Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Have you ever cut a table in half??

  1. #1
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    VT/NJ
    Posts
    7,916

    Have you ever cut a table in half??

    A few months ago, DH and I found a Boos island/table. For our new lake cabin, we need something next to the stove in an approximately 2' x 2' space, and I was looking for a quality 2nd-hand butcher block.

    So we just ran into this one (pictured) in the consignment shop that has provided many of the furnishings in our current home over the years. Even though I wasn't sure about whether or not it would fit we bought it for $375. (New Boos tables go for over $1200). I was a bit nervous because the table is the right width (24") but not really the right depth (48"). I figured we could use it as an island/peninsula.

    BUT when we went up in March it was very clear to me that the double-wide butcher block was not going to work. On the way home we had the brilliant idea to cut the table in half and then brace the legless half against the wall next to the stove.

    Any suggestions on how to cut this sucker in half? Should we go to a professional or would we be able to just draw a straight line and do it ourselves. If we do it ourselves, what kind of saw do we need?

    IMG_3984.jpg
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
    www.silententry.wordpress.com

  2. #2
    Simpleton Alan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    5,482
    I've never cut a table in half but I have cut a butcher block surface down to size. Yours looks to be at least 4" thick and I don't think I'd try that myself unless I had a band saw, a belt sander and a router to round the cut edges. I believe I'd take it to a pro since I come from the Dirty Harry school of woodworking, "A man's gotta know his limitations."
    "Things should be made as simple as possible, but not one bit simpler." ~ Albert Einstein

  3. #3
    Senior Member jp1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    3,662
    I agree with Alan. Buying the appropriate tools for the job would probably cost more than hiring a pro. And since you will be living with this for a long time you want it to look really good.

    Pretty table. I can see why you bought it.

  4. #4
    Senior Member bae's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Offshore
    Posts
    7,005
    I have the tools to do this. They are a bit spendy. For a single piece of work like this, if I didn't have the gear/skill, I'd find someone who has the tools and skills, and talk them into it.

    (Depending on the construction of the thing, I'd be tempted to measure/mark twice, then cut it a tad oversized with a crosscut loggging saw I have, or a chainsaw, then sand it to size/contour. Don't be like me.)

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    2,068
    Yes, my mind went first to chainsaw, then Sawsall. I bet somebody in Vermont can do this--move it whole, then ask around.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    2,604
    Take your picture to or send it to the local woodworking store. Indy has at least two of them. Almost anyone there will have an opinion on how to go about it and maybe know someone who has the tools.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Gardenarian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    4,013
    I'd sell it and buy one that fits.

  8. #8
    Senior Member JaneV2.0's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    8,909
    Quote Originally Posted by Gardenarian View Post
    I'd sell it and buy one that fits.
    Or sell it and use the money to have one custom-built.

  9. #9
    Senior Member catherine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    VT/NJ
    Posts
    7,916
    Thanks, everybody!

    Pretty table. I can see why you bought it.
    Thanks, jp1. I know--it pains me to tear it apart. And to that point:

    I'd sell it and buy one that fits.
    We're thinking about that possibility rather than all the hassle and cost of MAKING it fit. I have a call in to a local carpenter and I'll see what they say, and based on that, we'll have them do it, or we'll list it on craigslist, and hopefully recoup our money.

    (Depending on the construction of the thing, I'd be tempted to measure/mark twice, then cut it a tad oversized with a crosscut loggging saw I have, or a chainsaw, then sand it to size/contour. Don't be like me.)
    DH does love his chainsaw, and he thought about that, but he's more afraid of splintering the maple if he doesn't catch the grain right--and the top is the type with the little squares of maple, so it could be a disaster.
    "Do any human beings ever realize life while they live it--every, every minute?" Emily Webb, Our Town
    www.silententry.wordpress.com

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    612
    Quote Originally Posted by catherine View Post
    A few months ago, DH and I found a Boos island/table. For our new lake cabin, we need something next to the stove in an approximately 2' x 2' space, and I was looking for a quality 2nd-hand butcher block.

    So we just ran into this one (pictured) in the consignment shop that has provided many of the furnishings in our current home over the years. Even though I wasn't sure about whether or not it would fit we bought it for $375. (New Boos tables go for over $1200). I was a bit nervous because the table is the right width (24") but not really the right depth (48"). I figured we could use it as an island/peninsula.

    BUT when we went up in March it was very clear to me that the double-wide butcher block was not going to work. On the way home we had the brilliant idea to cut the table in half and then brace the legless half against the wall next to the stove.

    Any suggestions on how to cut this sucker in half? Should we go to a professional or would we be able to just draw a straight line and do it ourselves. If we do it ourselves, what kind of saw do we need?

    IMG_3984.jpg

    a cabinet shop should be able to handle this. Just ask around.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •