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Thread: Getting old: Defy or accept?

  1. #41
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    I watched the video. I think that the “after” version looks younger, but I find the “before” version more attractive.
    she looks younger than her age regardless of hair, very good skin condition, there's people 20 years younger than her that look a great deal older maybe not overall but in terms of skin than she does (and unlike many people it's not because fat is plumping out her skin as she's normal weight - so yea overall she looks great for her age). Used the sunscreen I guess!!!

    Plus she has nice hair regardless, has some of the mousy properties of grey hair but when the makeover guy plays with it you can see it's a nice head of hair. So she looks different and somewhat fresher with the new hair style and makeup but she didn't look bad either way and having to get the hair retouced every few weeks forever, well I don't know if it is worth it.
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  2. #42
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    I'll accept it. I've never felt the urge to dye my now-mousy hair, but I'm flirting hard with wigs because 1) they're just another accessory, 2) they provide all the color and variety I could ever want, and 3) I have probably half the always fine, flyaway hair I once had.

    I'm not a member of the Lucky Sperm Club. Both my parents had degenerative arthritis, and that's their legacy for me. But I can live with it, and be thankful it's not my mind that's going, and I'm only in pain when I move. I don't take any medication aside from aspirin powders, which I've cut down from daily to occasional use.

    All those oldsters who are driving ambulances, doing yoga, and climbing mountains in their nineties are the exception rather than the rule. I can attest to the doctor's claim that it's all downhill from sixty-five, but I'm doing what I can to mitigate that.

  3. #43
    Senior Member bae's Avatar
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    I am fortunate in that my grandparents and great grandparents on both sides tend to live into their mid to late 90s and then quietly pass.

  4. #44
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    My father, great-grandfather, and a few far-flung relatives lived into their 90s. One second cousin lived to be 99. The rest of them mostly expired in their 80s. Personally, I want to stick around to see what happens next...

  5. #45
    Senior Member Gardenarian's Avatar
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    I cringe sometimes when I catch myself in the mirror, but 60 is not the new 40 for most of us - it's still 60. I do dye my hair, it suits my face and coloring. I've never worn makeup (beyond some tinted sunscreen.)

    I have been plagued by health problems throughout my life and every year brings new ones, despite having a clean diet, lots of exercise, and meditation. I'm slim, fit, have a positive attitude, an interesting and full life, and I'm in a great deal of pain most of the time. It's extremely difficult, and I am by no means alone.

    I'm not resigned to this; I never describe my pain as CHRONIC because to me that sounds like it will never go away. And it's not just one thing - it's one thing after another. Yes, it's all in the genes, it's true, but there are work-arounds and I will overcome all this crap (and in the meantime do a good job of pretending that I'm just fine.)

  6. #46
    Senior Member pony mom's Avatar
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    I'm accepting my age (going on 52). My look is now very simple, but I try to make the most of it. My skin is free of makeup, but usually smooth and clear (on a good day) Often told I look like late 30s. No more hair coloring for me, but it's always cut regularly and layered to show off the salt and pepper look that is starting to appear (I call them my sparkles). Just started doing yoga and I've been lucky to have been very thin my entire life. Aches and pains more often now.

    Keeping a positive outlook on just about everything keeps you more child-like. Find humor anywhere you can. Do the things you love for as long as you can. When you can't, find something different. Working at an assisted living facility, I've seen seniors of all ages. Some still care about their appearance, and others don't. The ones that don't look older.

  7. #47
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    I got to the point that I don't think about how old I am. I used to know right away, but now I have to do the math, and I'm very good at math! In my experience, I have died and have been reborn during some critical times in my life. It really is just a number. I have some gray in my hair and I won't be doing anything about it.

  8. #48
    Senior Member HappyHiker's Avatar
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    Good topic. I am doing my very best to make peace with growing old(er). It's inevitable. I do admit to reading the obits in my local paper and cheering when someone's died who is quite a bit older than me...and booing when the dearly departed is younger than me.

    A new book by Barbara Ehrenreich is titled: Natural Causes

    One review says "Natural Causes examines the ways in which we obsess over death, our bodies, and our health. Both funny and caustic, Ehrenreich then tackles the seemingly unsolvable problem of how we might better prepare ourselves for the end—while still reveling in the lives that remain to us."

    Have the book reserved at the library...sounds fascinating. She's a great writer -- loved her Nickel & Dimed examining the lives of those trying to survive on minimum wage jobs..she went undercover to live their lives and to experience, first-hand, their struggle.

    I rather like Woody Allen's take on life--the progression of living should be reversed -- we should end our lives as an orgasm, rather than begin it as one...
    Author of the green eco-thriller: Falling Through Time http://fallingthroughtime.com Editor of http://vibrantvillage.com

  9. #49
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    Hard as it is....I accept physical aging. I accept that my knee injury 3y ago will continue to escalate pain and I will not recover enough for full weight bearing. Total knee June 6. By August-normal gait. September-stairs difficult but pain free. Next year? -I will hike and ski again!

    I will take advantage of known and proven remedies!

  10. #50
    Senior Member Rogar's Avatar
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    I'm in my early 60's and healthy for my age. I exercise regularly, have done some yoga or just simple stretches much of my adult life, and have never been much of a carnivore. My brother on the other hand has basically been the opposite. He has a handful of common health ailments that elderly people accumulate and is on multiple medications. I understand that genetics and health are undeniably linked and that I have been lucky. However, I don't think a good exercise routine, a healthy diet, and what ever else we associate with good anti-aging habits are denial, but just make good sense and might be more important as our bodies become less resilient.

    I remember, as a baby boomer, the ads like "you're in the Pepsi generation", and a common stigma that old is bad and young is good. Other cultures seem to have a different view of the elderly and more respect for their life experiences. I don't have intentions to act or dress differently only to seem younger than my age. There are probably a lot of things that are indeed all downhill after a certain age, but there is another part of being older that is not so bad. At my point in things life seems a little slower and contemplative. I accept those negative and positives that we really don't have any control over.

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