Gregg. I like to read it from time to time in order to reset my compass.

    http://soilandhealth.org/wp-content/...cityFrame.html

    "Voluntary simplicity involves both inner and outer condition. It means singleness of purpose, sincerity and honesty within, as well as avoidance of exterior clutter, of many possessions irrelevant to the chief purpose of life. It means an ordering and guiding of our energy and our desires, a partial restraint in some directions in order to secure greater abundance of life in other directions. It involves a deliberate organization of life for a purpose."
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
    www.silententry.wordpress.com

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