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Thread: High Blood Pressure and renal failure

  1. #11
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
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    Be aware of the side effects of all the drugs doctors like to push these days. Many, many of them list kidney damage as possible side effects, and I imagine the cumulative synergistic effect of several of them is devastating. I suspect that's what tipped my SO over into kidney failure.

  2. #12
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ultralight View Post
    Can BP be lowered to reasonable levels through diet alone?
    Kind of depends on how much higher it is now than normal. A BP of, say, 140/100 might see some relief through diet (or relaxation techniques, etc.) because both diet and stress management are used to combat hypertension. BP of 170/125, probably not (or not much).

    I'm not sure what foods you'd want to either avoid or encourage; salt used to be Public Enemy #1 for hypertension, but I've asked a bunch of my hypertensive friends and none of their doctors discuss reducing salt intake anymore (unless yours is on some other planet due to eating lots of processed foods or meals outside the home; that's an easy fix). Losing weight certainly would not hurt the cause of reducing blood pressure, so diet plays into that as well. But, again, this depends on how far the BP has to go down.

    Though I do not recommend this (not a doctor, haven't examined you, etc.) there are foods and supplements which have the same basic actions as some hypertension medications. For example, one of my BP drugs is a diuretic; there are plants which have diuretic properties. But I'm just saying it's an option because I know you have this "thing" about taking medicine. Frankly, if you want to live a mobile life for many more years, I'd say pull up the big-boy underwear and take hypertension medication, at least until you can get your BP under control by other means. If your BP is not so high, your health care provider may prescribe low doses of more than one medication so you don't get hit with the side effects of a larger dose of the medication. If your BP is high, you do yourself no favors by waiting to treat it. The damage is silent and often irreversible.
    If Americans expended even a fraction of the energy on civic engagement that we spend on consumer ideology, our democracy would be much healthier. Can you imagine people camping out to vote? -- Charles Roberts, Amherst, Mass., Nov. 25, 2006

  3. #13
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    Yes. Check your library. My mother recently finished a book about reducing your blood pressure over 30 days and she has had success with this, reducing the amount of medication she takes (with her doctor's approval).

  4. #14
    Senior Member Ultralight's Avatar
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    Well, I am going to talk to my doctor about it.

    I think that for the past couple years I have been on this borderland of youthful, easy health and middle aged, midwestern spiraling into unhealthiness.

    But I see health people older than me -- in their 40s and 50s.

    What I notice is that they are very active, fairly social, and they don't eat too much; and what they do eat is fairly healthy or even very healthy.

    I am somewhat active -- I do a little jump rope, walk to work 4-5 times a week (a mile there and a mile back). I do some push-ups. haha

    But I eat WAAAAAAY too much and I tend to eat some salty foods, lots of rice too. I am almost 200 elbeez and only 5'9".
    I came from a real tough neighborhood. I put my hand in some cement and felt another hand." -- Rodney Dangerfield

  5. #15
    Senior Member SteveinMN's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ultralight View Post
    Well, I am going to talk to my doctor about it.
    Good to hear!

    Age is a heartless b----. Some folks have done well in the genetic lottery; some haven't. I'm of the belief that there's lots about the human body we don't yet know (my vision is that of Bones McCoy reading about what the 2018 world is cutting-edge medical care and declaring us barbarians for what we still believe to be true) and that there's only so much we can will ourselves to do to get beyond genetics and past personal histories we can't change.

    Then there's the matter of finding what works for you personally. I could walk 4-5 miles -- or I could go dancing. It's pretty much the same exercise but I enjoy one a whole lot more and will seek opportunities to dance even when I don't want to walk anywhere. Ways of eating also are a personal preference. I tried a bunch of them over the decades; a ketogenic diet is the one that I could stick with (and which has had great results). There is no One True Path and I'm not sure anyone could measure a lifespan's deviation from one if it existed.

    Good luck!
    If Americans expended even a fraction of the energy on civic engagement that we spend on consumer ideology, our democracy would be much healthier. Can you imagine people camping out to vote? -- Charles Roberts, Amherst, Mass., Nov. 25, 2006

  6. #16
    Senior Member Ultralight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveinMN View Post

    Good luck!

    Thanks!
    I came from a real tough neighborhood. I put my hand in some cement and felt another hand." -- Rodney Dangerfield

  7. #17
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    I post about Kidney because my sister at 60 years old had high pressure for years that had been easily
    controlled by exercise, diet and meds.
    Then suddenly it went much higher for no apparent reason (she was slim enough, exercised and ate well).
    Her doctor sent her for tests and she had lost 15% kidney function snice the previous year. Within 6 months she was
    in full renal failure and on dialysis full time.
    The higher blood pressure was a symptom of the renal failure, so only treating the blood pressure would not have been the answer.
    There are many causes of high blood pressure.
    And, Yes, Aging is a Bit***h!

  8. #18
    Senior Member jp1's Avatar
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    After over a decade of being borderline (130-140/80-82) my BP gradually creeped up over the past six months to where I was consistently getting numbers more in the 150-155/80-85 range. Started a low dose of a combo med Friday and yesterday I was 121-64. The results weren't supposed to be instantaneous but I'm not complaining.

    Doc didn't talk too much about diet beyond asking if I cook with salt and how much we cook for ourselves.

  9. #19
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    Only some people respond to a low salt diet. Others - it makes no difference either way for BP control.

  10. #20
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    Everyone on my Mom's side of the family eventually get HBP. No one has had renal failure. Everyone got it between 31-50 regardless of weight, diet, exercise, etc. At 50 I was thin and walking 8-10 miles/day. Not only did I have BP in the stroke range I had an erratic, too fast heartbeat. I was put right in the hospital. I am on a beta blocker and a dietetic. No matter which brand I am on they all make me tired and I gained weight because the beta blocker slows down my metabolism. I still walk 4 miles/day and struggle to keep my weight down. I am 30 lbs over weight but it is the best I can do.

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