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Thread: Cleaning kitchen questions

  1. #1
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Cleaning kitchen questions

    I now have a glass top stove. Having no experience with them, do I really need special glass top stove cleaner? It does appear that foodstuff is already baked on to it.

    Planning our next kitchen floor, and knowing it is unlikely that DH will allow a wood floor, I have a question about rough ceramic tile: is it hard to clean? I ask this because we have 3 tiles in front of our refeigerator, replacement tiles, that have a grainier surface than the rest of the smoothish kitchen tiles. I like these grainier tiles because they seem less slippery, but they also seem to be harder to clean up.

    I do not want my next kitchen tile floor to be slippery,
    I will be older and more subject to falls.

  2. #2
    Senior Member herbgeek's Avatar
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    Glass stove top cleaner usually has something in it (silicone?) that makes things really shiny in a way that softscrub doesn't. Is it really necessary? Dunno, but at least I know it won't scratch.

    Are you wedded to the idea of ceramic tile? I'm thinking if you are worried about falls, that maybe you might also want a more resilient material. Tile is definitely in the "break a hip" category.

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    Senior Member razz's Avatar
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    I have an induction stove with a glass top. I use dish soap water to wipe clean.

    A friend gave me some foam hand soap that cleans off any oily film wonderfully.

    Donít store anything above the cooktop that will crack the glass if it falls.
    I had a scare to smarten me up and become aware.

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    We had ceramic tile in the last house and put wood in this kitchen. Loved the tile except for the grout always looking dirty. Textured will most likely trap dirt too. We have a glass top stove in this house and just use soap and hot water to clean. The special cleaner probably has some protective chemical (silicone) in it but I don't like using specialty cleaners.

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    I HATE tile floors in kitchen, too.
    If he does not want wood, and I would want wood, I would go with either

    vinyl plank that is waterproof--some really neat new ones, much better than in previous years or

    cork.

    I bet you might be able to talk him into cork?

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    I have porcelain tile in the high traffic areas. Love it! It's been there for years and shows no signs of wear. It replaced glazed ceramic tile which was showing wear and cracking through / losing glaze. The glazed tile was slippery and lasted maybe ten good years, then we hung on two more...

    We have hard wood in our vacation home which has been down eight years too. Only signs of age are where Sun shown under a curtain in the kitchen and the color bleached a little. We don't live there full time, but have kids and dogs in residence most times for about six weeks a year. Only one scratch and that was definite damage, not usage. The dogs nails don't have any effect. one dog has "sweaty feet" and leaves prints, the other does not. Not a big deal, though. One must be careful with water, so the dog bowl is in a tray on a towel. I love hard wood...ours is mahogany, if it helps. A friend has something lighter in color and a softer wood, and she's not such a fan...

  7. #7
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tybee View Post
    I HATE tile floors in kitchen, too.
    If he does not want wood, and I would want wood, I would go with either

    vinyl plank that is waterproof--some really neat new ones, much better than in previous years or

    cork.

    I bet you might be able to talk him into cork?
    cork is an interesting choice, Iíll look into it.

    I doubt that DH ďgetsĒ the slippery aspect. Our weekend house house a ridiculously big patio and some fool covered it with ceramic tile. dH seemed surprised that I will be placing strips of no slip material not only on the steps but on the patio floor itself in a random pattern.

    Our senior citizen dog who already slides around here at our main house hates this patio, it is just too slippery.

    Oddly, our weekend house has hand holds all over the place, holds for steadying oneselve. Cant imagine why they covered oitdoor sirfaces with slick ceramic tile. Even the front porch has it.

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    In our kitchen and baths we used a pergo that can handle water and I love it. I understand slippery as I have fallen outside a few times and broke my little finger and got a concussion another time. Tile was a dumb choice for outside.

  9. #9
    Senior Member beckyliz's Avatar
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    I use a single blade razor to clean burnt on stuff off of my glass top stove. Also use soft scrub.
    "Do not accumulate for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust destroy and thieves break in and steal. But accumulate for yourselves treasure in heaven, where moth and rust do not destroy, and thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, your heart is also." Jesus

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    There is an engineered flooring that is "waterprooof" (I would correct to water resistant), that is made to look like wood or tile. I don't have a name, but it is available at most of the building centers.
    Textured tile, will hold dirt a bit more, but unless your not cleaning/mopping on a regular basis (example compare the dirt coverage under a refrigerator that hasn't been moved to your normal floor), it doesn't take that much more time. I know one person would used different tiles in a room, textured in the walkway and smooth under stuff that wouldn't be moved often. They made it up in a pattern that looked like a rug, and that allowed them to play with some sizes and colors.

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