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Thread: Cleaning kitchen questions

  1. #11
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToomuchStuff View Post
    There is an engineered flooring that is "waterprooof" (I would correct to water resistant), that is made to look like wood or tile. I don't have a name, but it is available at most of the building centers.
    Well, vinyl is "engineered" and is waterproof, and is available in rolls/sheets, tiles, or planks. Some of the patterns on what's called "luxury vinyl tile" are quite lifelike. But vinyl suffers from a lousy public image. Most people would rather take their chances with a picture of wood on laminate and replace it a couple of times than consider vinyl once ... You pays yer money, you makes yer choice *shrug*

    There are some laminates which are considered water-resistant and I could see that some urethane-coated engineered-wood floors or site-finished wood floors could be considered water-resistant from the top. The problems occur when liquid seeps past the top layer to either the plank substrate or the floor. Even a water-resistant coating won't help if the raw wood underneath is swelling.
    If Americans expended even a fraction of the energy on civic engagement that we spend on consumer ideology, our democracy would be much healthier. Can you imagine people camping out to vote? -- Charles Roberts, Amherst, Mass., Nov. 25, 2006

  2. #12
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToomuchStuff View Post
    There is an engineered flooring that is "waterprooof" (I would correct to water resistant), that is made to look like wood or tile. I don't have a name, but it is available at most of the building centers.
    Is it Pergo? I installed Pergo in my family room, realizing potential buyers down the road would probably frown upon it, but it's very easy to maintain and I haven't seen a scratch. I did buy a top-of-the-line Pergo, and I'm pretty happy with it. DH and I installed it ourselves--it's a floating floor.

    IL, in my MILs house, I used bamboo throughout. It's a ranch in which it's one long room going from dining area through the kitchen and into the family room, so I wanted consistent flooring. The bamboo is OK in the kitchen, but I don't think it's the best choice for concerns about water and wear. I wouldn't have many concerns about the Pergo I put in.

    I have to say, the bamboo was a strong "likeability factor" when buyers came through. Many remarked on the beauty of it.
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  3. #13
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    Original Pergo was not waterproof or even water-resistant. They now have lines which are (n.b., not all Pergo is water-resistant; the stuff that is is marked for use in kitchens and bathrooms).
    If Americans expended even a fraction of the energy on civic engagement that we spend on consumer ideology, our democracy would be much healthier. Can you imagine people camping out to vote? -- Charles Roberts, Amherst, Mass., Nov. 25, 2006

  4. #14
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    This is the vinyl one we just looked at at Home Depot. It's not bad looking, called Lifeproof.

    https://www.homedepot.com/b/Flooring...RING%7CNA%7CDS

  5. #15
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tybee View Post
    This is the vinyl one we just looked at at Home Depot. It's not bad looking, called Lifeproof.

    https://www.homedepot.com/b/Flooring...RING%7CNA%7CDS
    That looks nice, Tybee. You made me think of linoleum. I considered linoleum for it's eco factor (much more sustainable than vinyl), and also because it's cool in a retro sort of way. IL, because you love old houses, maybe you'd consider Forbo?

    https://www.forbo.com/flooring/en-gl...inoleum/cmlack
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  6. #16
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Ths linoleum discussion is useful for me, I will consider it. I think I am steering toward circa 1955 for the decorating feel of our Hermann house, It was built in 1941 with staircase and built-in cabinetry recycled feom a 1885 house. The front addition and siding was put on to look like mid 1950’s house, and there was a 1967 garage renovation into a bedroom. Now, we are going to add big garages and dormers in 2018.

    This is a very confused house, but I want to play up the cottagey feel of it. That is also when we were born, mid 1950’s.

    I dislike the idea of buying materials that “look like” something else, such as tile that looks like stone, or vinyl that looks like wood, or quartz that looks like cement (although the latter is what I ended up with in our kitchen renovation and I really do like it.) But the “looks like” materials do not age well stylistically, authentic is the key.

    so after that long opinionated screed, yeah, linoleum is a possibility for my circa 1955 house.

  7. #17
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    We put in pergo that looks like wood but is vinyl 6 years ago and it still looks like new even with having 4 dogs.

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    I wish linoleum was more available, but I know of no local carriers. (originally linoleum used asbestos) The first "waterproof" flooring I know about was bought by a sibling on closeout for a bathroom (Lowes had enough of a neutral color for the cost of uninstalled vinyl and they could install it themselves on a house they were selling, then changed brands).
    The next time I heard about it was a friend, who lives in the country, where my other sibling lives. Power issues caused the sump to stop and the basement to flood, where carpeting was put down, instead of tile, because of budget when the house was built 18 months prior. They were told if that happens again, with this flooring, they could pull it up, let the floor dry out and then put it back down.
    I hate to say this, but I am kind of hoping a big enough storm hits that I know if that theory work or not.

  9. #19
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ToomuchStuff View Post
    I wish linoleum was more available, but I know of no local carriers.
    True linoleum is hard to find. Armstrong and Forbo make most of it, and there are some smaller manufacturers, like Nova. IKEA carried linoleum floor tiles for a while, but discontinued them.

    Part of it is that lino pretty much offers the same pattern in different colors; it will never look like wood or stone the way vinyl and ceramic can. Part is that it does require maintenance. It should be "waxed" every year to protect it and keep it looking its best; it can look pretty good even quite neglected, but most people don't want to maintain floors beyond vacuuming/sweeping. And another issue with lino is that installing the roll product requires someone who actually knows what they're doing. It does not lay out quite like vinyl flooring, is seam-welded differently, etc. There are DIY linoleum planks, but that eliminates one of the better selling points of linoleum -- the liquid-proof monolithic surface. So it's a niche choice.
    If Americans expended even a fraction of the energy on civic engagement that we spend on consumer ideology, our democracy would be much healthier. Can you imagine people camping out to vote? -- Charles Roberts, Amherst, Mass., Nov. 25, 2006

  10. #20
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    I dislike the idea of buying materials that “look like” something else
    Me too. We have some sort of wood laminate Pergo type stuff in the basement and I hate it. It clicks when you walk on it and seems to have a static quality that holds dust and debris.

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