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Thread: Your Best Year?

  1. #21
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post
    I dont know my best year. I remember coming out of the fog of my 20’s and entering 30’s, so that was a good period. My 30’s were my best dcade.

    I didnt really like my 40’s decade although not much bad happened, well, my father died a few weeks before
    I turned 40. I suppose a shrink would say that colored that decade with the finality of mortality but that was the only bad thing. I looked forward to turning 50 and getting out of that decade of the 40’s, and 50’s and 60’s have been good.
    Just recently, DH and I were battering around the idea of getting another dog, and my knee jerk reaction was "I'm not ready for the responsibility of another dog. I'm tired of being responsible."

    It just sort of slipped out, but there's a lot of truth to that, which is one reason getting older, after raising 4 kids and 2 dogs, has been a very liberating experience for me. I love my life now. My 60s is a pretty good decade. I've always spent too much energy worrying about people in my care at the expense of self-care, so it's a good time for me to cut the cords and "wear purple."
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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  2. #22
    Senior Member iris lilies's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by catherine View Post
    Just recently, DH and I were battering around the idea of getting another dog, and my knee jerk reaction was "I'm not ready for the responsibility of another dog. I'm tired of being responsible."

    It just sort of slipped out, but there's a lot of truth to that, which is one reason getting older, after raising 4 kids and 2 dogs, has been a very liberating experience for me. I love my life now. My 60s is a pretty good decade. I've always spent too much energy worrying about people in my care at the expense of self-care, so it's a good time for me to cut the cords and "wear purple."

    This is why fostering is fun, you can always give them back. I do mean that for fostering a breed that is popular, like our bulldogs, that are fairly easy to place.

    cats, now that is a different story, there just are not enough homes for cats.I took on “fostering” a young cat for someone with my eyes wide open that this may become my permenant cat.

    I am thinking ahead to when our current special dog dies, and
    I will not be able to rush out and adopt another dog, but we will have foster dogs around to keep us company while we work through the grief of a major dog loss.

  3. #23
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    I know for sure it's not this one.
    no kidding

    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post
    I didnt really like my 40’s decade although not much bad happened, well, my father died a few weeks before
    I turned 40.
    there is statistical support for some years being happier than others, I mean 40s or so tends to be people's unhappiest years around the world if circumstances are adjusted for (but circumstances are pretty important yea yea of course VERY, but if they just abstract them out and analyze the data, so I have heard from happiness researchers).

    Here's an exceedingly long article on it:
    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine...crisis/382235/

    I guess my early 30s weren't bad, I was working part time, steady and decent enough paycheck, doing a lot of volunteering in things I believe in. Wasn't in a relationship, an off and on long distance affair well yea, but it was far from central to my life. Working for free at things I believed in, steady job at 30 hours a week and decent pay, and hanging out a lot with a good platonic much older male friend, it was good.
    If you want something to get done, ask a busy person. If you want them to have a nervous breakdown that is.

  4. #24
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iris lilies View Post
    I am thinking ahead to when our current special dog dies, and
    I will not be able to rush out and adopt another dog, but we will have foster dogs around to keep us company while we work through the grief of a major dog loss.
    My daughter is a big proponent of fostering, but when I think of her, it doesn't make me WANT to foster because she wound up keeping both dogs she started out fostering. The last dog she fostered was placed with a family two hours away from her, and she had a bad feeling about the guy, and it kept her up for 3 nights and then she made her boyfriend drive her to the guy's house and retrieve the dog, and she's had him ever since. So that tells me it's not always easy to give a dog up once you love them.

    IL, yes, as you allude to, I'm still grieving my dog. I really miss her, but I haven't gotten to the place where I can say maybe another dog will be as special as she was.
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
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