Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 34

Thread: Our world water supply is limited...

  1. #1
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    5,023

    Our world water supply is limited...

    I know that some parts of the US have had serious long-term droughts but when city's water supply runs dry, what happens?

    From CBC: http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/water-w...nada-1.4578356

    Quotes:

    "Planning for Day Zero

    After a third consecutive year of drought, Cape Town residents have been asked to reduce their water consumption to 50 litres a day. If reservoir levels drop below 13.5 per cent capacity, the taps will be turned off, forcing people to collect a maximum daily ration of 25 litres from one of 200 sites.

    Growing populations and climate change are putting stress on water supplies around the world, including in Canada. According to a recent study, Iqaluit may face a water shortage within five years, owing to a growing population in Nunavut's capital and the rapidly warming climate in the Arctic.


    Snowfall in the Rocky Mountains is the source of water for tens of millions of people across North America. "The water from this mountain range flows into the Arctic Ocean and the Pacific and the Atlantic, so what happens here matters for the whole continent," says John Pomeroy, a hydrologist who has been studying the snowpack for nearly 15 years.

    Disappearing glaciers

    In the past, glaciers provided a reliable source of water that could feed rivers in times of drought, but the warming climate has shrunk icefields in places like Glacier National Park in Montana, which contains the headwaters of the Milk River in Alberta.

    Water levels in the Dead Sea, between Jordan and Israel, have been dropping by more than a metre a year. Jordan, already suffering from depleted reservoirs and a lack of rainfall, hopes to replenish its water supply by taking part in project with Israel to desalinate water from the Red Sea and pump it into the Dead Sea."

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/stop-st...ater-1.4575994 This article gives an indication of how people and businesses are coming to terms with limited access to water. It is no longer a choice but an essential.

    How close are parts of the US to Day Zero for water? I live near the Great Lakes but have experienced serious drought a couple of years ago. I feel a little guilty with having a shower every other day. How often do you shower now?
    Gandhi: Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony .

  2. #2
    Senior Member flowerseverywhere's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    2,357
    I have long thought this will be our biggest crisis. Diverting water to irrigate as in the Colorado river, damming and polluting all will play a part.

    You should read read the book “the death and life of the Great Lakes” by Egan. Absolutely fascinating on how a species would be introduced by mistake or intentionally and the effect it would have on the entire ecosystem. Flint and Love Canal are two big examples that come quickly to mind, and we used to live near Onondaga lake, which was considered the most polluted inland lake. Here is that information, repeated all over the world and country

    http://www.onondaganation.org/land-r...onondaga-lake/

    where I live we actually have two water systems, one for reclaimed water for irrigation and one for potable water. The better solution would be discouraging lawns and planting instead, which our local native plant society is encouraging.

  3. #3
    Senior Member razz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    5,023
    I have always been distressed that we use our precious water to remove our human fecal waste. There has to be a better way. Onondaga lake is a perfect example of waste disposal. Baikal Lake is another It used to have fishing fleets but is now so polluted.
    Gandhi: Happiness is when what you think, what you say and what you do are in harmony .

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    5,748
    I was raised with 5 minute showers, I still take short showers now. Most people I talk to think it is a joke or a form of being a martyr. No, we really need to do this! And why can't we compost human waste or incinerate or something.

    The snowfall level this winter has been very low in Colorado. We have talked about it, probably a year when we will have fires.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    3,478
    I remember seeing something about how this was something the military was expecting to be, potentially the reason for the next world war.
    At some point desalination and pumping stations, may/will become cost effective.

  6. #6
    Senior Member bae's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Offshore
    Posts
    7,328
    Where does water go once we use it?

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    3,478
    Quote Originally Posted by bae View Post
    Where does water go once we use it?
    Back into the environment of course. We have in our history, seen the effects of change in the environment (the dust bowl, sections of the Nile or other rivers which have dried up, changed locations, or gone subsurface, etc). The worry of course is the population growth to use ratio, as well as those who won't or don't feel financially capable to adapt.

  8. #8
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    VT/NJ
    Posts
    8,575
    Quote Originally Posted by bae View Post
    Where does water go once we use it?
    I'm sure you know the answer, bae, so your question may be a tad rhetorical, but the water is constantly cycling through the air and ground through evaporation, condensation and precipitation.

    I think the more stunning fact is that supposedly only 2% of the water on earth is potable. It's not how much water there is--it's how are we protecting the water, and ourselves, against the consequences of drought and pollution.

    I also believe that the greater evaporation rates of warm water bodies are contributing to the more extreme weather cycles.

    When it comes to the other pathway through the environment--the sewage systems & water treatment facilities, I think if we're smart enough we can improve on them using better technology + permaculture principles

    I do not believe we can make a big difference by taking shorter showers. When it comes to water waste and pollution, industrial and agricultural practices are the biggest offenders by far. How do we deal with that?

    "Water water everywhere and not a drop to drink...."
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
    www.silententry.wordpress.com

  9. #9
    Senior Member Williamsmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Penns Woods
    Posts
    3,154
    Quote Originally Posted by catherine View Post
    I'm sure you know the answer, bae, so your question may be a tad rhetorical, but the water is constantly cycling through the air and ground through evaporation, condensation and precipitation.

    I think the more stunning fact is that supposedly only 2% of the water on earth is potable. It's not how much water there is--it's how are we protecting the water, and ourselves, against the consequences of drought and pollution.

    I also believe that the greater evaporation rates of warm water bodies are contributing to the more extreme weather cycles.

    When it comes to the other pathway through the environment--the sewage systems & water treatment facilities, I think if we're smart enough we can improve on them using better technology + permaculture principles

    I do not believe we can make a big difference by taking shorter showers. When it comes to water waste and pollution, industrial and agricultural practices are the biggest offenders by far. How do we deal with that?

    "Water water everywhere and not a drop to drink...."
    Wow, am I relieved! I thought Bae knew some secret about the universe that proved our water was leaking into deep space and that eventually.....less than 200 years .....we’d be one mass of dehydrated bones cast about on a dried up sphere orbiting our galaxy. Except for the remnant that was saved by Elon Musks grandson who colonized Mars.

    Actually, I think the worlds water supply froze and was dumped outside my window and I’m hoping for Climate Change to eventually melt by July so I can have July 4th as a Summer respite.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    3,478
    As someone who spends about 8 months of the year dealing with an excess of water, I see it more as a location and pollution problem.

    we dug a pond 15 years ago. Ideally, we should probably dig two more. But the cost is prohibitive. I do plan to get rain barrels - not to “conserve water” but so that I can catch the rain and run it through the livestock instead of having it go directly on the field along with the piped in county water I am currently running through the livestock. I plant things that are thirsty and that have deep roots to open up the soil in an attempt to slow the water down. And then I dig ditches to speed it up....

    From a not very educated on the subject point of view, desalination plants seem like a good idea because you are using ocean water - which is rising, instead of further depleting aquifers.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •