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Thread: You really do give up a lot to hold down a job, don't you?

  1. #1
    Senior Member gimmethesimplelife's Avatar
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    You really do give up a lot to hold down a job, don't you?

    I'm not complaining here and I am grateful to have my current Site Supervisor job - I just want to state this from the very beginning of this post to make this clear.

    It's just that I realized this morning when I woke up at 3:45AM so that I'd have time to respond to the police sociopathery that took place in Sacramento, CA recently...........I realized that more than anything else I should be in Sacramento joining the protests against the Above The Law At All Costs Sacramento California PD - but of course I can't be there due to my job. I'm not saying this is wrong but it's really dawning on me that the system is set up this way - so that most Americans are slaves to debt and can not break away to protest injustice. This is how police departments nationwide bank of getting away with their illegal behavior - how tired and tied to a job most citizens are.

    I'm doing my bit against the Sacramento PD this morning as I couldn't live with myself if i didn't, knowing what I do about the American Police - but what I am able to do seems woefully inadequate giving my life experiences in the United States - something else to feel bad about now. It just doesn't seem enough, what I am able to do while holding down this job. How to make peace with this? I don't know that such is even possible, but I am still grateful to be holding down this new job nonetheless. Rob

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    There's more to it of course. People may fear if they get arrested in a protest etc. that arrest will make them unhirable. It might. I've seldom worked anywhere that didn't do a background check prior to hiring, so that's the reality: background checks as far as they eye can see.

    I wouldn't say whether people should be afraid of this and let this stop them or not because it's not for me to dictate the intersection between the moral and the practical (ie I'm not giving advice on whether people should protest or not, so much as thinking of things that might influence behaviors in society at large). Nor can I even put a number on the likelihood of it really being a negative or showing up on a background check. I simply don't know!

    Those who can more readily make a difference (I don't know maybe government workers have a lot of protections, certainly the self-employed who don't see a need to work for the man in the future are freer, those who have a means of support besides working - ie a spouse who is gladly the breadwinner, a retirement check coming in), can use that increased freedom if they wish to be more involved.
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

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    I suspect you hold down a job to buy food, housing, and everything else you want daily. Go ahead and give up your job to protest but don't expect the public/taxpayers to pay for your lifestyle of choice.

    Sure if you are disabled, etc., help should be provided.

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    When I was raising my 3 kids and working I didn't have time to watch a TV program let alone worry about protests. Now I have lots of time. I think we live our lives in stages. In my perfect world a full time job would be 4 8 hour days with 3 days off for better home/work balance. However, my first responsibility is to my own family to provide for them and then for social justice. I am happy to see so many young people become involved with gun violence and all the protesting, etc. They have the energy and the time)

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    I feel lucky to have any job, at this point.

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    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    I kind of know how you feel, Rob. I've always pushed my kids towards "meaningful work." At the same time, raising 4 kids I had to do what I had to survive and attend to their needs. So, I've spent the last 20 years in a great job from a financial comfort position, but I, too, often feel that I have sacrificed that "meaningful" stuff I've tried to encourage my kids.

    I don't regret it at all, even though I'm a huge proponent of Charles Eisenstein (Sacred Economics) and I hear what you say about "the system." But here is what I come down to:

    --We all need to work to live. So you get to pick your poison--and I, for one, don't believe work is "poison." My favorite all-time quote is MLK's quote about being the best street sweeper you can be if that's what you are called to do.* One time my struggling-artist-singer-songwriter son asked me why I chose my career, and I said, "I did it for the money." He was shocked that I would say that, so he pressed on. "No, I mean, you must find something creative and fulfilling about what you do." And I said, "Nah. I did it for the money." My personal trade-off for slogging to peddle drugs for Pharma companies rather than "following my bliss" was the satisfaction of sending 4 kids through college, maintaining my house and getting away from the poverty of earlier life (which was hell) and being able to choose the causes I wished to give my modest monetary support to.

    --which brings me to the second point. There are so many ways to live in alignment with your values and support your causes. If you have a couple of extra bucks that you don't need, there are a million charities that will happy to take it. Or you could find ways to carve out your time to be able to volunteer. It's not an all-or-nothing proposition.

    You are already living a life of integrity, Rob. You're not good to anyone if you are not using your skills and talents to the best of your ability. You need, and you deserve a roof over your head and a decent quality of life. I'm sure your staff is thrilled that you've chosen this pathway for the time being, as opposed to someone less compassionate and loving. Your calling at the moment is to gift your employees by being the best supervisor you can be.

    Is the system set up this way? Yes. But this is the hand we're dealt for the time being. Use your off-time to change it, but use your work-time to fulfill your own needs. You're allowed.

    * "Do your work so well that no one could do it better. Do it so well that all the hosts of heaven and earth will have to say, 'here's a man who did his job as if God Almighty called him at this particular time in history to do it."
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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    I agree with Catherine that you probably have many employees that are grateful for a compassionate supervisor. A good supervisor makes a huge difference in quality of work life. I was lucky enough to choose what to go to college and then grad school for something I loved because my ex had a good job and we were frugal so we were able to make that happen. He was a big believer in liking your job as he had a master's in math plus a teaching certificate but hated corporate life and teaching. So he ended up getting a apprenticeship to be a tool and dye maker which he loved. We paid cash for my first 2 degrees and I had a free ride for the other 2 due to my grades. However, he also believed in doing any type of work if you needed $ and nothing was below him to do. I really admired his work ethic.

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    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Funny, I have all the time in the world as a retired person and it wouldnt occur to me to go to Cali to protest the latest whatever.

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    I know a lot of people that went to our local Women's march but at my age I am afraid of some moron driving a car into the crowd, etc. That actually happened a year or so ago and the poor woman was older and will never be the same. I can't afford to be in any worse shape then I am)

  10. #10
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post
    Funny, I have all the time in the world as a retired person and it wouldnt occur to me to go to Cali to protest the latest whatever.
    Maybe your calling is to make the world more beautiful through the proliferation of irises and lilies.

    And btw, I'm organizing our annual mini-college reunion and we're going to the NY Botanical Garden where they're having an orchid exhibit. Can't wait!
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
    www.silententry.wordpress.com

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