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Thread: Double Sinks--Nice-to-have, or Need-to-have?

  1. #21
    Senior Member jp1's Avatar
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    Regarding farmhouse sinks, are there actually farms that have them? I had several relatives who lived on farms when I was growing up, and a friend post-college whose family lived on a farm. None of these people had 'farmhouse' sinks. They had regular cityhouse sinks.

  2. #22
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jp1 View Post
    Regarding farmhouse sinks, are there actually farms that have them? I had several relatives who lived on farms when I was growing up, and a friend post-college whose family lived on a farm. None of these people had 'farmhouse' sinks. They had regular cityhouse sinks.
    Having been in real farmhouses I can attest no, they dont have farmhouse sinks. Nor do they have “bArn doors” the fashionable kind in the barn, another stupid trend.

  3. #23
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    The old farmhouse my grandparents lived in had one. But itís not for the kitchen. Itís for the laundry area to soak large amounts of laundry, wash dirty boots, rinse the dirt off the garden buckets, etc.

  4. #24
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    In the last house we built, I insisted on a "large single" kitchen sink. I find the standard 33"-wide double sink a tremendous waste for me. Most dishes go in the dishwasher immediately (none of the pre-rinsing or pre-washing so many people still do); the ones that can't (or take up too much space in the DW to justify washing them that way) go in the sink. But that half-sink is too small to manage half-sheet pans and larger pots conveniently. So give me a single sink.

    The house we're in now came with a mid-70s harvest gold enamel double sink. When that was replaced it was with a standard single sink. 22" wide rather than 14" and I gained countertop space in the bargain. Much happier with that. The sink needs to be replaced, but it will be replaced with another single. Whichever future owner this house has can reverse that if they want.

    We have a tub/shower in the master bath that DW has used much more than I have (as a tub) and even her use can be counted on the fingers of two hands. But it remains because a prime target demographic for this house whenever we sell will be the ability to bathe kids in a tub. Changing out the kitchen sink is fairly cheap; changing a tub for a shower is not so much.
    Success is to be measured not so much by the position that one has reached in life as by the obstacles which he has overcome. - Booker T. Washington

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveinMN View Post
    In the last house we built, I insisted on a "large single" kitchen sink. I find the standard 33"-wide double sink a tremendous waste for me. Most dishes go in the dishwasher immediately (none of the pre-rinsing or pre-washing so many people still do); the ones that can't (or take up too much space in the DW to justify washing them that way) go in the sink. But that half-sink is too small to manage half-sheet pans and larger pots conveniently. So give me a single sink.
    Grew up with the large single sink with drainboard to the side. For smaller standard stuff (soaking, no dishwasher), just used a rubbermaid dishpan and dish rack. Those "farm sinks", are larger still, and probably will be the next sink when I do the kitchen, as they are actually cheaper then ones with a built in drainboard.

  6. #26
    Moderator Float On's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jp1 View Post
    Regarding farmhouse sinks, are there actually farms that have them? I had several relatives who lived on farms when I was growing up, and a friend post-college whose family lived on a farm. None of these people had 'farmhouse' sinks. They had regular cityhouse sinks.
    Our original farmhouse did have a farmhouse style sink. Apron front with side drainboard. All one big piece. Dad sold it to a work acquaintance who promised money within the week....you know how that went...dad never saw the $30! And mom has been mad ever since that they didn't store it in the barn until it became popular again. In fact, just a few weeks ago while I was up there that same discussion was rehashed as we had breakfast!
    Float On: My "Happy Place" is on my little kayak in the coves of Table Rock Lake.

  7. #27
    Senior Member Gardenarian's Avatar
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    Double sink in bathroom - I don't see the point.
    Double sink in kitchen - I have one for the first time and I love it. Absolutely necessary if you hand wash dishes. I like it because dishes can sit/soak on one side and I can use the other side as needed for food prep, etc.

  8. #28
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    I'd like a double sink in the bathroom for hand washables, but I doubt I'll get one...

  9. #29
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    We do not have double sinks in the bathrooms, seems like a waste.
    The kitchen has a double sink and one side houses the dish drainer.
    The dishwasher is rarely used here.
    My grandmother had one of those cast iron sinks with a drain board off to the side, handy.

  10. #30
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    A waste of money, floor and counter space. How many times are you in the bathroom at same time , washing your hands after using the toilet?

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